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Unqualified Teachers

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NEWS
September 22, 1985
Despite all the excuses given for the lack of qualified teachers being hired in Los Angeles County and throughout the country, the bottom line is this: There will be plenty of qualified teachers once we decide to pay them what they're worth. And this isn't likely to happen soon because, despite all our pious comments about children being our most precious commodity, in reality they're obviously not much of a priority at all. FRANK MALFITANO Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 6, 2009
Re "Failure gets a pass," May 3 I am so glad that The Times has written about this antiquated and ridiculous process that the LAUSD has for ridding itself of unqualified teachers. I'm afraid, however, that the article focused too much on "inappropriate" behavior by teachers (the obvious reasons for dismissal) and too little on just plain old bad teaching. Teachers who are consistently late or absent or who have obvious classroom management problems are known, but little or nothing is done.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1996
On poor teacher training and unqualified teachers: You get what you pay for! RICK JAMESON Valencia
OPINION
June 25, 2005
Re "City Control of Schools Advocated," June 18: As a retired Los Angeles Unified School District teacher, I am reluctant to see the end of an elected board of education and subsequent control over schools by Antonio Villaraigosa, the mayor soon to take office. However, something must be done. Recent policy measures passed by the LAUSD board are downright silly. How can it implement college preparation courses for all students when it can't even find staff for basic courses? It can't even find staff for enough college preparation courses for the students currently enrolled who would like to take such classes.
OPINION
April 18, 1999
Re "Class-Size Reduction Doesn't Benefit All," Commentary, April 7: Randy Ross believes that good teachers are looking for ways to get out of the low-income, poverty schools. He feels that class-size reduction has furthered the ability for good teachers to do just that. Maybe, instead of blaming class-size reduction or even poverty, Ross should take a long, hard look at why those teachers want out. Most low-income, poverty schools have plenty of money to spend on their students, thanks to federal funding, but money is not always the answer.
OPINION
June 25, 2005
Re "City Control of Schools Advocated," June 18: As a retired Los Angeles Unified School District teacher, I am reluctant to see the end of an elected board of education and subsequent control over schools by Antonio Villaraigosa, the mayor soon to take office. However, something must be done. Recent policy measures passed by the LAUSD board are downright silly. How can it implement college preparation courses for all students when it can't even find staff for basic courses? It can't even find staff for enough college preparation courses for the students currently enrolled who would like to take such classes.
OPINION
September 29, 1996
The irrelevance of the teacher education programs discussed in Denis P. Doyle's commentary ("Schools of Education Are Relics of the Past," Sept. 20) strikes a resounding chord. Institutions must understand a teacher's need to be in the trenches--from day one. Those who choose to teach in a specific area must master their subject, while interning with several teachers and schools in order to increase their exposure to different teaching and learning styles, as well as socioeconomic back- grounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1994
I just finished reading "Fledgling Instructors Try to Ease Staff Shortage" (Sept. 4). I was surprised to find that so many vacancies were filled by unqualified teachers. One month ago I called the Los Angeles Unified School District to request an application for special education teacher. I have three California teaching credentials and have taught in all areas of special education. I was told that there were no available positions, not even for substitutes. If "the district anticipates needing more than 300 special education teachers and probably will have substitutes fill most of those positions," why was I so easily dismissed?
OPINION
May 6, 2009
Re "Failure gets a pass," May 3 I am so glad that The Times has written about this antiquated and ridiculous process that the LAUSD has for ridding itself of unqualified teachers. I'm afraid, however, that the article focused too much on "inappropriate" behavior by teachers (the obvious reasons for dismissal) and too little on just plain old bad teaching. Teachers who are consistently late or absent or who have obvious classroom management problems are known, but little or nothing is done.
OPINION
December 26, 2001
Re "Congress OKs Overhaul of Public Schools," Dec. 19: New mandates from Congress to improve education fit Shakespeare's line, "It is a tale, told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing." Why? Because there is not one word in the new mandates about lowering class size. Classes in California are the largest in the nation. I teach five middle school classes of 33 to 38 children every day. You may not hold me accountable for their progress until class size is cut in half.
OPINION
April 18, 1999
Re "Class-Size Reduction Doesn't Benefit All," Commentary, April 7: Randy Ross believes that good teachers are looking for ways to get out of the low-income, poverty schools. He feels that class-size reduction has furthered the ability for good teachers to do just that. Maybe, instead of blaming class-size reduction or even poverty, Ross should take a long, hard look at why those teachers want out. Most low-income, poverty schools have plenty of money to spend on their students, thanks to federal funding, but money is not always the answer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1996
On poor teacher training and unqualified teachers: You get what you pay for! RICK JAMESON Valencia
OPINION
September 29, 1996
The irrelevance of the teacher education programs discussed in Denis P. Doyle's commentary ("Schools of Education Are Relics of the Past," Sept. 20) strikes a resounding chord. Institutions must understand a teacher's need to be in the trenches--from day one. Those who choose to teach in a specific area must master their subject, while interning with several teachers and schools in order to increase their exposure to different teaching and learning styles, as well as socioeconomic back- grounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1994
I just finished reading "Fledgling Instructors Try to Ease Staff Shortage" (Sept. 4). I was surprised to find that so many vacancies were filled by unqualified teachers. One month ago I called the Los Angeles Unified School District to request an application for special education teacher. I have three California teaching credentials and have taught in all areas of special education. I was told that there were no available positions, not even for substitutes. If "the district anticipates needing more than 300 special education teachers and probably will have substitutes fill most of those positions," why was I so easily dismissed?
NEWS
September 22, 1985
It would not have been out of order to have written the headline as "Some New and Old Teachers Are Called 'Unqualified.' " I have serious reservations (about the possibility) that the Los Angeles School District and the California teacher credentialing commission will illuminate the concept of the performance of a teacher--credentialed or not--when they complete their joint study. My skepticism is composed mainly of experience with similar efforts (albeit on a smaller scale)
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