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Upfront Comedy Showcase

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1994 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The talented improvisational players at Santa Monica's Upfront Comedy Showcase can turn people into animals, household objects into formidable monsters and a few words of nonsense into stirring comic-drama--all without the aid of any script. But a year ago, when the earthquake brought the house down at the Showcase's Third Street Promenade location, the risk-taking players found themselves without a safe theater to play in.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1994 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The talented improvisational players at Santa Monica's Upfront Comedy Showcase can turn people into animals, household objects into formidable monsters and a few words of nonsense into stirring comic-drama--all without the aid of any script. But a year ago, when the earthquake brought the house down at the Showcase's Third Street Promenade location, the risk-taking players found themselves without a safe theater to play in.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1994 | SCOTT COLLINS
In "Joe Show," at UpFront Comedy Showcase in Santa Monica, solo performer Joe Liss offers vignettes of six eccentrics from one Chicago neighborhood. With his putty features and gift for mimicry, Liss comes well-equipped for the mission.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1992 | BARBARA ISENBERG
For stand-up comic John Marshall Jones, even something as horrible as the city's recent riots can be a laughing matter. At the Comedy Act Theatre in South-Central Los Angeles, where he appears regularly, Jones this week took on the Rodney G. King beating with: "They keep saying that racism had nothing to do with it. Of course, race has nothing to do with it. If you're the baton."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1991 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As we close out the year, there's one thing in life that remains constant and that's "The Fantasticks," now in its 3lst year Off-Broadway and the longest-running show in American theater. Phenomenons are worth a repeated look, and the production at the Richard Basehart Playhouse in Woodland Hills is a spirited revival of this fragile parable about love.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Janice Arkatov writes about theater for The Times
The Idiots are back. "It's our triumphant return," announces Village Idiots founder Bill Ackerman. Tonight, the 1 1/2- year-old, eight-member improv group does indeed return to the West End Playhouse, where they'd originally begun a successful run last summer (decamping in March for a three-month stint at the Powerhouse in Santa Monica), and are now scheduled for an indefinite stay.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1991 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This is a different "Dr. Galley" than the one a few years ago at Theatre East. It's the same play, by Conrad Bromberg, with the same psychological twists and turns, but the two performances are as night to day, proving how strong the writing and characterization are. In this incarnation, teamed at Actors Forum with Marc Mantell's "Apartments," William Douglas Smith is levelheaded and quite controlled as practicing psychiatrist Robert Galley, lecturing to a friend's class.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1993 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Remember Deconstruction? That bare-bones/tech-happy theater that chews up cultural sound bites and spits them back at you? It was big in early '80s New York. And now it's back--in a small way--in "The Haunting" and "Larry Swell's Big Bang" at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. This Butane Group/Ken Roht double bill mixes stylized acting and hyped theatricality a la the Wooster Group, Richard Foreman and other big names of the downtown Manhattan scene, circa a decade ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the holidays, there are always "Christmas Carols" and "Nutcrackers" to suit just about any taste. 'Tis the season, too, for other live family and children's shows, with and without a holiday theme, from the Disney folks' all-out ice-skating spectacular to more modest stage versions of fairy tales and literary classics. A sampling: "Walt Disney's World on Ice" (Locations follow, (714) 740-2000, (213) 480-3232).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014
Wendy Hughes Australian actress dies at 61 Wendy Hughes, 61, an Australian actress best known to American audiences for her performance in the 1979 film "My Brilliant Career," died of cancer Saturday in Sydney, her family said. Hughes began her rise to stardom during a renaissance in the Australian film industry in the 1970s and '80s, beginning with "My Brilliant Career," in which she played Aunt Helen to the headstrong heroine portrayed by Judy Davis. The film swept the Australian Film Institute awards and in the U.S. was nominated for an Oscar and a Golden Globe.
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