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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Meg James
ABC has wrapped up the bulk of its upfront advertising sales for the upcoming television season, holding back some commercial time to sell throughout the year. After more than two months of negotiations with the various ad agencies, the Walt Disney Co.-owned broadcast network on Thursday was putting the finishing touches on its final deals, according to a person close to the negotiations. ABC became the last of the Big Four broadcast networks to end the haggling with ad buyers -- but not because of a lack of interest in ABC's slate, which includes "Modern Family," "Scandal," "Grey's Anatomy" and "The Bachelor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before getting ready to fly back to D.C. The Skinny: Traveling to D.C. on Saturday for Passover on Monday. Given the cost of flying and renting a car, this will be a very expensive Seder. Don't worry, eating matzo won't stop me from doing the Morning Fix on Monday and Tuesday. Today's roundup includes analysis of Stephen Colbert's move to CBS and a preview of the weekend box office.  Daily Dose: Although it doesn't look like DirecTV is going to carry the Dodgers-owned, Time Warner Cable channel SportsNet LA any time soon, don't expect that to change the $3.63 sports surcharge the satellite broadcaster hits its Southland subscribers with every month.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Joe Flint
NEW YORK -- NBC Broadcasting Chairman Ted Harbert feels the pain of advertisers who have spent the last two months sitting in stuffy auditoriums listening to television executives tell them where to spend their money in advance of the fall TV season. "I think it's a little crazy," Harbert said at NBC's so-called upfront announcement to advertisers at Radio City Music Hall on Monday. By Harbert's count, there are 18 upfront presentations this week alone and there have been 70 so far this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
Oxygen Media on Tuesday unveiled its 2014 programming slate in New York, which will include seven new reality series aimed at modern young women.  The new lineup will include two competition series. In "Nail'd It," hosted by Adrienne Bailon, top nail designers will vie against each other for a $100,000 prize, while "Street Art Throwdown" will feature up-and-coming street artists aspiring to be the next Banksy. In "Fix My Choir," struggling choirs will receive mentoring from Michelle Williams, formerly of Destiny's Child, and Deitrick Haddon, star of the network's "Preachers of L.A. "  From executive producer T.I., "Sisterhood of Hip Hop" will follow a number of female hip-hop artists looking to break out to mainstream success.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Meg James
The broadcast television advertising market is in full swing, with the top-rated CBS network once again leading the pack. By Friday afternoon, CBS was close to finishing its advance advertising sales for the 2013-14 television season, notching rate increases of 6% to 7.5%, according to people familiar with the negotiations. CBS is expected to wrap the annual auction with $2.5 billion in commitments for prime-time commercials. A year ago, CBS finished the auction with higher rate increases -- ranging from 8% to 10% -- for a total haul of $2.6 billion.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2009 | Jim Puzzanghera
Federal regulators, taking aim at a common tactic used in mortgage frauds, will look at a nationwide ban on companies' charging upfront fees for helping homeowners modify loans to avoid foreclosures. The move comes as federal and state officials plan to expand a crackdown on mortgage-related scams to other schemes that prey on debt-ridden consumers desperate to stay financially afloat during the recession. "Working together, we can send a clear and straightforward message: If you perpetrate mortgage fraud . . . we will find you and we will charge you and we will put you in jail," U.S. Atty.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
At the NBC News Group's upfront presentation Thursday in New York City, “Today” host Matt Lauer wasted no time in addressing the problems plaguing the once-dominant morning program. “I would like to tackle what might be a teeny white elephant in the room. We all love covering the news, we hate being the news,” he said on stage at the New York Public Library's Celeste Bartos Forum, where he was joined by co-host Savannah Guthrie. “I promise to spend all of my time and energy over the next several months trying to keep Savannah out of the headlines.” The joke, of course, is that it's Lauer who's been getting the wrong kind of attention recently, culminating with an ill-timed front-page story in Thursday's New York Times about his plummeting popularity . PHOTOS: Celebrity portraits by The Times But if the bad press had him blue, Lauer wasn't letting on. He put on a brave face at the presentation, joking that “we want to go back to the most-watched morning program and the least-talked about morning program.” NBC Universal News chairman Pat Fili-Krushel likewise stressed “Today” in her remarks at the luncheon, pointing out the months of work put into “evolving” the ailing cash cow. “We are really pleased with the direction it's headed,” she said, boasting that with “Today,” MSNBC's “Morning Joe” and CNBC's “Squawk Box,” they “own” morning television.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1994 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The talented improvisational players at Santa Monica's Upfront Comedy Showcase can turn people into animals, household objects into formidable monsters and a few words of nonsense into stirring comic-drama--all without the aid of any script. But a year ago, when the earthquake brought the house down at the Showcase's Third Street Promenade location, the risk-taking players found themselves without a safe theater to play in.
REAL ESTATE
January 30, 2000
Financing a custom-built home can be a very complicated process. ("The Hard Part of the Dream" by Agnes Huff, Jan. 2). These tips can help smooth the process: Start working on financing as early in the process as possible. Ask your lender to give you a credit approval upfront, subject to your plans and specs. That way you know you have financing lined up prior to completion of plans. Do your best to provide everything the lender asks for upfront and keep copies of everything you submit.
REAL ESTATE
July 7, 2002
In "Upside and Downside of YSPs" (June 16), Jack Guttentag examines yield spread premiums and the risks posed in adopting proposals that limit their responsible use. Guttentag is right on the mark in cautioning regulators of the risk of "throwing out the baby with the bathwater" when YSPs can be used to benefit the consumer. The purpose of YSPs is not to deliver "high cost" loans by mortgage brokers. Used as a means to decrease closing costs, YSPs can be beneficial to borrowers with little cash to obtain no-cost mortgages or represent an alternative for those willing to pay a higher rate to reduce upfront fees.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2014 | By Andrea Chang
L.A. techies, typically found close to the beach, are going east of the 405 -- at least for a day. Hundreds of top entrepreneurs and investors are congregating at the newly opened Ace Hotel in downtown Los Angeles on Thursday for the Upfront Summit . The annual technology and investor conference, hosted by Santa Monica venture capital firm Upfront Ventures (formerly GRP Partners), quickly reached capacity thanks to a lineup of speakers that includes Jeremy Liew of Lightspeed Venture Partners, Nate Redmond of Rustic Canyon and Dana Settle of Greycroft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2014 | By Larry Gordon and Jason Song
The recent expulsions of 11 students from an Orange County high school because of a cheating scandal appeared to be a forceful stand against academic dishonesty. But that discipline also has focused attention on the murkier questions about whether, and how, colleges should be informed about applicants' histories of misbehavior. College admissions officials say the expelled students and others in similar situations should come clean quickly to schools they've applied to, and they should be prepared for the consequences, including the possibility of having acceptance letters revoked.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Meg James
ABC has wrapped up the bulk of its upfront advertising sales for the upcoming television season, holding back some commercial time to sell throughout the year. After more than two months of negotiations with the various ad agencies, the Walt Disney Co.-owned broadcast network on Thursday was putting the finishing touches on its final deals, according to a person close to the negotiations. ABC became the last of the Big Four broadcast networks to end the haggling with ad buyers -- but not because of a lack of interest in ABC's slate, which includes "Modern Family," "Scandal," "Grey's Anatomy" and "The Bachelor.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By John Horn
After toiling for years in a series of unsatisfying jobs, Robert Rossil finally hit on an idea that he believed could turn everything around: He would become a Hollywood screenwriter. "I had some downfalls. I thought I had to do something big," said Rossil, 41, of Palmdale, who has delivered flowers, worked as a care-giver and sold homes. "I always wanted to grow up to be rich. " Having played soccer as a teen, Rossil thought a script about Uruguay's stunning upset of Brazil in the 1950 World Cup could be his ticket.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
The gig: Mark Suster is an entrepreneur, angel investor and managing partner at Century City venture capital firm Upfront Ventures, formerly known as GRP Partners. A vocal proponent of L.A.'s growing tech scene, Suster has become known as the go-to guy for early-stage technology companies looking for funding. His current investments include Adly, Maker Studios, Moonfrye and Pose. Suster also founded tech accelerator program Launchpad LA and writes a blog, Both Sides of the Table, in which he shares his views on tech trends and offers advice to start-up founders.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
GRP Partners, one of the go-to venture capital firms in the L.A. area, made a slew of major announcements Thursday: It's changing its name to Upfront Ventures, has a new $200-million fund and is moving from Century City to Santa Monica. We got a sneak peek of the new space this month and it's pretty sweet. At the corner of Arizona Avenue and 7th Street, the office boasts 8,000 square feet of indoor space and a 4,000-square-foot sprawling rooftop deck with 360-degree views. PHOTOS: Top smartphones of 2013 After searching for a new location for several months, Upfront signed a 10-year lease and plans to move in February after extensive construction and remodeling to make the space more open and modern.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Auto leasing deals abound these days, with offers that often seem too good to be true. How about a well-equipped Honda Accord for $250 a month with no down payment or any other drive-off fees? Or better yet, $199 a month for a Chevrolet Malibu? So, what's the catch? There isn't any if you know what you're getting into. There are always details. You need top-tier credit to qualify. You pay a penalty if you turn that Honda in with more than 36,000 miles. And the payment is not $250 a month because of that little matter of tax. It is more like $275, depending on where you live.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before cleaning five days of mail off my desk. The Skinny: I've been listening to a lot of Jackson Browne lately. Might explain the somber mood. Anyway, back in Los Angeles after five days in D.C. I'll miss family but not the humidity. Thursday's headlines include the latest on the upfront market, Gannett acquires Belo Corp. and the Tennis Channel chief executive regrets a late-night email to staff. Daily Dose: After Gannett closes on its deal to acquire Belo Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Meg James
The Fox broadcast network, which suffered a prime-time ratings free-fall during the just completed TV season, has closed out its upfront advertising sales with its total haul falling short of last year's auction. Despite its ratings woes, Fox was able to hike its ad rates by 5% to 7% for prime-time commercials for the 2013-14 television season, according to a person familiar with the negotiations. The News Corp. network secured commitments from advertisers totaling $1.75 billion to $1.8 billion, which represents about an 8% decline from its year-ago amount.
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