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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
With the ground-breaking 9½-hour "Shoah" and similar documentaries to his credit, it would be understandable if filmmaker Claude Lanzmann felt he'd spent enough time dealing with the Holocaust. But the opposite is true, with a vengeance. At age 87 Lanzmann has come out with one of his most provocative films because he felt he had no choice. The subject of "The Last of the Unjust," based on a series of interviews the director did in 1975, "continued to dwell in my mind and haunt me," Lanzmann has written.
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OPINION
March 30, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Congress recognized 40 years ago that it was counterproductive and just plain wrong to incarcerate juveniles for trivial misbehavior such as truancy, breaking curfew, smoking or drinking. These acts, known as status offenses, are illegal only because the person committing them is a minor. Federal law passed at that time prohibited states from locking away most status offenders, but in 1980 the law was amended to allow incarceration when a court order had been violated. In other words, if a truant teenager was ordered by a court to attend school, and then cut class, incarceration was allowed.
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OPINION
October 6, 2002
Re "Unintended Effect of War on Drugs Found in Study," Sept. 20: The article makes it abundantly clear that there has been a decades-long process of "drug enforcement" that has resulted in the incarceration of hundreds of thousands of minority and poor individuals. Most of the prisoners are nonviolent, low-level offenders, and a disproportionate share are minorities. Given the information in the article, the headline is misleading and outrageous. This outcome of the war on drugs is well-known and predictable, not unintended.
SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | By Sam Farmer
Kevin O'Neill, the longtime Miami Dolphins trainer fired in the wake of the team's bullying scandal, is firing back at the franchise through his lawyer. Attorney Jack Scarola issued a statement Thursday on behalf of O'Neill, who in the recently released report of investigator Ted Wells is accused of laughing at inappropriate jokes aimed at offensive tackle Jonathan Martin and an unnamed assistant trainer. O'Neill accompanied Dolphins executives, coaches and scouts to last month's scouting combine in Indianapolis, but was fired on the eve of the annual event.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1985
Regarding bag people and restrooms (Nov. 15): To take away this facility without first providing another as adequate is, in my opinion, unjust and discriminatory. N.J. MIKUS Westminster
OPINION
November 7, 2005
Re "Angelenos Join in Anti-Bush Protest," Nov. 3 Protesting an unjust war is a fundamental right, but blocking traffic infringes on others' rights. Protest demonstrations ought to be held in stadiums, ballparks, public parks, etc. DON GATELY Valencia
MAGAZINE
August 27, 1989
When Abramson's client herds people into a freezer and shoots them to death, he's the one I can see wearing a swastika--not the state who sentenced him. These "adorable," "sweet," "tragic" and "pathetic" guys she's defending are the inhumane, the unjust, the dehumanizers. VALERIE A. CAMPBELL Upland
MAGAZINE
August 31, 2003
There is only one villain in the story on Bakersfield's unjust molestation convictions (" 'Kids Don't Lie,' " by John Johnson, Aug. 10). Kern County Dist. Atty. Ed Jagels is a man whose hubris is exceeded only by his incompetence and inability to distinguish right from wrong. Herbert M. Schoenberg Tarzana
BUSINESS
February 11, 1990
As a stepparent, I must protest your headline ("Ford Aerospace Treated for Years Like a Stepchild," Jan. 14). All the stepparents I know try hard to be good parents to their stepchildren. Using "like a stepchild" to connote neglect is both unjust and offensive. DIANA KRAVIF Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1991
I would like to applaud Slovenia and Croatia on their bold moves for independence. For the first time ever we see an opportunity for true freedom in the Balkans. Yugoslavia, created by the vastly unjust Versailles Treaty, has never been a true home for the Slovenian and Croatian people. It is time the United Sates stood up for not only the rights of the Slovenes and Croatians but for all people, whether they be in the Soviet Union, Iraq or even Yugoslavia. The United States stood for freedom in the Gulf War and it's time we take a stand for freedom in the Balkans.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
When your previous work includes what is widely considered to be the definitive documentary on the Holocaust, how do you follow that up? French filmmaker Claude Lanzmann has returned over the years to the material that went into the making of his 9 1/2-hour 1985 landmark documentary “Shoah” and with his latest film, “The Last of the Unjust,” he again digs back into that past. “The Last of the Unjust,” playing now in Los Angeles, is based on a series of filmed interviews conducted by Lanzmann with Benjamin Murmelstein in 1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
With the ground-breaking 9½-hour "Shoah" and similar documentaries to his credit, it would be understandable if filmmaker Claude Lanzmann felt he'd spent enough time dealing with the Holocaust. But the opposite is true, with a vengeance. At age 87 Lanzmann has come out with one of his most provocative films because he felt he had no choice. The subject of "The Last of the Unjust," based on a series of interviews the director did in 1975, "continued to dwell in my mind and haunt me," Lanzmann has written.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Raymond Rodriguez was 10 years old in 1936 when his immigrant father walked out of the family's Long Beach farmhouse and returned to Mexico, never to see his wife and children again. The son would spend decades pondering the forces that had driven his father away, an effort that reached fruition in "Decade of Betrayal," a social history of the 1930s focusing on an estimated 1 million Mexicans and Mexican Americans unjustly deported or scared into leaving their homes in the United States by federal and local officials seeking remedies for the Great Depression.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"The Scottsboro Boys" has finally arrived in Los Angeles, a year after this 2010 Broadway musical performed in San Diego and San Francisco. It shouldn't have taken this long, but don't miss the opportunity to catch one of the most inventive American musicals to come around in a long while. The show, which opened Wednesday at the Ahmanson Theatre, is a sophisticated knockout, a musical for those who like their razzle-dazzle with a radical, unsentimental edge. The subject matter is the opposite of upbeat, but "The Scottsboro Boys" reminds us that remembrance can be a kind of redress, that not letting evil escape into oblivion can be a partial victory.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2012 | Bloomberg News
Federal energy regulators continued their crackdown on manipulation of California's energy market, ordering a Florida firm to pay a fine of $2.5 million and disgorge unjust profits of $911,553 plus interest. On Monday, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approved a settlement with Florida energy company Gila River Power, a subsidiary of Entegra Power Group, to pay the fine and penalties. The agreement marked the first time a market participant has admitted to a violation of the federal commission's anti-manipulation rule in an energy trading case, the commission said.
WORLD
June 2, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - The life sentence imposed on toppled President Hosni Mubarak for complicity in the deaths of hundreds of protesters marks an unprecedented milestone in Egypt's path toward democracy yet serves as a reminder of the political limitations challenging rebellions that have swept the Arab world. Mubarak epitomized the calculating autocrat, and Saturday's verdict reverberated across a region that has seldom seen the strong so precipitously tumble in popular revolt. But behind the image of the disgraced leader propped up on a stretcher in the defendants' cage remains a nation not fully free of his grasp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1986
When I read of the Supreme Court's ruling on homosexuality, I was so angry I was brought to tears. I sat and dumbfoundedly asked myself how the Supreme Court, the highest and most just court in the land, could make such an unjust decision. America was founded on the principles of freedom and justice, but in this decision the court has clearly said there is no freedom or justice for me--because I choose to love another man. The gods have spoken. I am a sodomite. I am a criminal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1986
It has come to my attention that Judge Kathleen O'Leary just received a promotion to Superior Court. However, judging from her recent unjust jail sentence of Edward Allan to jail, I fail to see why she did not receive a demotion. This former chief of police spent his whole life guarding our rights and now in his senior years, this is his reward. Does Judge O'Leary really think he is a threat to society? DOROTHY M. ALLEN Placentia
NATIONAL
May 6, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
U.S. NAVAL BASE GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba - The defense team for Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, now formally charged with capital murder in connection with the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, on Sunday angrily called the military commission legal process a political "regime" set up to put him and his four accused collaborators to death. David Nevin, Mohammed's civilian attorney, said new rules imposed under the Obama administration barred the lawyers from discussing with their clients whether they were mistreated by U.S. authorities and, in the case of Mohammed, tortured after their arrests eight years ago. "We are operating under a regime here," Nevin said.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2011 | By Lew Sichelman
Delinquent borrowers who think they've been treated unfairly by their mortgage lenders and the companies that service their loans will soon have their day in court. Well, not court, per se. But within the next few weeks, federal regulators will announce a new complaint procedure for borrowers who think they've been unjustly harmed by errors, misrepresentations or other deficiencies in the foreclosure process. Under the process, which is being spearheaded by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, aggrieved borrowers whose primary residence was in any stage of the foreclosure process between January 2009 and December 2010 will be eligible to have their cases reviewed by an independent consultant.
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