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Unscrupulous Employers

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BUSINESS
May 2, 2004
I know that there are unscrupulous employers out there, just as there are unscrupulous employees ("Feeling Injured Workers' Pain," April 24). But I start to wonder where the problem lies when our company of about 135 employees pays $215,836 a year for workers compensation insurance, but if we moved all our employees to our Atlanta facility we would pay $72,381, or to our Fort Worth plant and we would pay $48,716. These numbers lead me to believe that reform is needed. If insurers are leaving our state because they are not making enough money, but they are not leaving other states, and our employees receive some of the worst benefits, where does all the money go?
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BUSINESS
September 28, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Monday vetoed a pair of bills aimed at curbing theft by employers of wages paid to hourly workers. The most controversial of the two measures, backed by the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation, would have created a new misdemeanor crime for employers that willfully fail to pay all wages within 90 days after a worker leaves. A second bill would have increased the maximum amount of damages that a worker could be awarded in a wage-related legal dispute or state enforcement action.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2000
Re "Unionizing Is Catch-22 for Illegal Immigrants," Jan. 16: Employers know that immigrants who are vulnerable to deportation are vulnerable to exploitation, and they are often willing to take advantage of that fact. But the solution is not to threaten to fine or punish employers more--they'll just go to greater lengths to keep their workers underground. The solution lies in the kind of victory we saw in the Holiday Inn Express case, where low-income immigrant women stood up for their right to unionize, despite their undocumented status.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2004
I know that there are unscrupulous employers out there, just as there are unscrupulous employees ("Feeling Injured Workers' Pain," April 24). But I start to wonder where the problem lies when our company of about 135 employees pays $215,836 a year for workers compensation insurance, but if we moved all our employees to our Atlanta facility we would pay $72,381, or to our Fort Worth plant and we would pay $48,716. These numbers lead me to believe that reform is needed. If insurers are leaving our state because they are not making enough money, but they are not leaving other states, and our employees receive some of the worst benefits, where does all the money go?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994
Wednesday's Orange County section had a couple of pieces dealing with illegal immigration. They had to do with (Assemblyman) Tom Umberg's recently proposed legislation, AB 2404, to penalize employers who hire undocumented workers. What really irritates me are some of the spurious arguments foisted on us by the employers and immigrants-rights groups. The agriculture industry raises the specter of discrimination against workers here legally solely based on appearance. Hogwash!
BUSINESS
September 28, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Monday vetoed a pair of bills aimed at curbing theft by employers of wages paid to hourly workers. The most controversial of the two measures, backed by the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation, would have created a new misdemeanor crime for employers that willfully fail to pay all wages within 90 days after a worker leaves. A second bill would have increased the maximum amount of damages that a worker could be awarded in a wage-related legal dispute or state enforcement action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1987
The powerful moral imperative for a generous U.S. immigration and refugee policy and for a humane and comprehensive legalization program must not become a mask for misleading employer claims of a labor shortage! ("Amnesty Woes Snag L.A. Garment Trade," June 14.) All too many employers have become intoxicated over the years with what they perceived as open access to a docile, highly vulnerable, easily exploitable, readily expendable labor source. Others have simply adapted to a competitive labor market dominated and shaped by the greediest and most unscrupulous employers among them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1993
Re "Plan for National Guard at Border Gains Support," Oct. 19: Illegal immigration policy has become a hot issue for making news in these hard economic times. Patrolling the border (U.S.-Mexico) is only an excuse by politicians to gain a few "brownie points." Get real. Making the illegal immigrant a scape-goat is not the solution, especially in the Southwest. The real source of the issue is U.S.-Mexican relations or the lack of it. Real policy should be worked out with Mexican officials who share border responsibility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1993 | TOM UMBERG, Assemblyman Tom Umberg (D-Garden Grove) represents the 69th District. and
Californians are becoming increasingly frustrated with their government's inability to control the flow of illegal migration into California. With 30% of the nation's illegal immigrants within our borders, California has borne a disproportionate share of the nation's immigration burden. Certainly, governmental services have been strained. The poor economy and shrinking local and state tax revenues have exacerbated the problems and heightened frustrations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1994 | TOM UMBERG, Assemblyman Tom Umberg (D-Garden Grove) represents the 69th District. and
Californians are becoming increasingly frustrated with their government's inability to control the flow of illegal immigration into California. With 30% of the nation's illegal immigrants within our borders, California has borne a disproportionate share of the nation's immigration burden. Certainly, governmental services have been strained. The poor economy and shrinking local and state tax revenues have exacerbated the problems and heightened frustrations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2000
Re "Unionizing Is Catch-22 for Illegal Immigrants," Jan. 16: Employers know that immigrants who are vulnerable to deportation are vulnerable to exploitation, and they are often willing to take advantage of that fact. But the solution is not to threaten to fine or punish employers more--they'll just go to greater lengths to keep their workers underground. The solution lies in the kind of victory we saw in the Holiday Inn Express case, where low-income immigrant women stood up for their right to unionize, despite their undocumented status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1994
Wednesday's Orange County section had a couple of pieces dealing with illegal immigration. They had to do with (Assemblyman) Tom Umberg's recently proposed legislation, AB 2404, to penalize employers who hire undocumented workers. What really irritates me are some of the spurious arguments foisted on us by the employers and immigrants-rights groups. The agriculture industry raises the specter of discrimination against workers here legally solely based on appearance. Hogwash!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1994 | TOM UMBERG, Assemblyman Tom Umberg (D-Garden Grove) represents the 69th District. and
Californians are becoming increasingly frustrated with their government's inability to control the flow of illegal immigration into California. With 30% of the nation's illegal immigrants within our borders, California has borne a disproportionate share of the nation's immigration burden. Certainly, governmental services have been strained. The poor economy and shrinking local and state tax revenues have exacerbated the problems and heightened frustrations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1993
Re "Plan for National Guard at Border Gains Support," Oct. 19: Illegal immigration policy has become a hot issue for making news in these hard economic times. Patrolling the border (U.S.-Mexico) is only an excuse by politicians to gain a few "brownie points." Get real. Making the illegal immigrant a scape-goat is not the solution, especially in the Southwest. The real source of the issue is U.S.-Mexican relations or the lack of it. Real policy should be worked out with Mexican officials who share border responsibility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1993 | TOM UMBERG, Assemblyman Tom Umberg (D-Garden Grove) represents the 69th District. and
Californians are becoming increasingly frustrated with their government's inability to control the flow of illegal migration into California. With 30% of the nation's illegal immigrants within our borders, California has borne a disproportionate share of the nation's immigration burden. Certainly, governmental services have been strained. The poor economy and shrinking local and state tax revenues have exacerbated the problems and heightened frustrations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1987
The powerful moral imperative for a generous U.S. immigration and refugee policy and for a humane and comprehensive legalization program must not become a mask for misleading employer claims of a labor shortage! ("Amnesty Woes Snag L.A. Garment Trade," June 14.) All too many employers have become intoxicated over the years with what they perceived as open access to a docile, highly vulnerable, easily exploitable, readily expendable labor source. Others have simply adapted to a competitive labor market dominated and shaped by the greediest and most unscrupulous employers among them.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1992
The article neglected to mention an abuse the present workers' comp anti-fraud climate is fueling in Southern California. Unscrupulous employers feel empowered to threaten employees to retract their claims for legitimate on-the-job injuries. Employees who do not obey these demands may find themselves victimized by their employer. JANE NORLANDER Glendale
OPINION
June 24, 2011 | By Harold Meyerson
Nearly every day for three years, Josue Melquisedec Diaz reported to work by going to a New Orleans street corner where contractors, subcontractors and people fixing up their places went to hire day laborers. It was there, one day in 2008, that a contractor picked him up and took him to Beaumont, Texas, just across the Louisiana line, to work on the cleanup, demolition and reconstruction projects that Beaumont was undertaking in the wake of Hurricane Gustav. Diaz was put to work in a residential neighborhood that had been flooded.
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