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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992
The expense of rebuilding areas torched by rioters can be reduced by sentencing each firebug and looter to join a work crew and appear daily until the city is restored. Unskilled workers could learn a trade that would lift them into the salaried class after their sentences have been completed. HENRY RAUB Independence
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WORLD
December 4, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Kazuo Okawa's luckless career as a "nuclear gypsy" began one night at a poker game. The year was 1992, and jobs were scarce in this farming town in the shadow of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. An unemployed Okawa gambled and drank a lot. He was dealing cards when a stranger made him an offer: manage a crew of unskilled workers at the nearby plant. "Just gather a team of young guys and show up at the front gate; I'll tell you what to do," instructed the man, who Okawa later learned was a recruiter for a local job subcontracting firm.
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OPINION
March 21, 2002
The rising congressional tide against amnesty for some 8.7 million illegal aliens is proof that lawmakers are increasingly skeptical of beguiling statements from people like Frank del Olmo who characterize this controversy as "the INS spending way too much time and effort chasing down Mexican busboys and farm workers" (Commentary, March 17). The blanket amnesty sought by Mexican President Vicente Fox makes no sense for the U.S. By and large, amnesty applies to illegal Mexican workers who are overwhelmingly unskilled.
TRAVEL
January 17, 2010 | By John Flinn
High over kingdom come, Candice Bednar, a mother of three from Connecticut, is clinging to the unnervingly vertical face of a rock spire called Nimbus Tower. Bednar, 40, is the unlikeliest of rock jocks: She doesn't have Popeye-sized forearms, a devil-may-care attitude about great heights or the names of Sherpas in her Friends and Family Plan. She's never even set foot in a rock-climbing gym. Instead of pulling herself up by tiny finger- and toeholds, Bednar is ascending something called a via ferrata , Italian for "iron road."
OPINION
July 29, 1990
Perhaps the most unsettling statistic in the first of your series on "Poverty in America" was the decline, in constant dollars, of the average hourly wage since 1978. When will our bureaucrats in Washington see that the constant influx of unskilled low-paid workers made possible by our lax immigration laws is having the effect of reducing hourly wages for all Americans. It is time we shut the floodgate and reduce the supply of low-skilled workers. This would necessarily result in an increased demand for our own unskilled poor, with the unavoidable, but salutary, effect of an increase in their hourly wages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1993
"Grim Picture Painted for State's Black Men" (Dec. 11) illustrates the warped judgment of today's liberal mind-set. The study referenced in the article states that: 1) Black males are three times more likely to drop out of school. 2) Unskilled black males are less likely to get a job than unskilled white males. 3) Educated black males are equally likely to get a job as an educated white male. In typical liberal fashion, the main conclusion of the article was that unskilled blacks are being discriminated against.
OPINION
October 13, 1991
You've painted a dismal picture for Filipino expatriates seeking a better life outside the Philippines. However, you omitted an important fact: Not all Filipinos are maids or unskilled workers. My grandparents came here as college professors at Columbia University; my parents, uncles, aunts, cousins and siblings are doctors, lawyers, nurses and business persons. And I am a second-generation American working in Orange County as a physician. There is not a maid among us. OSMUNDO R. SAGUIL, Long Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1995
Re "Don't Open the Door to Guest Workers," by Rep. Howard Berman, Commentary, July 13: Berman feels there is a surplus of workers willing to toil on U.S. farms. What he fails to recognize is that many unskilled workers are not willing to perform these back-breaking tasks in the harsh elements sometimes provided by Mother Nature. Even if they were, do you really think they will do it for minimum wages? No, they will want more money because it's hard work. It's easier to work at McDonald's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1988
By moving the minimum wage closer to what might constitute a livable income, perhaps there will be more incentive for those who really want to work to find a job instead of relying on welfare support or criminal activities. This action will also allow unskilled laborers a better chance to acquire job experience and become more vital members of the community. The additional 90 cents an hour clearly means a lot more to someone trying to survive in California on $134 per week than to California consumers and employers who seem relatively affluent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1994
Hurrah for Peter Dreier and Richard Rothstein's Column Left ("Man-Made Disasters' Double Punch," Jan. 21). They're so right: We shell out billions for the victims of earthquakes, fires and other natural disasters, but turn a deaf ear to the cries from our millions of unemployed. And these include engineers and technicians who could lead in repairing our bridges, roads and other parts of our sagging infrastructure. Many of us old-timers remember how Roosevelt created the WPA (Works Progress Administration)
BUSINESS
September 14, 2008 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
I don't have a green thumb. When little plants misbehave, their parents threaten to send them to my yard. But with supermarket prices for produce on the rise, it seemed a good time to try, yet again, to grow a vegetable garden. And I wouldn't be alone. According to the National Garden Assn., hard times seed more gardens. "The high point we had was in 1975, 1976, when there was a gas crisis and Gerald Ford had his Whip Inflation Now program," said Bruce Butterfield, research director for the association, which has been tracking gardening since 1973.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2008 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
Eight miles north of the maritime border with Mexico, in waters a mile and a half deep, Shell Oil Co. is constructing the most ambitious offshore oil platform ever attempted in the Gulf of Mexico. As tall as the Eiffel Tower, the floating production facility will be anchored to the ocean floor by moorings spanning an area the size of downtown Houston.
OPINION
May 31, 2007
Re "Amnesty isn't a dirty word," Opinion, May 28 Gregory Rodriguez argues that amnesty can have beneficial societal impacts, such as when Richard Nixon was pardoned and the Vietnam draft dodgers were granted amnesty. In these cases there was an arguable benefit, although controversial at the time. What makes amnesty for illegal immigrants different and objectionable to many Americans is that it is an incentive to continued illegal immigration to secure the rights afforded by this amnesty bill, or the next, or the one after that.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2006 | David Streitfeld, Times Staff Writer
Shortly after dawn, the day laborers began gathering beneath a San Diego Freeway overpass in West Los Angeles. A house painter pulled up in a pickup, looking for an assistant. He offered $12 an hour. A worker jumped in. Next to arrive was a white-haired woman driving a Honda. Her garden needed a makeover. She'd pay $11 an hour. She departed with a second worker. On the freeway above, commuters were heading to offices in Century City and El Segundo. Down here, at the West L.A.
OPINION
May 15, 2006 | Tyler Cowen and Daniel M. Rothschild, TYLER COWEN is a professor of economics at George Mason University and director of its Mercatus Center. DANIEL M. ROTHSCHILD is a researcher at the Mercatus Center.
GOOGLE, YAHOO and Sun Microsystems were all founded by immigrants -- from Russia, Taiwan and India, respectively. There is near-universal agreement that skilled immigrants are an enormous boon to the American economy. But what about the millions of unskilled laborers who arrive in this country every year? Recent public discourse would have us believe that they poach American jobs, lower wages and sponge off welfare.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2003 | Peter G. Gosselin, Times Staff Writer
America emerged from its last binge of "offshoring" with a comforting story about how it could win in the great global reshuffling of labor. Promoted by then-candidate Bill Clinton in the early 1990s and embellished by a slew of tech gurus, the story said that we could afford to lose jobs to countries such as Mexico and Taiwan because most involved low-skill "muscle" work -- the departure of which would free us up for what really mattered, namely high-skill "mind" work.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1988
I must take exception to the views of Ivan Png and Eric Rasmusen. It is clearly their view, and the view of business in general, that a higher minimum wage will hurt our economy. But an increased minimum wage would reduce high turnover rates and the need for continued retraining of new employees. In the Northeast, many jobs requiring unskilled labor pay above $5 an hour. Many fast-food restaurants in the area now pay $6 an hour. The reason for this is not the kind heart of employers but short supply of labor.
OPINION
April 6, 2003
Re "A Recalculation of the Worth of Teachers," March 16: I find it insulting the way many people use the length of the school year to justify teachers' low salaries. If teachers were unskilled baby-sitters who passively sat in classrooms and watched students pass the time, perhaps it would be reasonable to pay them based on the number of hours worked. In reality, however, teachers are highly educated and are expected to offer challenging curriculum and instruction, maintain order, motivate and guide students, and tailor daily activities to meet individual needs in diverse and overcrowded classrooms.
OPINION
April 6, 2003
Re "A Recalculation of the Worth of Teachers," March 16: I find it insulting the way many people use the length of the school year to justify teachers' low salaries. If teachers were unskilled baby-sitters who passively sat in classrooms and watched students pass the time, perhaps it would be reasonable to pay them based on the number of hours worked. In reality, however, teachers are highly educated and are expected to offer challenging curriculum and instruction, maintain order, motivate and guide students, and tailor daily activities to meet individual needs in diverse and overcrowded classrooms.
OPINION
March 21, 2002
The rising congressional tide against amnesty for some 8.7 million illegal aliens is proof that lawmakers are increasingly skeptical of beguiling statements from people like Frank del Olmo who characterize this controversy as "the INS spending way too much time and effort chasing down Mexican busboys and farm workers" (Commentary, March 17). The blanket amnesty sought by Mexican President Vicente Fox makes no sense for the U.S. By and large, amnesty applies to illegal Mexican workers who are overwhelmingly unskilled.
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