Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUntold Story
IN THE NEWS

Untold Story

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2011
A Singular Woman The Untold Story of Barack Obama's Mother Janny Scott Riverhead: 376 pp., $26.95
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The 1939 sailing of the German ship the St. Louis -- popularized in the book and movie "Voyage of the Damned" -- was a painful precursor to the Holocaust. Now, 75 years later, a November cruise will recall some of that ill-fated trip. The hopes of the 937 Jewish refugees who boarded the St. Louis in Hamburg, Germany, to flee Hitler's Nazi regime were dashed when their plan to land in Cuba and await transport to the U.S. was denied. The U.S. also didn't allow them to enter, and the ship was sent back to Europe.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2008
RE "6-Drug Combo Blamed," by Paul Lieberman, Feb. 7: The widespread misuse and abuse of prescribed medications is largely an untold story, one about which few have concern until a case like that of Heath Ledger comes into the public consciousness. Ledger appeared to have everything one could want and what few are fortunate enough to be granted: great looks, the ability to act and earn a spectacular amount of money, and the adulation of adoring fans. Even with all of these attributes, he was unable to live his life without vast pharmaceutical aids.
WORLD
January 7, 2014 | Kate Linthicum
Over cappuccino at a crowded conference on real estate in one of the world's last frontier markets, one investor turned to another and said breezily, "I'm here to get rich. " They had paid more than $2,000 each to attend panels with titles like "Futurescape in Myanmar" and "Opportunities in Hotels and Resorts. " The seminar's sponsors, which included a prominent local construction firm, handed out business cards and glossy brochures highlighting the shining new condos and shopping malls they hope to build.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2012 | By Laura Hudson
"Marvel Comics: The Untold Story" performs an act of what superhero comics fans might term "retcon" - or retroactive continuity - by returning to the beginning of the superhero industry and telling the tale again with a number of previously invisible heroes suddenly added to the story: the men and women who created superhero comics. Superhero comics has always been a bit of an oddball, a niche genre with a small but fiercely devoted fan base and a penchant for stories about flawed, outcast heroes who struggle not only to save the world but find their place in it. Sean Howe's book traces the byzantine histories of the colorful characters on the comics pages and in the Marvel offices, from the inception of the superhero in the 1930s through the modern era, and finds the real and the fictional equally laced with epic triumphs, tragic reversals of fortune, backstabbing and melodrama.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Although Estela Bravo's "Fidel: The Untold Story" is purely propaganda, a work of unabashed hero worship, it is nonetheless -- and likely inadvertently -- a timely and invaluable implicit reminder of the role that U.S. foreign policy has played in the rise of Castro, not to mention Osama bin Laden and Saddam Hussein. Hitler had his Leni Riefenstahl, and now Castro has his Bravo.
BOOKS
June 18, 1989 | Cruz Reynoso, Reynoso served for five years as a justice of the California Supreme Court and now practices law with the law firm of Kaye, Scholar, Fierman, Hays & Handler. and
The cross currents in the abortion issue are many. A highway sign on Route 99 in California's Central Valley reads, if I remember, "The right to an abortion," but the words an abortion are stricken and the word kill is interlineated. At the same time, in 1988, for the first time in a decade, the California Legislature did not include a budgetary prohibition on the use of public funds for abortion. "Roe v. Wade," the paperback edition of a book published a year ago by Macmillan, examines where this country has been on the issue of abortion.
BOOKS
March 12, 1995 | RICHARD EDER
With such a title, you might expect Doubleday to replace the bare price on its jacket-flap with "Only $22.50 If You Order Now." In fact, Thomas Cahill's account of how Irish monks preserved classical culture in the Dark Ages is both less and more than its title. Less, in that Cahill tugs for attention with a pinch of what you might call Irish Exceptionalism or, in the vernacular, blarney. More, in that his book offers an account which, if not as absolutely untold as the subtitle suggests, is probably as unheard by most of us. Despite some odd ordering and a good deal of ramble, it makes a lovely and engrossing tale.
BOOKS
March 31, 1991 | Anne Roiphe, Roiphe is the author of the novel "Lovingkindness" (Warner Books). Her new novel, "The Pursuit of Happiness," will be published in June by Summit Press
Yes, every day someone publishes a new Holocaust book. Yes, we already know the worst and the worst beyond that. Yes, the heart and the mind can stand only so much. One day we will be ready to go on, to let history bind the wound, but not yet. Now, at the end of the 20th Century, we are still documenting, remembering, honoring, uncovering. We remain stunned and we cannot turn away, not while the last survivors speak, not while there is still history to be recovered, words to be heard.
BOOKS
August 17, 1997 | SARAH VOWELL, Sarah Vowell is the author of "Radio On" and music columnist for the Internet magazine Salon
The other day, I crashed my grocery cart smack dab into the cardboard face of Elvis. A special display of the video of the " '68 Comeback Special" was blocking an aisle next to the pancake mix, and since I'd never owned it, I tossed a tape on top of the bananas, thinking the whole Mr. Presley-Mrs. Butterworth's convergence made perfect sense. Because Elvis, like the supermarket, is all about inspiring hunger and desire and bodily want. And of all the Elvises, the nervous, leather-clad rocker inside the "Comeback" box has always been my favorite, offering his sweaty flesh and blood to his fans in a kind of lewd communion.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2013 | By Pamela Wood
On Maryland's Eastern Shore, a previously untold story of free African Americans is being told through newly discovered bits of glass, shards of pottery and oyster shells. Piece by piece, archaeologists and historians from two universities and the local community are uncovering the history of The Hill, a part of the town of Easton believed to be the earliest community of free blacks in the United States, dating to 1790. It also could have been the largest community of free blacks in the Chesapeake region.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
With countless books, films, re-issues, compilations and the like, it would be easy to assume there are no new stories to be told about the Beatles. The documentary “Good Ol' Freda,” which has its world premiere Saturday at the South by Southwest film festival, finds a previously unheard-from eyewitness to the entire history of the band. Freda Kelly was a secretary for the band and ran their official fan club for more than 10 years. Only 17 when she started working for the band, at first she made the fan club address her home address in Liverpool.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | John Horn, Los Angeles Times
The original title of director Sacha Gervasi's "Hitchcock" was "Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho," the name of Stephen Rebello's book on which the film is based. Anthony Hopkins, who plays the famed filmmaker in the movie, thought the longer name was a terrible idea, sounding more like a symposium than a film - "I said to Sacha, 'That's a doomed title," Hopkins said - and eventually Gervasi shared his actor's opinion. The plot's real focus, said Gervasi, was not so much how Hitchcock filmed his most renowned work but rather what was happening in his personal and professional life off-screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2012 | By Laura Hudson
"Marvel Comics: The Untold Story" performs an act of what superhero comics fans might term "retcon" - or retroactive continuity - by returning to the beginning of the superhero industry and telling the tale again with a number of previously invisible heroes suddenly added to the story: the men and women who created superhero comics. Superhero comics has always been a bit of an oddball, a niche genre with a small but fiercely devoted fan base and a penchant for stories about flawed, outcast heroes who struggle not only to save the world but find their place in it. Sean Howe's book traces the byzantine histories of the colorful characters on the comics pages and in the Marvel offices, from the inception of the superhero in the 1930s through the modern era, and finds the real and the fictional equally laced with epic triumphs, tragic reversals of fortune, backstabbing and melodrama.
OPINION
February 24, 2012 | By Timothy M. Phelps
Marie Colvin and I covered our first combat together in 1986, after the U.S. bombed Libya. She was 30, pretty, ambitious and talented. She soon had Col. Moammar Kadafi and his aides in her thrall and parlayed her many scoops for United Press International into a job as a foreign correspondent for the Sunday Times of London. I last saw her a year ago, in Cairo during the revolution. Three decades of bearing witness to war showed in her face: I recognized her only from her black eye patch, which she had worn since a hand grenade destroyed her left eye in Sri Lanka in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
A Thousand Lives The Untold Story of Hope, Deception, and Survival at Jonestown Julia Scheeres Free Press: 320 pp., $26 Before Julia Scheeres came along, Thom Bogue had not talked publicly about Jonestown. But when he realized that, like him, she had also been a troubled teen sent to a tropical religious camp - which she chronicled in the bestselling memoir "Jesus Land" - he decided to share his experiences. At 15, Tommy was sent from California to Guyana, where he lived for two years under the increasingly bizarre control of the Rev. Jim Jones.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | JIM MANN
This column is about America's walk on the moon and the untold story of one of the most poignant presidential speeches in American history--a speech that never had to be delivered. In two weeks, this country will celebrate the 30th anniversary of the day when Neil Armstrong and Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. stepped onto the surface of the moon. Over the past three decades, many of the details of that epic trip have been told over and over again in books and movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Untold Story A Novel Monica Ali Scribner: 259 pp., $25 Fairy tales are the Euclidian geometry of fiction. Reading them — and having them read to us — are the moments when we first divide reality. We teach our imagination to leap, hit the ground and keep on running. We willingly take that leap — children, adults and everyone between carrying that tiny grain of disbelief in the "real" world of facts and plunge instead into a world of fables. So Monica Ali's "Untold Story," a novel of "what if," will come as no surprise.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2011
A Singular Woman The Untold Story of Barack Obama's Mother Janny Scott Riverhead: 376 pp., $26.95
Los Angeles Times Articles
|