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Unmanned Aircraft

BUSINESS
July 30, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Bolstered by sales of robotic planes and radar systems, military contractor Northrop Grumman Corp. said second-quarter earnings nearly doubled from a year earlier. Northrop's earnings rose to $711 million, or $2.34 a share. That's up 93% from last year's $368 million, or $1.21 a share. Analysts, on average, had expected $2.19 a share. The Century City aerospace giant, which has sprawling facilities in Redondo Beach, El Segundo and Palmdale, said sales rose 3% to $8.8 billion.
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BUSINESS
November 28, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Navy's new bat-winged experimental drone has been delivered to an aircraft carrier to undergo handling tests aboard the ship. The Navy said that sailors aboard the aircraft carrier Harry S. Truman took delivery of the drone Monday from Naval Air Station Patuxent River in Maryland, where it had been undergoing tests. Truman is the first aircraft carrier to conduct test operations for an unmanned aircraft. The drone, named the X-47B, is designed to perform one of aviation's most difficult maneuvers: landing on the deck of an aircraft carrier.
NATIONAL
December 30, 2013 | By Richard Simon and W.J. Hennigan
WASHINGTON -- After a fierce nationwide competition that offers potentially big economic benefits for the winners, six sites were selected Monday for testing of how drones can be more widely used in U.S. airspace. The Federal Aviation Administration announced the selection of sites in Alaska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Texas and Virginia. California, vying to become the Silicon Valley of robotic aircraft, was among the losers in the 24-state competition.  "These test sites will give us valuable information about how best to ensure the safe introduction of this advanced technology into our nation's skies,” Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx in a statement.
WORLD
June 7, 2010 | By Julian E. Barnes, Los Angeles Times
As it rapidly expands its drone program over Afghanistan, the U.S. military is turning to the technology that powers NFL broadcasts, ESPN and TV news to catalog a flood of information coming from the cameras of its fleet of unmanned aircraft. U.S. military archives hold 24 million minutes of video collected by Predators and other remotely piloted aircraft that have become an essential tool for commanders. But the library is largely useless because analysts often have no way of knowing exactly what they have, or any way to search for information that is particularly valuable.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
A test flight of an experimental aircraft traveling at 20 times the speed of sound ended prematurely Thursday morning when the arrowhead-shaped vehicle failed and stopped sending back real-time data to engineers and scientists who were monitoring the mission. The unmanned aircraft, dubbed Falcon Hypersonic Technology Vehicle 2, was meant to test new technologies that could give the Pentagon the capability to deliver non-nuclear military strikes anywhere on the globe in less than an hour.
NEWS
January 19, 2002 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Central Intelligence Agency jury-rigged a remote-controlled spy plane with missiles and then used them to take out a Taliban target in Afghanistan, it was a first step in revolutionizing air-to-ground combat. Instead of a pilot in a cockpit, a computer operator in an air-conditioned trailer hundreds of miles away used a keyboard and a joystick to fire the missile.
WORLD
November 5, 2011 | By David S. Cloud and David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
On the evening of April 5, a pilot settled into a leather captain's chair at Creech Air Force Base in southern Nevada and took the controls of a Predator drone flying over one of the most violent areas of southwestern Afghanistan. Minutes later, his radio crackled. A firefight had broken out. Taliban insurgents had ambushed about two dozen Marines patrolling a bitterly contested road. The Air Force captain angled his joystick and the drone veered toward the fighting taking place half a world away, where it was already morning.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Northrop Grumman Corp., the nation's third-largest defense firm, received a $202-million Air Force contract Friday to produce four unmanned Global Hawk spy planes -- the kind tested in Iraq and Afghanistan. Northrop will supply a total of four planes with different configurations of sensors, as well as mission-control equipment, extra sensors and other spare parts, the Air Force said. Work will be completed by October 2005. Unmanned spy planes are a central part of efforts by the U.S.
WORLD
January 18, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Improved technology and better planning before November's battle for Fallouja helped U.S. forces avoid the "friendly fire" casualties that have plagued other large-scale military operations, Marine Corps commanders say. Col. John Coleman, chief of staff for the Camp Pendleton-based 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, said new technology, rushed to Fallouja within days of the battle, allowed air and ground units to know the precise location of U.S. forces in real time.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2012 | By Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - On a chaparral-covered hillside 40 miles north of Los Angeles in June 2010, researchers from the Department of Homeland Security hid a device the size of a pack of cigarettes that emitted a safe pulse of low-grade radiation. It was a stand-in for a dirty bomb, or fallout from a nuclear meltdown. Nearby, a pilot toggled a joystick, and a gray drone with the wingspan of a California condor banked through the sky. As the plane's sensor sniffed for radioactive isotopes, law enforcement officers and firefighters watched a portable controller that looked like an oversized Game Boy. In minutes, a warning signal glowed on the screen.
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