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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1989
Contrary to allegations that his First Amendment rights had been abridged, the publications manager of the Cal State Los Angeles student newspaper, who was fired Thursday, was dismissed because of unsatisfactory job performance, a university official said Friday. Marc Haefele became the second such official of the University Times to be fired in less than a year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1989
Contrary to allegations that his First Amendment rights had been abridged, the publications manager of the Cal State Los Angeles student newspaper, who was fired Thursday, was dismissed because of unsatisfactory job performance, a university official said Friday. Marc Haefele became the second such official of the University Times to be fired in less than a year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1989
Marc Haefele on Thursday became the second publisher of Cal State Los Angeles' student newspaper to be fired in less than a year after squabbles with administrators over negative articles about campus activities. Haefele replaced former University Times publisher and journalism teacher Joan Zyda on April 20, a day after she was dismissed over issues of press freedom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1989
Marc Haefele on Thursday became the second publisher of Cal State Los Angeles' student newspaper to be fired in less than a year after squabbles with administrators over negative articles about campus activities. Haefele replaced former University Times publisher and journalism teacher Joan Zyda on April 20, a day after she was dismissed over issues of press freedom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1988 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
To the editor of the troubled student newspaper at Cal State L.A., the university's decision last week to reassign--some would say demote--the paper's paid publisher represents a serious assault on the freedom of the campus press. "I think it's a direct indication that (administrators) are going to attempt to seize editorial control of our student newspaper," said Peggy Taormina, 46, the student editor-in-chief of the thrice-weekly University Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1988
The former publisher of Cal State Los Angeles' student newspaper, The University Times, has filed a $2-million claim against the state, alleging that she was wrongfully fired. The claim by Joan Zyda, filed last week at the State Board of Control, is likely to be rejected and result in a trial, a board spokesman said Monday. Zyda was fired in April as publisher and journalism teacher in what she said was a move by campus officials to censor negative news about the school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1987 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
At Cal State Los Angeles, one of the year's more animated civics lessons is being taught without benefit of classroom or professor. Instead, an often acrimonious allegory, in which the main characters are the First Amendment, Representative Government and old-fashioned Economics, is being staged in the halls of the student assembly and on the pages of the student newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1989
The former publisher of Cal State L.A.'s student newspaper filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday against the university and five officials, alleging that her First Amendment rights of free expression were violated when she was fired last April. Joan Zyda, publisher of the University Times and a journalism teacher at the school for seven months, said she filed the U.S. District Court suit "to put a strong light on the First Amendment house of horrors" at the Los Angeles campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein, Samantha Schaefer and Kate Mather
A telephone warning that a bomb would go off in two hours prompted the evacuation and closure of the Cal State L.A. campus Thursday afternoon, Los Angeles police said. LAPD Assistant Chief Michel Moore said school administrators, after learning of the threat sometime before noon, made the decision to evacuate the El Sereno campus and cancel classes as a precaution. The LAPD Bomb Squad was on the scene coordinating with campus police, Moore said. No suspicious packages had been located and the campus had not received any previous threats, Moore said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1989
The former publisher of Cal State L.A.'s student newspaper filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday against the university and five officials, alleging that her First Amendment rights of free expression were violated when she was fired last April. Joan Zyda, publisher of the University Times and a journalism teacher at the school for seven months, said she filed the U.S. District Court suit "to put a strong light on the First Amendment house of horrors" at the Los Angeles campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1988
The former publisher of Cal State Los Angeles' student newspaper, The University Times, has filed a $2-million claim against the state, alleging that she was wrongfully fired. The claim by Joan Zyda, filed last week at the State Board of Control, is likely to be rejected and result in a trial, a board spokesman said Monday. Zyda was fired in April as publisher and journalism teacher in what she said was a move by campus officials to censor negative news about the school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1988 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
To the editor of the troubled student newspaper at Cal State L.A., the university's decision last week to reassign--some would say demote--the paper's paid publisher represents a serious assault on the freedom of the campus press. "I think it's a direct indication that (administrators) are going to attempt to seize editorial control of our student newspaper," said Peggy Taormina, 46, the student editor-in-chief of the thrice-weekly University Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1987 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
At Cal State Los Angeles, one of the year's more animated civics lessons is being taught without benefit of classroom or professor. Instead, an often acrimonious allegory, in which the main characters are the First Amendment, Representative Government and old-fashioned Economics, is being staged in the halls of the student assembly and on the pages of the student newspaper.
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