Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnruh
IN THE NEWS

Unruh

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 5, 1985 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and JERRY GILLAM, Times Staff Writers
State Treasurer Jesse M. Unruh disclosed Monday that he received almost $9,000 in gifts and free travel last year but said his accounting is incomplete because he is too busy conducting state business on the East Coast to finish the report. In addition, Unruh said he did not report the value of a two-week cruise on a private yacht in the Mediterranean because he cannot estimate the value of the trip.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
When Kathleen Nolen approached architect Tony Unruh about restoring her 1941 Silver Lake home by Midcentury great Gregory Ain, Unruh said he viewed the project as “bringing this masterpiece into the 21st century.” For Ain, who grew up in Lincoln Heights and is best known for designing modern, affordable housing, the original assignment wasn't so easy. He was commissioned to build the Orans House, as it is known, on a small, steep site surrounded by homes.  “He designed the house to step up the hill with sightlines that would avoid the view of the houses below and a living room with full glass panels to the backyard,” Unruh said.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
December 18, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
As Howard B. Unruh barricaded himself in his home against the police -- after finally running out of ammunition -- he got a call from an assistant city editor at a local newspaper who had looked up his phone number. “Why are you killing people?” asked the editor, Philip W. Buxton. “I don't know,” Unruh replied. “I can't answer that yet. I'll have to talk to you later. I'm too busy now.” It was 1949 in Camden, N.J., and Unruh had just killed 12 people and injured four others with a Luger pistol, including women and children.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
As Howard B. Unruh barricaded himself in his home against the police -- after finally running out of ammunition -- he got a call from an assistant city editor at a local newspaper who had looked up his phone number. “Why are you killing people?” asked the editor, Philip W. Buxton. “I don't know,” Unruh replied. “I can't answer that yet. I'll have to talk to you later. I'm too busy now.” It was 1949 in Camden, N.J., and Unruh had just killed 12 people and injured four others with a Luger pistol, including women and children.
MAGAZINE
November 1, 1992
Jones' attempted indictment of the California Legislature and everyone who ever had anything to do with politics demonstrated a new spirit of venal assertive ignorance of California's history and the people who shaped that history. He calls Unruh, who served with courage and strength as speaker of the state Assembly and as state treasurer, "driven and evil." This about a man who authored the most far-reaching legislation in California's history affecting civil rights, consumer credit, fair housing and a host of other important issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1986
The recent articles in The Times about State Treasurer Jesse Unruh seem to infer a connection between his political fund-raising and the manner in which he performs his duties as state treasurer. The articles focused on relations with bond firms and implied that Unruh's transactions may be colored by favoritism. It should be noted that his responsibilities also extend widely to the public higher education sector of California and for us he has always been an altruistic public servant.
NEWS
July 10, 1987 | From United Press International
State Treasurer Jesse Unruh has been a patient at UCLA Medical Center for the last two weeks undergoing "routine" treatment for prostate cancer, officials announced Thursday. Doctors at the hospital were changing the doses of medication prescribed as treatment for the cancer that Unruh has been battling for three years, said his press secretary, Christina Youngblood. "There is no crisis," Youngblood said. "This is a fairly routine practice."
NEWS
August 5, 1987
Jesse Unruh was never at a loss for words. Here are some of his more memorable ones: "Money is the mother's milk of politics." "What I say to these people (potential campaign contributors) is, 'We've got a certain amount of business to give. I've got a campaign to run. If I have to pick and choose, I'm going to pick my friends.' " "This is my dilemma: If I had stayed away from the lobbyists, I would have been ineffective. If I take their money and give them nothing for it, I am a cheat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1987
Jesse M. Unruh's name seldom appeared in print far from the word powerful ; it suited well his politics, his physique and his personality. In the mid-1960s his politics and 290-pound physique earned him the unflattering title Big Daddy after he locked up the Assembly, of which he was the Speaker, until it did as he demanded: vote on a budget. His personality later led him to reflect that it was a big mistake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1987
I cannot let the passing of Jesse Unruh go by without acknowledging what he did for me through his legislation. As a struggling graduate student in social work 22 years ago, I was attending San Diego State College right on the heels of the Watts Riots. All of the state universities were colleges then. I faced discrimination in securing housing close to the campus solely due to my race. In those days racism was overt and tangible. When I discovered the provisions of the Unruh Civil Rights Act, it was like playing monopoly because for each rejection that one could prove from an apartment based on race, one could collect $250 in damages.
HOME & GARDEN
January 27, 2010 | By Lauren Beale
Singer-songwriter-guitarist Kevin Griffin of the alternative rock band Better Than Ezra has listed his Silver Lake home for $1.65 million. The Tony Unruh-designed steel, glass and wood house has expanses of windows, decks on two levels and city light views, blurring the distinction between the indoors and the outdoors. When Griffin and his wife, Laurel, bought the multistory house in 2006 for $1,595,000, they felt fortunate to find it. "We moved here after the hurricane in New Orleans," Kevin Griffin said.
BOOKS
November 18, 2007 | Peter Schrag, Peter Schrag, a columnist and former editorial page editor of the Sacramento Bee, is the author, most recently, of "California: America's High Stakes Experiment."
It's been a long time since Jesse M. "Big Daddy" Unruh was a household name in California politics. Unruh was, as the cliche goes, "the powerful speaker" of the state Assembly from 1961 to 1969, candidate for governor in 1970 -- he lost to then-Gov. Ronald Reagan by 500,000 votes -- and state treasurer from 1975 until his death in 1987. So why would anyone want to write Unruh's biography now?
OPINION
November 12, 2007 | Bill Boyarsky, Bill Boyarsky, a former city editor and columnist for The Times, teaches journalism at USC and is the author of the just-published "Big Daddy: Jesse Unruh and the Art of Power Politics."
If ethnic relations in Los Angeles seem tense now, it is enlightening to know how much worse they were in the segregated, racist L.A. of post-World War II, when Jesse M. Unruh, an overweight, angry GI Bill vet, enrolled at the University of Southern California. Eventually, Unruh went on to hold state political offices and, for a time, was the most powerful politician in California. He was part of a generation of visionaries that included former governors Earl Warren and Edmund G. Brown Sr.
NEWS
October 3, 1999 | MELANIE BURNEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The sounds of that September morning still haunt Charles Cohen. The pounding feet on the apartment stairs. His mother screaming, "Hide, Charles! Hide!" The bullets streaming from Howard Unruh's gun. The terrified 12-year-old dove into a closet as Unruh stalked the streets and shops of his East Camden neighborhood--and then the Cohens' apartment--in a 12-minute shooting spree that came to be called the "Walk of Death."
BUSINESS
June 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
James A. Unruh on Thursday became the second chief executive to leave Unisys Corp. without turning it into the computer giant many have sought to create. Unruh, 56, said he will stay on as CEO until a successor is named. He plans to relinquish his post as chairman by April 1998. "It has become increasingly clear to me that this is the right time for a change for both the company and for me personally," Unruh said. The company's largest stockholder, Greenway Partners, had sought his ouster.
NEWS
January 13, 1997
Larry Margolis, 73, the top aide to former Assembly Speaker Jesse M. Unruh. Margolis was considered so powerful when Unruh reigned in the 1960s that he was often referred to as "the 81st member" of the 80-member Assembly. In addition to helping create the Unruh Civil Rights Act, Margolis was also noted for turning the legislative staff into a professional cadre of policy experts independent of the executive branch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1986
Two Democrats, both approaching the status of institutions in Sacramento from different directions, seek reelection as constitutional officers on Nov. 4. We endorse the candidacies of Jesse M. Unruh for a third term as state treasurer and March Fong Eu for a fourth term as California's secretary of state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1996 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after voting to reduce Medicare spending, U.S. Rep. Elton Gallegly finds himself in a reelection contest against a 73-year-old retired high school teacher who utilizes the government insurance program. Indeed, Bob Unruhe, Gallegly's Democratic challenger, said his age and ties to the senior community will provide him with powerful ammunition against the Simi Valley Republican in Tuesday's election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1995 | SARAH KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until two years ago, Darlene Ticehurst believed what the United States government told her about her brother, an Air Force pilot whose plane apparently was shot down over North Korea in 1951. Though shocked and saddened at the news, she accepted a Department of Defense explanation that her only brother had disappeared on a mission and was presumed dead.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|