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NEWS
June 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
San Francisco became the first city in the country Monday to grant official public recognition to homosexual and unmarried heterosexual couples. Mayor Art Agnos signed the landmark law, calling it "one of the most important milestones in San Francisco's effort to adopt policies to recognize the diversity of families and to extend to all people in our city the basic human right to form families of their choice." Agnos also appointed a "Task Force on Family Policy" to determine guidelines for allowing unmarried city workers to add partners, adult children and extended family members to the city's health plan.
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OPINION
March 2, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Nearly a generation ago, MSNBC's Chris Matthews coined a description of our two political parties that may turn out to be his most enduring contribution to American punditry. Republicans, Matthews wrote, were the "Daddy Party," all about military security and self-reliance; Democrats were the "Mommy Party," all about health, education and nurturing. At the time, in 1991, Democrats weren't sure they considered that much of a compliment. Since then, a long line of Democratic presidential candidates - including one who is an actual mommy, Hillary Rodham Clinton - have taken pains to prove they could be as tough and decisive as any stereotypical Mad Man. But this year, facing an uphill battle to retain their majority in the Senate, the Democrats have decided to embrace the label as a badge of honor, making a strong appeal to women - especially working mothers - with whom Republicans have struggled to connect.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2001
"Unwed Partners up 72% in U.S." (Aug. 20) failed to mention that many people, myself and my fiancee included, live together not just because we plan to marry, but also because it's financially advantageous. Considering today's exorbitant cost of living, cohabitating has enabled us to split the costs for housing, utilities, food and even car insurance. And as the U.S. becomes more overpopulated, housing more scarce and prices more unreachable, this trend will continue to rise. As for those who cry immorality, cohabitating couples aren't doing anything they wouldn't already be doing even if they lived apart.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Long before "lean in" became a rallying cry for professional women of America, there was "Murphy Brown. " In fall 1988, the sitcom about a brash, unmarried, fortysomething news anchor and recovering alcoholic premiered on CBS. Though it was slow to build into a hit, "Murphy Brown" became a top 5 show, won 18 Emmys over 10 seasons and sparked a contentious national dialogue about single motherhood, thanks to a certain vice president. Played by patrician blond Candice Bergen, Brown may have been physically reminiscent of real-life newswoman Diane Sawyer, but with her irascible and relentless disposition, she was, as creator Diane English famously put it, closer to "Mike Wallace in a dress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1994
The Domestic Partnership Registration Bill, introduced by Assemblyman Richard Katz (D-Los Angeles), promotes responsibility and security for committed but unmarried couples. The bill will enable all committed couples in the state to register as "domestic partners" and assume certain responsibilities and limited benefits, provided they live together, share expenses and meet other basic requirements. They'll have family visitation rights in the hospital, legal preference to administer each other's affairs should one partner become incapacitated, and the ability to use a standard legal form to will each other property.
OPINION
September 8, 1991
Re "Stress Found to Be Prime Suspect in Colds Mystery," front page, Aug. 29: Apparently in the 1940s, Frank Loesser anticipated modern science's recent findings of a connection between stress, frustration and the common cold when, in "Guys and Dolls," Adelaide lamented: "It sez here in this book . . . the average unmarried female . . . due to some long frustration may react with . . . symptoms . . . affecting the upper respiratory tract!...
NEWS
October 30, 1988
Is Bush ready to increase public spending for adoption and welfare programs if abortions are ruled illegal by the Supreme Court? No, is the answer. Where will the young, poor and black unmarried women turn for help with a child they cannot feed, clothe or shelter? Every conservative who is for adoption rather than abortion should be required to read your article and face a tax increase for every child born who cannot be placed for adoption. HENRY R. McCARTY San Diego
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1998
Re "Teenage Mother Fights Rose Court Rule," Sept. 27: There is a difference between equal opportunity in the workplace or in government and standards of eligibility for competition in a private pageant. The pageant officials have the absolute right to determine the parameters of competition, which are being a C student in the Pasadena area and a single woman at least 17 years old. It is not for mothers, whether married or single. I think it is a moral issue. An unmarried woman should not be a Rose princess or queen, even if married mothers were allowed.
NEWS
October 20, 1991
Why is it that when you see an article on single women, it is invariably written by a woman, and when you see an article on single men, it is invariably written by a woman? It's not surprising that these articles typically regard marriage as normal and bachelorhood as deviant. The article did nothing to address more pragmatic reasons for staying a bachelor, like the fact that the majority of marriages end in divorce. In the past few decades, divorce proceedings have shown that marriage is (in the eyes of the state)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1990
Discrimination against singles? Wait a minute! Let's look at this from another point of view. The strength and stability of our society comes from our families. As a society we have very good reasons for encouraging people to marry and stay married. Is this necessarily discrimination against singles? The insurance companies, quoted in your article, have given a good reason for giving rate preference to married people; married people on the average have better driving records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Closing a loophole in California's rape law, Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday signed a bill clarifying that an attacker who impersonates someone else to coerce a victim into sexual activity can be prosecuted for rape. He also approved a measure cracking down on so-called swatting calls made by pranksters claiming false emergencies, often at celebrities' addresses, to draw out police. The rape bill was in response to a recent Court of Appeal decision that overturned the rape conviction of a Los Angeles County man. The court said his alleged victim had not been raped because she was unmarried and the attacker had impersonated her boyfriend after entering the dark bedroom where she slept.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
When Berto Solis and Nancy Thuvanuti met, nobody thought they would last, he remembers. She was a New Jersey girl with Thai and Irish roots, a fashionista streak and a family full of university graduates. He was "rough around the edges," he remembers, a Mexican American first in his family to go to college, a San Joaquin Valley transplant still trying to find himself. "Everyone was like, 'Her? Him?'" Solis said, now six years later. "But whenever we just let ourselves be, we said, 'I don't know what they're talking about.
NATIONAL
May 9, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Voters in North Carolina on Tuesday approved Amendment One, a fiercely debated and highly restrictive amendment to the state constitution that defines marriage as the legal union of a man and a woman. The amendment not only outlaws same-sex marriage - already illegal in the state - but bans civil unions and domestic partnerships for gay or straight couples. Family law experts say it will threaten domestic partnership health benefits for local government workers and strip unmarried couples, both gay and straight, of their rights to make financial or emergency medical decisions for an incapacitated partner.
WORLD
January 15, 2012 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
What's in a title? Plenty, according to French feminists who have persuaded a town to drop the honorific "mademoiselle" on official forms. From now on, the women of Cesson-Sevigne, population 16,000, will be addressed as "madame" regardless of age or marital status. "Mademoiselle," the Gallic form of "miss," is normally used for young, unmarried women, thus, feminists say, openly declaring them either available or unwanted in a way that men, always referred to as "monsieur," are not. A French form of "ms. " would solve the problem, but there you go.… Exactly when a woman reaches the age when she becomes a "madame," married or otherwise, is not only a matter of debate but a social minefield; women of a certain age will often ask themselves whether the waiter who calls them "mademoiselle" is being gallant or sarcastic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Judy Lewis, a psychotherapist and former actress who wrote a book about her complicated heritage as the illegitimate daughter of Hollywood legends Loretta Young and Clark Gable, has died. She was 76. A longtime resident of Los Angeles, Lewis died of cancer Friday in Gladwyne, Pa., according to her daughter, Maria Tinney Dagit. Brought up in Bel-Air as Young's adopted daughter, Lewis was an adult when she learned that the glamorous leading lady and Gable, the dashing star of " Gone With the Wind," had conceived her during a brief affair in the 1930s.
NATIONAL
November 15, 2011
— Catholic Charities announced Monday that it was ending its legal battle over Illinois' civil unions law and no longer was providing state-funded services. The move ends the group's long history in Illinois of providing foster care and adoptions. Catholic Charities held foster care contracts with the state for about four decades. The group had wished to continue its state contracts, while also referring unmarried couples who want to be adoptive or foster parents to other agencies, citing principles of religious liberty and freedom of conscience.
NEWS
December 25, 1987
The fallacious reasoning of the Rev. Lesley Northrup, the unmarried Episcopal priest, who--with her bishop's blessing--successfully inseminated herself with the semen of three donors chosen by her (two of whom were also priests) is obvious ("A Female Priest's Unusual Route to Parenthood" by Marjorie Hyer, the Washington Post, Dec. 15). One of these men is the father of the child--just as surely as if he deposited his semen within her through sexual intercourse. The unconscionable view that they apparently don't give a damn--nor does she--about the significance and obligations of their fatherhood is hardly a precept of any church worthy of the name.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2010 | By Matea Gold and Jordan Steffen, Tribune Washington Bureau
Aja Sutter is the kind of voter the Democrats could not afford to lose this year. The 26-year-old physical therapist, part of a cohort of unmarried women that has long been one of the most reliable Democratic bases, enthusiastically voted for Barack Obama in 2008. But in last week's midterm election, Sutter cast her ballot for Republicans, frustrated by the administration's lack of progress in righting the economy "A lot of the things that were promised, in my opinion, didn't happen, and I wasn't satisfied," said Sutter, who noted that many of her female friends, feeling let down and ignored by politicians, did not even bother to vote.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Rebecca Traister, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"If there's anything worse than being single, it's sitting around talking about being single," said Mary Richards, the 30-year-old who had ditched a commitment-phobic swain and headed to Minneapolis to work as a single television news producer. That was in the first episode of "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," which aired in 1970. For Mary, making it on her own may have been freeing, socially transgressive, practical, and even fun; but singlehood — as a way of life rather than unfortunate happenstance — certainly wasn't anything to crow about.
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