Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnwanted
IN THE NEWS

Unwanted

ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2006
RE "Seeking the Right Rx for FX," by Maria Elena Fernandez, Aug. 22: Killing off a little girl ("The Shield"). Glorifying spousal rape ("Rescue Me"). How surprising that the so-called cutting edge of television translates once again to violence against women and girls. As for Denis Leary's complaints about political correctness clouding the creative use of rape on TV: If he ever becomes the victim of unwanted penetration by a man who outweighs him by 100 pounds, I know he'll use the experience to enhance the creative risk-taking on his show.
Advertisement
HEALTH
August 21, 2000
Re "The Abortion Pill: Finally at Hand?" (Aug. 14), what a delightfully well-balanced pair of stories on the latest scheme for women to avoid the inconvenience of giving birth by easily aborting their unwanted offspring with pills. A mere two paragraphs at the end of one story were allotted to "opponents of abortion," while 73 paragraphs matter-of-factly endorsed the controversial new pills and complained that women are being denied this wonder drug to flush their unwanted embryos like so many bowel movements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1993
Pope John Paul II just doesn't get it, does he ("Pontiff Assails U.S. Church," Aug. 15)? That many teen-agers of today are engaged in sexual activity is a "given." That sex, unprotected by contraceptive devices, results in many unwanted children is yet another "given." That society as a whole must shoulder the burden in hundreds of ways for all those unwanted babies is the biggest "given" of all. We Catholics of the United States ("the "supermarket" Catholics as the Vatican hierarchy so disdainfully refer to us)
BUSINESS
May 2, 2010 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
When the last Jungle Cruise boat docks for the night and lights fade to black on Sleeping Beauty's Castle, the real work begins. At lush Pixie Hollow, gardeners don miner's headlamps as they begin uprooting stubborn weeds. On Main Street, custodians scrape chewing gum off the sidewalk. And over at Mickey's Toontown, painters sand and recoat chipped handrails. Few see it happen, except perhaps for the dozens of feral cats that emerge from their hiding places to prowl the park after hours, stalking rodents.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | MARTIN FACKLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mrs. Liu could have had three daughters by now. But the shame and legal costs would have been unbearable, so she gave her second daughter away at birth and aborted a third when an ultrasound scan showed that fetus, too, was female. In 1949, the Communist Party took power promising to end centuries of degradation for China's women. Yet hundreds of thousands of unwanted baby girls are abandoned, aborted and even killed each year. For poor, rural families, the choice is as stark as it is cruel.
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | GEORGE ESPER, Associated Press
The war was still raging that day 15 years ago when Vietnamese nuns heard the cries of a baby boy stuffed in a garbage can and took him inside their orphanage to raise. Today, Nguyen Thanh Binh, the son of a black American who went home and a Vietnamese mother who abandoned him, shares the plight of thousands of Amerasian youths languishing in the decay of Vietnam, desperately trying to get out and find their fathers. "My circumstances are miserable," says Lam Anh Hong, 18, whose mother gave her away to a relative.
HEALTH
January 26, 2009 | Chris Woolston
Every once in a while, hard science has a cosmetic payoff. We use botulinum toxins to erase wrinkles, and lasers to remove unwanted hair. Now a company called Jane Beauty is promising to apply scientific principles for another purely cosmetic purpose: longer, thicker eyelashes.
SCIENCE
November 21, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
As a drug, marijuana has certain effects and, depending on why you're taking it, some side effects. And not everyone wants the whole package. New research finds that for patients who consider weed's buzz an unwanted side effect, the answer might be as simple as taking an ibuprofen with their tetrahydrocannibinol (or THC). A study published Thursday in the journal Cell both demonstrates and explains why common anti-inflammatory drugs, including ibuprofen and the prescription analgesics indomethacin and celecoxib (marketed as Celebrex)
Los Angeles Times Articles
|