Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnsung
IN THE NEWS

Unsung

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2006
Thank you for recognizing the contribution of my grandfather, William H. Daniels, on the front page of your Hollywood commemorative section [May 21] and the caption inside that described him as an "unsung hero." Daniels was director of photography on most of Garbo's U.S. films. Plus Erich von Stroheim's "Foolish Wives" and "Greed," "Dinner at Eight," "Winchester '73," "Ocean's Eleven," "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" and "Valley of the Dolls" -- where, reportedly, director Mark Robson wanted a cinematographer who could replicate the '30s glamour look and was told, "Bill Daniels was doing it in the '30s."
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 11, 2014
Re "New details on shooting at station," April 9 The Times quotes Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck as saying, in regard to the shooting this week at a police station: "By the grace of God, the suspect did not come in with the assault weapons that he has had access to. " While I also am grateful that an assault weapon was not the shooter's firearm of choice, I believe that, with all due respect to Beck, it was not a god who saved lives...
Advertisement
MAGAZINE
April 16, 2000
As head writer for the Rugrats television series and one of many writers to work on "Rugrats in Paris-The Movie," I was distressed to read in "Birth of a Nickelodeon Nation" (by Irene Lacher, special Hollywood issue, March 26) that Susan Sarandon, John Lithgow and Debbie Reynolds will provide the voices of the "preternaturally eloquent babies" in the film. These fine actors play adults in the film. The voices of the babies will belong to--and have always belonged to--a group of actors who are often unseen but should not be unsung: Christine Cavanaugh (as Chuckie)
SPORTS
September 7, 2013 | By Tim Hubbard
In the early years of fantasy baseball, Rickey Henderson was a god. His combination of speed and power, unrivaled at the time, gave his owners a huge advantage. Staff writer Tim Hubbard looks at a few lesser-known players who provide the best of both worlds. Carlos Gomez OF | Milwaukee There's much to be said about the other "CarGo. " Gomez has gone from being a solid defender who could swipe a bag to a fantasy stud in the mold of the original "CarGo," Colorado's Carlos Gonzalez.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2010 | By Maria Elena Fernandez
When a boss goes undercover for CBS, he doesn't choose where he is going to work or who is going to train him. In fact, in most instances, the nudge to participate in a reality TV show actually comes from the public relations department. But what about the personal interactions between the "Undercover Boss" and his unsuspecting working-class employees? When Waste Management's president and chief operations officer, Larry O'Donnell, took the time to learn how an office manager balanced her four different positions, was that for real?
HOME & GARDEN
July 31, 2003
What an amazing article on Coy Howard ("His Transcendent Vision" (July 17). He is one of this community's unsung treasures, and it is fitting to have such a caring piece on him and generous pictures of the wonderful Palevsky house. Fred Fisher Los Angeles Fred Fisher is the principal of Frederick Fisher and Partners, Architects.
SPORTS
October 5, 1991
Norm Charlton didn't pay Mike Scioscia the ultimate compliment by beaning him. Jim Murray owns that distinction by writing a column on the Dodgers' workhorse catcher and unsung hero. I guess some dogs do have their day. TOM CONNELLY Thousand Oaks
MAGAZINE
November 11, 1990
Scorsese professes affection for "The Naked Kiss" and its startling opening sequence. True to the auteurist party line, he credits directors Sam Fuller while failing to mention other key contributors to the scene's visceral impact: Stanley Cortez and his bravura camera work, the fierce, fearless acting of Constance Towers and particularly the frenzied, full-throttle jazz music of brilliant, unsung movie composer Paul Dunlap. Let us not forget that it takes more than one artist's passion to create a film canvas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991
As an alumnus of Garfield High School class of 1973, I was greatly saddened by the announcement that Escalante would be vacating his teaching position. Escalante was more than a teacher, he was an inspiration to his students and to the teaching community. He is a shining example of what teaching can be and should be: challenging and exciting. Garfield High School in East Los Angeles, which is predominantly Latino, became the focus of national attention thanks to the biographical movie "Stand and Deliver."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2001
As I read your recent stories about Rep. Gary Condit (D-Ceres) my hopes for mankind plummeted. He is one of our leaders. Yet he lied and cheated not only the public but also his own family. He put no one and nothing ahead of his desires and political ambitions. But then I read of Salvador Uribe ("Recalling a Life of Honor and Strength," Aug. 24), the cattle boss at Rancho Mission Viejo who, even though he could not swim, plunged into a pond to save his nephew and, in doing so, drowned.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Casting directors, the largely unsung heroes of the film and TV business, enjoy a warm, deserving close-up in the highly watchable documentary "Casting By," in theaters for a quick run before its HBO premiere next month. Directed by Tom Donahue, the movie, jampacked with evocative film clips, archival footage and interviews with a who's who of actors and filmmakers (Clint Eastwood, Robert Redford, Woody Allen, Glenn Close, Al Pacino, Martin Scorsese and Bette Midler are but a few)
SPORTS
July 14, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
CLERMONT, Fla. - The ring sits in a black box at the bottom of a tan ostrich-skin briefcase, the contents of which have been unchanged for two decades. This was Tim Crews' briefcase. It once accompanied him to Dodger Stadium. Now it sits buried in the back of a closet, under some clothes, from where it is gently removed and carefully unlocked only on special occasions. Laurie Crews places the briefcase on a coffee table, slowly runs her hands over its faded leather, and asks her youngest son Travis to open it. It's the 25th anniversary of her late husband's greatest triumph.
TRAVEL
July 7, 2013
True meaning of Gettysburg The words in the article on Gettysburg touched me deeply ["A Town That Never Forgets" by Catharine Hamm, June 30]. The heart-wrenching graphic details brought an important time in our country's history to life for me. And the closing words, "Nearly 54,000 days after Lincoln's death, this country is still alive," filled me with pride. Thank you for a wonderful tribute. Lora Crommett San Marcos Your story about what happened seven score and 10 years ago is timely, as we mark the Fourth of July and empower new leadership in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The lively and entertaining documentary "The Girls in the Band" sheds long overdue light on the many unsung female jazz instrumentalists of the 1930s and 1940s. Director Judy Chaikin, who co-wrote the film with its deft editor, Edward Osei-Gyimah, infuses this fine portrait with grace, nostalgia and a well-calibrated dose of social commentary. A close-up on Art Kane's iconic 1958 photograph "A Great Day in Harlem," which featured a cascade of top jazz artists - only three of whom were women (including pianists Mary Lou Williams and Marian McPartland)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Raise a pint to Reg Presley, the singer and co-founder of the Troggs, who died Monday at age 71 after a battle with lung cancer. Yes, of course, stand at attention for the band's mega-hit, “Wild Thing,” and for the primal pleasures of its three-chords-and-a-yowl philosophy.  But please, dig deeper, because the Troggs (born in the early 1960s in Andover, England) at their best were one of the most primal of the early garage rock bands, a dangerously regressive bunch of thug-rockers whose attitude on love, life and their place in the world helped spawn an entire movement.
SPORTS
April 24, 2012 | Helene Elliott
The gospel of successful playoff hockey, according to Kings Coach Darryl Sutter, is indisputable. "Goaltenders, special teams, top players, unsung heroes and discipline. Write it down and don't forget it," he said. "It's true. It's part of the hockey bible. I've seen it for 35 years, live. " He saw it again during their five-game elimination of the top-seeded Vancouver Canucks, a series the Kings ended Sunday with a 2-1 overtime victory at Rogers Arena. Kings goalie Jonathan Quick was better than Vancouver's Roberto Luongo and Cory Schneider, compiling a 1.59 goals-against average and .953 save percentage.
NEWS
May 28, 1989
Nothing could have pleased me more than reading the Willie Bogan story ("Glory Redux" by Nikki Finke, May 16). It was, in fact, a thrilling read, and a reminder of the old, glory days when poor but hard-working and ambitious black American parents--as many still do today--inspired their children to seek higher education "as a way out" and when those children, motivated by their parents, became academic All-Americans, or students first, athletes second....
OPINION
April 8, 2012 | By Eyal Press
Twenty years ago last week, Serbian snipers fired on a crowd of unarmed demonstrators in Sarajevo, launching a brutal siege that brought ethnic violence in the Balkans to menacing new heights. In the two decades since, attention has understandably focused on the deeds of the architects and perpetrators of the Balkan wars. Confronting the truth about how the violence was planned and orchestrated, many have argued, is an essential step in getting formerly warring factions to reckon honestly with their responsibility for what transpired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2011 | By Martha Groves
To the cognoscenti, Edward H. Fickett was the award-winning architect behind the Port of Los Angeles, La Costa Resort & Spa, Edwards Air Force Base and tens of thousands of airy, affordable tract homes throughout Southern California. To Better Homes & Gardens, he was the " Frank Lloyd Wright of the '50s" -- a visionary who designed mansions for the likes of Joan Crawford and Groucho Marx, and more modest accommodations for regular folks. But to Joycie Fickett, he was simply Eddie, the handsome, life-of-the-party husband who greeted her each morning with an original love song and breakfast in bed. "We laughed every day of our lives together," she said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|