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Unmanned Aircraft

BUSINESS
July 30, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Bolstered by sales of robotic planes and radar systems, military contractor Northrop Grumman Corp. said second-quarter earnings nearly doubled from a year earlier. Northrop's earnings rose to $711 million, or $2.34 a share. That's up 93% from last year's $368 million, or $1.21 a share. Analysts, on average, had expected $2.19 a share. The Century City aerospace giant, which has sprawling facilities in Redondo Beach, El Segundo and Palmdale, said sales rose 3% to $8.8 billion.
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BUSINESS
November 28, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Navy's new bat-winged experimental drone has been delivered to an aircraft carrier to undergo handling tests aboard the ship. The Navy said that sailors aboard the aircraft carrier Harry S. Truman took delivery of the drone Monday from Naval Air Station Patuxent River in Maryland, where it had been undergoing tests. Truman is the first aircraft carrier to conduct test operations for an unmanned aircraft. The drone, named the X-47B, is designed to perform one of aviation's most difficult maneuvers: landing on the deck of an aircraft carrier.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas
The Obama administration formally asked Congress on Tuesday for $600 million in emergency funds to hire another 1,000 Border Patrol agents, acquire two drones and enhance security along the Southwest border. The money would also pay for an additional 160 Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents and extra Border Patrol canine teams, according to a senior White House official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly. In a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D- San Francisco)
NEWS
January 19, 2002 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Central Intelligence Agency jury-rigged a remote-controlled spy plane with missiles and then used them to take out a Taliban target in Afghanistan, it was a first step in revolutionizing air-to-ground combat. Instead of a pilot in a cockpit, a computer operator in an air-conditioned trailer hundreds of miles away used a keyboard and a joystick to fire the missile.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
A test flight of an experimental aircraft traveling at 20 times the speed of sound ended prematurely Thursday morning when the arrowhead-shaped vehicle failed and stopped sending back real-time data to engineers and scientists who were monitoring the mission. The unmanned aircraft, dubbed Falcon Hypersonic Technology Vehicle 2, was meant to test new technologies that could give the Pentagon the capability to deliver non-nuclear military strikes anywhere on the globe in less than an hour.
WORLD
November 5, 2011 | By David S. Cloud and David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
On the evening of April 5, a pilot settled into a leather captain's chair at Creech Air Force Base in southern Nevada and took the controls of a Predator drone flying over one of the most violent areas of southwestern Afghanistan. Minutes later, his radio crackled. A firefight had broken out. Taliban insurgents had ambushed about two dozen Marines patrolling a bitterly contested road. The Air Force captain angled his joystick and the drone veered toward the fighting taking place half a world away, where it was already morning.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Northrop Grumman Corp., the nation's third-largest defense firm, received a $202-million Air Force contract Friday to produce four unmanned Global Hawk spy planes -- the kind tested in Iraq and Afghanistan. Northrop will supply a total of four planes with different configurations of sensors, as well as mission-control equipment, extra sensors and other spare parts, the Air Force said. Work will be completed by October 2005. Unmanned spy planes are a central part of efforts by the U.S.
WORLD
January 18, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Improved technology and better planning before November's battle for Fallouja helped U.S. forces avoid the "friendly fire" casualties that have plagued other large-scale military operations, Marine Corps commanders say. Col. John Coleman, chief of staff for the Camp Pendleton-based 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, said new technology, rushed to Fallouja within days of the battle, allowed air and ground units to know the precise location of U.S. forces in real time.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The cars begin rolling through the security checkpoints before dawn. Here, in a sprawling complex amid the craggy rock outcroppings of north San Diego County, 3,300 workers are building a new generation of weapons central to the military's vision for modern warfare. This is where General Atomics Aeronautical Systems makes the Predator and Reaper drones, robotic planes that can thread the rugged mountains of Pakistan, capture video images of terrorist hideouts and launch 500-pound Hellfire missiles to blast them apart.
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