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Unorganized Crime

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014 | By David Ng
In 1989, actor Chazz Palminteri debuted his one-man show "A Bronx Tale" at a small theater on Hollywood Boulevard in Los Angeles. The modest play would later catch the attention of Robert De Niro, who turned it into a movie, which in turn helped to propel Palminteri's screen career. In May, Palminteri is set to debut a new play at another small theater in L.A. "Unorganized Crime," written by Kenny D'Aquila, will open at the Elephant Theatre in Hollywood's Theatre Row on May 1 for a three-week run through May 25. Preview performances are scheduled to begin April 26. "Unorganized Crime," which will be directed by David Fofi, tells the story of Gino (D'Aquila)
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014 | By David Ng
In 1989, actor Chazz Palminteri debuted his one-man show "A Bronx Tale" at a small theater on Hollywood Boulevard in Los Angeles. The modest play would later catch the attention of Robert De Niro, who turned it into a movie, which in turn helped to propel Palminteri's screen career. In May, Palminteri is set to debut a new play at another small theater in L.A. "Unorganized Crime," written by Kenny D'Aquila, will open at the Elephant Theatre in Hollywood's Theatre Row on May 1 for a three-week run through May 25. Preview performances are scheduled to begin April 26. "Unorganized Crime," which will be directed by David Fofi, tells the story of Gino (D'Aquila)
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Sharon Mizota
Pablo Bronstein's installation at REDCAT is a comically oversize living room. But unlike many architecturally inspired works, it isn't empty. A single performer, clad in a loose white blouse and black tights, maneuvers throughout the space from 3 to 6 p.m. daily. He or she methodically transforms the furniture - which is full of unexpected openings and dual uses - and performs a balletic dance. It's a startling, and quite beautiful, intervention that draws intriguing parallels between bodily movement and furniture design.
WORLD
January 1, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood
Almost everything to do with the Mexican government's war against drugs is wrong. Wrong, wrong, wrong. The threat from narco-trafficking is overblown. Fighting cartels won't stop the flow of illegal drugs or erase Mexican corruption. The real battle over drugs lies on the U.S. side of the border. That's the gist of a provocative new book that challenges virtually every premise on which Mexican President Felipe Calderon has based his 3-year-old offensive against drug cartels. "El Narco: La Guerra Fallida" ("Narco: The Failed War")
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | MARK EHRMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you haven't been keeping up with the trading card world, you may be surprised to learn that it's not all batting averages and touchdowns. And it certainly isn't all kid stuff. In fact, the real action is in non-sports cards. Rather than being dominated by mega-corporations with multimillion-dollar licensing agreements, this field is open to smaller, quirkier publishers whose themes run from the mainstream to the macabre.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California hardly put out the welcome mat for its earliest Russian settlers, who sold Fort Ross, their trading post north of San Francisco, for $30,000 in 1841 after the fur trade dried up and their crops withered in the ground. More than a century later, Russian Consul General Vladimir Kuznetsov isn't having much better luck prospecting in California, despite his political savvy and charm.
OPINION
October 4, 1992 | Joan Petersilia, Joan Petersilia is director of RAND's Criminal Justice Program and former president of the American Society of Criminology
Why don't prisons do more to lower the crime rate? Californians certainly seem to believe that the greater the number of jail cells, the safer they are. Since 1980, the state's prison pop ulation has grown 300%. Six percent of the state's general fund goes to corrections, up from 2% a decade ago. Yet, violent crime in California jumped 4.3% last year, according to the FBI. The short answer to this puzzle is that we ask too much of prisons.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Boss is decked out in a batik shirt, plaid pants, gold medallion belt buckle, gem-studded Rolex and gold wristband. To his right is a wooden statue of a cobra ready to strike, a gold sake cup resting in its mouth as a charm. The subject is the driver of The Boss' white Mercedes, the man's finger and how the driver sliced it off for having somehow failed his employer.
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