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OPINION
July 1, 2001
A dog owner for many years and lover of most socialized, trained and leashed dogs, I can relate to "Unleashed Dogs" (letter, June 26), as can many others who venture out for a walk. My husband and my mother, both heart patients out walking in their neighborhoods, have been bitten by unleashed dogs. My husband now walks indoors on the treadmill. The day this letter appeared, my mother was frightened again by unleashed dogs, this time by five dogs accompanied by the unapologetic owner, who was also out for a walk, carrying dumbbells.
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SPORTS
April 27, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
OAKLAND -- Golden State Warriors fans are among the most boisterous in the NBA, and they weren't holding back when it came to the brouhaha involving Clippers owner Donald Sterling. Shortly after the Clippers walked onto the court for warmups before Game 4 of their first-round series at Oracle Arena on Sunday, a fan chanted, “KKK-Clippers!”, alluding to the racist remarks purportedly made by Sterling during a recent conversation with a female friend. Full coverage: The Donald Sterling controversy A voice that sounds like Sterling's can be heard in an audio recording released by TMZ telling his friend that he was upset she posted a picture on her Instagram account of herself next to Lakers legend Magic Johnson because he didn't want her to be associated with black people.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1995
Regarding the new legislation providing for the arrest of individuals before they have committed a crime ("Wilson Signs Bill Allowing Arrests Before Crime Is Committed," Oct. 18): Now that the thought police have been unleashed upon us, they might as well lock me up and throw away the key. The pictures in my head relating to what ought to be done to the sponsors and ratifiers of this legislation are the imaginary equivalent of a class A felony--I would plead self-defense. There hasn't been a totalitarian regime yet that hasn't twisted the legitimate fear of crime by their citizens into a convenient smoke screen for the arbitrary exercise of state power.
SPORTS
April 18, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
After playing into the 11th inning on Monday in a 3-3 tie, Harvard-Westlake and Loyola had a much different Mission League game on Thursday at Loyola. It was all Harvard-Westlake, which defeated the Cubs, 9-1. Jack Flaherty hit a three-run home run to help the Wolverines improve to 13-4-1 and 4-1-1 in league. Loyola (14-2-1, 6-1-1) lost an opportunity to put some distance on Harvard-Westlake. Now, if the two teams end up tied, Harvard-Westlake has the tiebreaker edge. Michael Vokulich threw four innings and Logan Simon closed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1988
I was disturbed to see featured in your San Diego County Edition dogs romping on the beach unleashed. Then I read that a crowd sided with a teeth-baring large dog over the policeman defending himself. Finally, I was tide-pooling with my children at Cardiff State Beach this weekend and a dog, this time on a leash, was allowed by its owner to defecate in one of the pools. Dogs don't belong on public beaches--leashed or unleashed. The dogs are not the problem--it's the owners! Allowing a protective large dog loose is unconscionable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1986
We were quite dismayed to see the picture on the top front page of the July 24 View section--a picture of Jerry Schad apparently breaking the law. For the information of your readers, it is unlawful in San Diego County to bring a dog into a public park. Also, a dog must be leashed when not on private property. There are good reasons for these laws. Our two small children have repeatedly been terrorized in parks by large, friendly, unleashed dogs who run over and jump up on them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1996
I note in your article about the young Inca girl, whose mummified remains are displayed in Washington ("Frozen Asset," May 23), that no value judgment is made about the practice of bashing children's brains out for religious purposes. However, the article does not fail to condemn the "invading Spaniards [who] unleashed a wave of violence." I am unaware of any 16th-century Spanish ritualistic slaughter of children. Who is the savage, who is the villain in this era of political correctness?
OPINION
February 6, 2003
It is difficult to comprehend the biased ignorance displayed by Boots Mertens in his Feb. 3 letter on Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's reelection. In it he compares Sharon to Hitler, in the latter's extermination of the Jews. We see Palestinian terrorist groups openly advocating the destruction of Jews and Israel, not the other way around. Sharon came to power only after Yasser Arafat unleashed a torrent of murderous actions against civilians in Israel. The actions of the Nazis have been very well documented, and there is no excuse for perpetrating such inflammatory lies.
MAGAZINE
July 12, 1992
In "Shouting It Like It Is" (Guest Bites Town, May 31), Bob Baker suggests that the Los Angeles riots must have been like watching the first atomic test at Los Alamos, N.M. I can assure him that he would not have marveled in terror at the energy unleashed if he had been in Los Alamos on the date of that first test of the atomic bomb. It took place about 300 miles south of Los Alamos in the desert near Alamogordo. JIM ROGERS Huntington Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1987
In the last installment, Gorbachev summarizes two delusions which mock reason and peace: (that a continued U.S. arms race can) "bleed white the Soviet economy," and (that American superior technology) "eventually in the military field," can solve even U.S. problems. It was painful to note that in comparison to some official U.S. pens, so deliciously zapped in freedom, his pen often made more sense. He, like more perceptive Americans now and everyone soon, perceives that the world's unleashed bullet makers and salesmen are enemies one and two. He, like the late Bertrand Russell, writes of the close relationship between chauvinism and war. Though he comes from an old, strange country, he thinks for himself, treats his wife with "new man" respect and, how backward, writes his own lines.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Judi Dash
Whether you've tracked in snow, mud, dirt or sand, there's no reason you should trouble yourself with scrubbing the floors of your weekend getaway or vacation rental. Just let loose the new Scooba 450 , a little robot floor mopper from the same folks who created the popular do-it-itself iRobot Roomba carpet vacuum. The Scooba 450 is a 14 1/2 -inch-diameter rechargeable disk that automatically propels its 9-pound self across wood, tile (or any uncarpeted floor), spinning and spiraling around the room, its sensors gauging the size of the floor, and redirecting its efforts when it bumps into a wall or other obstruction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Republican gubernatorial candidate Neel Kashkari unveiled a jobs plan Tuesday that calls for corporate tax breaks, hydraulic fracturing of some California oil deposits, reduced regulations on business and increased spending on water storage. The 10-point plan, focused on manufacturing, water, energy and the business climate, is the first policy Kashkari has set forth since announcing in January that he would run for office. The former U.S. Treasury official said his plan would "unleash" the private sector, creating hundreds of thousands of jobs.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
You might call it a Bermuda tuxedo. Pharrell Williams, fashion focus puller extraordinaire who stole the Grammys show with a Vivienne Westwood Mountie-style hat and spawned an Internet meme and runway trend at the same time, is at it again. More Oscar fashion galleries: Best and worst dressed | Stars on the red carpet | Makeup and hair | Men's fashion At the Oscars Sunday night, he's wearing a Lanvin shorts tuxedo. Experimental, absolutely. A little bit little boy?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
February is widely known as Black History Month, and Stephen Colbert chose to celebrate it in the strangest way possible on Thursday's show: with an animated short for a proposed TV show known as "Laser Klan. " Yes, that spelling is not a mistake. This animated short is about the Ku Klux Klan and uses the real-life news that Klan members were attempting to sell a "workable death ray" to Jewish groups in order to kill Muslims. Last month, another real-life KKK sympathizer was arrested for building a portable X-ray machine he was attempting to sell use with Jewish groups, again to kill Muslims.
WORLD
January 3, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - A group of armed men posing as public servants talked their way into a prison in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero early Friday and unleashed a bloody attack on inmates and guards, according to the state prosecutor's office. At least nine people were killed in the assault and the ensuing shootout with prison guards. The attack occurred in the city of Iguala, about halfway between Mexico City and the Pacific Coast resorts of Acapulco. It came less than two months after Mexico's national human rights commission issued a report that detailed the wretched state of the country's penal system, noting that 65 of the nation's 101 most crowded prisons are effectively under inmate control.
AUTOS
December 5, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
Ford Motor Co. has unleashed the sixth-generation Mustang, the product of a delicate effort to balance half a century of history with demands for modern powertrains, technology and styling. The result retains the essence of the late-1960s fastbacks on which the car's retro-styled predecessor was based - a long hood, short rear deck, tri-bar taillights and a shark-nosed grill. PHOTOS: 50 years of Mustang But the automaker carefully avoided churning out another throwback, instead seeking to connect the Mustang to the design ethic seen across its lineup.
TRAVEL
May 31, 1998
Being a dog owner and always looking for tips on how to happily travel with Fido, I read with interest your Weekend Escape on Yosemite ("Dog Days Inn," April 26). I was disappointed to note that the only way the author and his wife could enjoy their weekend away was to break the hotel's and the park's rules on dogs--especially ironic since the author cited these rules. For example, they left their dog alone on the patio of their hotel room during at least one mealtime and later let the dog frolic unleashed in the Merced River.
OPINION
September 9, 2004
Re "Hikers in East Bay Parks Have a Beef With Cows," Sept. 6: I believe that public access and cattle grazing can coexist. We have public ranchland here in Cambria that once accommodated both hikers and cattle. Unfortunately, the cattle are gone but the problems persist -- the result of human activity and dogs, not bovines. Caution, not fear and reaction, is always the best policy around cattle. Incredible as it may sound, I have had a herd of cattle encircle me to fend off aggressive, unleashed dogs.
WORLD
October 17, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell
TEHRAN - Shahriyar Khatri was among many here welcoming news that this year's Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the international agency that oversees a global ban on toxic armaments. "I'm very glad that people finally know more about the OPCW and its important work," said Khatri, a toxicologist and physician who works with a government-backed group raising awareness about the plight of chemical attack victims of Iran's 1980-88 war with neighboring Iraq.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2013 | Kate Mather, Abby Sewell and Matt Stevens
Littlerock is one of those small Antelope Valley towns that melt into the desert, a place of few people but many dogs. Houses surrounded by chain-link fences bear "no trespassing" and "beware of dog" signs. A chorus of barks and growls greets passersby. Numerous strays also roam the desert. Residents say Littlerock has become a dumping ground for unwanted dogs. "A car will come down the street at 40 mph, slow down and a door will open," said longtime resident David Cleveland.
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