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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Dennis Ritchie, a computer scientist who wrote the popular C programming language and helped develop the Unix operating system, has died. He was 70. Ritchie died a month after his birthday, according to his biography on a Web page of Alcatel-Lucent's Bell Labs. Ritchie joined Bell Labs in the late 1960s. The company announced his death Thursday but did not give the cause or say when Ritchie died. Ritchie is best known for his contributions to computer programming and software.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Dennis Ritchie, a computer scientist who wrote the popular C programming language and helped develop the Unix operating system, has died. He was 70. Ritchie died a month after his birthday, according to his biography on a Web page of Alcatel-Lucent's Bell Labs. Ritchie joined Bell Labs in the late 1960s. The company announced his death Thursday but did not give the cause or say when Ritchie died. Ritchie is best known for his contributions to computer programming and software.
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BUSINESS
August 11, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. judge ruled that SCO Group did not have copyrights that are key to its claims of ownership of technology used in Linux software. U.S. District Judge Dale Kimball in Utah said Novell Inc., not SCO, owned copyrights to the Unix computer operating system. The ruling jeopardizes a related SCO lawsuit against IBM.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
SCO Group Inc., licenser of the Unix operating system, filed for bankruptcy protection, drained by unsuccessfully filing lawsuits claiming that its software code was misappropriated by developers of the open-source Linux operating system. The Lindon, Utah, company said it was seeking protection from creditors under Chapter 11 as it continued to license and improve Unix for corporate servers. In August, U.S. District Judge Dale Kimball ruled that Novell Inc.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp., already the world's leading supplier of personal computer software, announced a deal Wednesday that will allow it to expand its lead. Microsoft said that it is buying less than 20% in Santa Cruz Operation, the largest independent seller of Unix operating system software. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Operating systems, which direct the data flow of a computer, vary among computer manufacturers.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2003
SCO Group Inc. claims in a lawsuit that IBM Inc. purloined proprietary SCO source code and incorporated it as part of the Linux operating system ("SCO Suit May Blunt the Potential of Linux," June 6). Actually, as The Times pointed out, the source code base that SCO purchased from Novell (who in turn purchased it from AT&T Corp.) has long been "enriched" by open source contributions. Most of that enrichment occurred during the time that Unix was an academic product associated with Bell Laboratories.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2003 | From Reuters
SCO Group Inc. said it registered a copyright for its Unix software to strengthen its lawsuit against IBM Corp. In the suit, Lindon, Utah-based SCO claims its code is embedded in versions of the free Linux operating system that IBM distributed to its customers. SCO also said that beginning in a few weeks, it would offer licenses to companies that are using those versions. Armonk, N.Y.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
IBM Corp. is to unveil a new server computer today that an analyst says gives the world's largest computer maker a temporary advantage over two key rivals. IBM's pSeries 680, part of the company's new eServer line, is the most powerful server using the increasingly popular Unix operating system, according to Armonk, N.Y.-based IBM.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
SCO Group Inc., licenser of the Unix operating system, filed for bankruptcy protection, drained by unsuccessfully filing lawsuits claiming that its software code was misappropriated by developers of the open-source Linux operating system. The Lindon, Utah, company said it was seeking protection from creditors under Chapter 11 as it continued to license and improve Unix for corporate servers. In August, U.S. District Judge Dale Kimball ruled that Novell Inc.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1987 | Richard O'Reilly, Richard O'Reilly designs microcomputer applications for The Times
When telephone giant AT&T decided to enter the computer business about three years ago, there was a lot of speculation about whether Unix could someday rival MS-DOS as the most popular operating system for personal computers. It hasn't happened yet.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. judge ruled that SCO Group did not have copyrights that are key to its claims of ownership of technology used in Linux software. U.S. District Judge Dale Kimball in Utah said Novell Inc., not SCO, owned copyrights to the Unix computer operating system. The ruling jeopardizes a related SCO lawsuit against IBM.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
In another sign of a brain drain at Sun Microsystems Inc., co-founder and renowned futurist Bill Joy announced Tuesday that he was leaving the network computing company to pursue other interests. Joy, who has been dubbed the "Thomas Edison of the Internet," was one of the people behind the famed Unix operating system that put Sun on the map and also helped develop the Java software that forever changed computer networking.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2003 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
The software company that claims to own key pieces of the free Linux operating system undermined its case this week by displaying samples of the disputed code -- which critics then traced back to a decades-old program released with few restrictions. SCO Group Inc. set off a firestorm in the technology world this year by suing IBM Corp., alleging that the computing giant improperly contributed SCO-owned code to Linux.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2003 | From Reuters
SCO Group Inc. said it registered a copyright for its Unix software to strengthen its lawsuit against IBM Corp. In the suit, Lindon, Utah-based SCO claims its code is embedded in versions of the free Linux operating system that IBM distributed to its customers. SCO also said that beginning in a few weeks, it would offer licenses to companies that are using those versions. Armonk, N.Y.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2003
SCO Group Inc. claims in a lawsuit that IBM Inc. purloined proprietary SCO source code and incorporated it as part of the Linux operating system ("SCO Suit May Blunt the Potential of Linux," June 6). Actually, as The Times pointed out, the source code base that SCO purchased from Novell (who in turn purchased it from AT&T Corp.) has long been "enriched" by open source contributions. Most of that enrichment occurred during the time that Unix was an academic product associated with Bell Laboratories.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
SCO Group Inc. canceled IBM Corp.'s contract for the AIX Unix operating system Monday and revised a lawsuit against IBM to seek as much as $50 billion. The amended complaint also seeks an order forbidding the sale of IBM's AIX operating system, SCO Chief Executive Darl McBride said. SCO, which licenses Unix to thousands of companies, sued IBM in March claiming it had transferred Unix code into the related Linux operating system in breach of IBM's contract. The Armonk, N.Y.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
Merger talks have ended between an AT&T unit and a consortium of rival computer makers developing a different version of an important computer operating system, the groups said Monday. The announcement means that two major versions of the Unix operating system will be promoted in the marketplace. An operating system is the base layer of software that controls such computer functions as operating the keyboard and opening files.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1990 | From Reuters
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. said Tuesday that it would market and develop some of Tandem Computers Inc.'s Unix-based products in an alliance that may entrench the Unix operating system as a market leader for fault-tolerant computers. The long-distance telephone giant said it has acquired the rights to develop and market worldwide Tandem's Unix System V-based computer products and technology in an effort to accelerate the availability and acceptance of System V software.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
IBM Corp. is to unveil a new server computer today that an analyst says gives the world's largest computer maker a temporary advantage over two key rivals. IBM's pSeries 680, part of the company's new eServer line, is the most powerful server using the increasingly popular Unix operating system, according to Armonk, N.Y.-based IBM.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2000 | NICOLE VOLPE, REUTERS
Hewlett-Packard Co. on Tuesday unveiled a new mainframe-class Unix server--a refrigerator-size computer designed to support "dot-coms," Web service providers and other data-intensive businesses. The Palo Alto-based computer maker said its HP-900 Superdome minimizes system downtime through increased component backups, a wider range of easily changeable components and built-in error-correction capabilities.
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