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Unknown Theater Company

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April 2, 2007 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
Audiences showing up at Unknown Theater quickly discover that they're in for anything but a conventional evening of storytelling. Instead, they may find an upside-down room that seems to swallow sound. Or chairs circling a 3,000-pound pile of dark rubber dirt. Or an usher who'll ask you to sit on one side of the house, your companion on the other. "I always consider the role of the audience," says Unknown's artistic director, Chris Covics. "I think there's a dialogue.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2007 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
Audiences showing up at Unknown Theater quickly discover that they're in for anything but a conventional evening of storytelling. Instead, they may find an upside-down room that seems to swallow sound. Or chairs circling a 3,000-pound pile of dark rubber dirt. Or an usher who'll ask you to sit on one side of the house, your companion on the other. "I always consider the role of the audience," says Unknown's artistic director, Chris Covics. "I think there's a dialogue.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2006 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
In 1958, almost 50 years before America became the Colbert Nation, before Steve Carell ran "The Office" and W. was leader, Harold Pinter wrote a dark little play about pain and power called "The Hothouse" and put it in a drawer. He later directed it, in 1980, but his second full-length play remains one of this modern master's least known works.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2006 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
TO an aquatic soundscape of singing whales, dripping water and rolling waves, dancer-choreographer Monica Favand, swathed in yards of pale blue silk, glides across the floor with tiny steps reminiscent of a geisha's. If, that is, the geisha was also capable of striking one-legged poses, tossing off high-energy pirouettes and executing sinewy backward bends.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1987 | NANCY CHURNIN
For a relatively unknown theater company to tackle the works of relatively unknown playwrights suggests a guiding spirit with the impossible gallantry of the charging Light Brigade. With this in mind, it would be lovely to report that the Progressive Stage Company's double bill, "Dying is Easy, Comedy is Hard," playing through Nov. 21 at the Sixth Avenue Playhouse, works.
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