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Uphill Battle

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1988
The environmental activists who oppose the road through Penasquitos Canyon ("Suit Planned to Halt Penasquitos Road," May 6) are fighting an uphill battle. I'm not optimistic about their chances for success. San Diegans drive pickups in record numbers. Off-road vehicle ownership is the highest in the nation. Voter apathy is the highest in the state. And there's a freeway through every major park in the city! Concern for matters environmental is vanishingly low. Most people here could care less about Penasquitos Canyon.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Ron Nehring, former chairman of the California Republican Party, said Tuesday that he is running for lieutenant governor. "It's a key leadership position in state government, and the lieutenant governor's office is what the holder chooses to make of it," Nehring said in an interview. Current Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, "treats it like a taxpayer-funded gubernatorial exploratory committee for 2018," Nehring said. "The office should be used as a platform to develop the type of bold reform plans that the state needs.
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OPINION
March 19, 2007
Re "80 is the new 65," Opinion, March 13 During the first half of the 20th century, most workers who retired at age 65 had a life expectancy of less than five years. Those who qualified for retirement benefits in advanced countries imposed little cost on government or business. Since 1950, average life expectancy not only rose 10 years from 68 to 78 years, but more significantly, a revolution of rising expectations transformed the concept of retirement from a brief hiatus between work and death to a prolonged consumerist experience of fulfilling travel, leisure, entertainment and recreation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan and David Zahniser
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti on Thursday set the stage for a potentially messy confrontation with the City Council, saying he would refuse to sign a proposed salary deal with the politically potent union representing Department of Water and Power workers. Local 18 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers ran a fierce campaign against Garcetti, whose main argument in the mayoral election in May was that he could be trusted to stand up for DWP ratepayers. In a written statement, Garcetti said the union-endorsed contract proposal included cost savings that were worth pursuing.
SPORTS
May 20, 1992 | DOUG CRESS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The luxury hotel where the U.S. men's basketball team is supposed to stay is still under construction. Yachting officials say they fear hepatitis and bacterial problems from the polluted Mediterranean, the soccer team must play two of its opening-round games 200 miles to the west in Zaragoza, and the lack of air-conditioning in either the athletes' village or on the team buses has everybody concerned. Then there's the marathon course. . . .
SPORTS
December 22, 2009 | Helene Elliott
The countdown to the Vancouver Olympics will take another leap forward Wednesday, when Belarus will become the first of 12 competing hockey federations to announce its roster for the men's tournament. Russia, a potential gold medalist, will announce its powerful roster on Christmas. Defending champion Sweden will declare its entries Sunday. The parade will end with announcements by Canada on Dec. 30 and the U.S. on Jan. 1 during the Winter Classic. As the host nation and self-proclaimed inventor of hockey, Canada will face the most scrutiny and pressure in Vancouver.
NEWS
March 31, 1994
Recycling is taking a beating at Capistrano Valley High School in Mission Viejo, with banana peels and Kleenex often in the red-colored recycling bins and aluminum cans in trash bins, according to article in the student newspaper, the CVHS Times. "In my opinion, students are lazy. They don't want to walk a few feet further to a recycling bin," one student said. "The way it is now, the janitors spend their valuable time playing mommy," another said about the need to pick up student messes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2001 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis acknowledged Tuesday that he faces long odds in his effort to persuade lawmakers to rescue troubled Southern California Edison, but vowed to present a new plan when the Legislature returns next month for the special session he has demanded. While Davis did not offer details about the new legislation, the Democratic governor said he expects that whatever its details, Edison will have the right to review and agree to it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1985 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, Times Staff Writer
When the sixth Frustaci septuplet was handed to him in St. Joseph Hospital's delivery room Tuesday morning, respiratory therapist Lea Endress called it "the closest thing to a miracle I've ever seen --almost a religious experience." The tiny boy known as Baby F--later nicknamed "The Peanut"--had silky-smooth skin, eyes pressed shut and delicately formed ears. But it was his size--nearly half that of his five siblings born minutes earlier, that filled the veteran medical technician with awe.
NEWS
June 6, 1985 | Associated Press
President Reagan, responding for the first time to this week's Supreme Court ruling on public school prayer, said today, "We still have an uphill battle before us" to bring prayer to the classroom. In remarks at a fund-raiser for Sen. Jeremiah Denton (R-Ala.), Reagan praised the senator's efforts to pass the "Equal Access Act," which Reagan said would "make sure that student religious groups have the same rights as other student groups."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant
Motorists whizzing by an oak-studded canyon off the 210 Freeway near Tujunga might know it as the Verdugo Hills Golf Course. But to Lloyd Hitt, 81, a retired Sunland pharmacist who fights to preserve the area's historic structures, it's his toughest battleground ever. During World War II, part of the 30-acre golf course housed more than 2,000 "enemy aliens," mostly adult male Japanese immigrants taken from their homes after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor. They were temporarily housed in what was known as the Tuna Canyon Detention Station, before being sent to internment camps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2013 | By Jean Merl, Los Angeles Times
All he asks, Los Angeles City Atty. Carmen Trutanich frequently says, is that voters judge him on his record. As he wages an uphill battle to hang onto to his job in the May 21 election, Trutanich rattles off a list of reasons he should be "rehired" to head one of the nation's largest municipal law firms. He cites a substantially reduced reliance on costly outside attorneys, favorable outcomes in lawsuits that he says have saved taxpayers more than $300 million and a crackdown on illegal billboards that activists called scourges on their neighborhoods.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2013 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - For more than a decade, conservative Orange County Rep. Dana Rohrabacher has formed an unusual alliance with liberals on an unexpected topic - the defense of marijuana. Rohrabacher (R-Huntington Beach) and his allies have so far waged a futile effort to pass legislation that would prevent federal authorities from interfering with medical marijuana use in California and other places where pot use is permitted by state law. But as more states have moved to allow the drug's use, Rohrabacher believes his Respect State Marijuana Laws Act may be gaining momentum in Congress.
NATIONAL
April 15, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli and Melanie Mason, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A single conversation on the Senate floor Monday illustrated the challenges senators face in pushing a bipartisan measure to extend background checks to most gun sales. Sen. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.), the chief author of the proposal, spent some 20 minutes lobbying Alaska's two senators, one a conservative Democrat who faces reelection in 2014 and the other a Republican who has sometimes broken with her party. Neither the Democrat, Sen. Mark Begich, nor the Republican, Sen. Lisa Murkowski, has committed to the proposal, which could be the most far-reaching gun legislation to pass the Senate in more than two decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - Russian Hill's Velvet Da Vinci gallery, which offers an array of edgy jewelry and metalwork, has been doing brisk business lately in "Save Polk St. " T-shirts. Neighboring shops have signs in their display windows warning that a "radical agenda" threatens the shopping district, where residents can get shoes fixed at Frank's, fill pantries at Real Food Co., sip a Soju cocktail at Amelie or buy a silicone sex toy at Good Vibrations. Just what is jeopardizing the vital north-south corridor - which provides a flat route, by San Francisco standards - from the Civic Center to the bay?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
Tina Hess says she never planned to be an L.A. City Council candidate. But last November, when she turned her attention to local races after the presidential election, she was shocked to see not a single woman running to represent her Westside district. And in seven other council races across the city, only a handful of women were running, compared with dozens of men. "I just saw this void," said Hess, a city prosecutor who lives in Del Rey. She decided to enter the race when she realized the city could soon be without a single woman on its 15-member lawmaking body.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1990 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Libertarian Phillip Tisbert describes his race against Republican incumbent Phillip D. Wyman in the 34th Assembly District as "truly a case of David and Goliath." "And I intend to win," he added. But Tisbert concedes that he is fighting an uphill battle against the conservative Wyman. In fact, Wyman, the Assembly minority whip who was elected to the Assembly in 1978, is so well-entrenched that he faces no Democratic opposition on the Nov. 6 ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1989 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dennis Petrie, program director of a Chatsworth home for juvenile delinquents and a political neophyte, has announced he is running as a Democrat for the 37th Assembly District seat held by Cathie Wright (R-Simi Valley). Petrie, 29, is the only Democrat so far to announce that he will campaign in the sprawling, conservative district, which covers suburban areas of Los Angeles, Ventura and Santa Barbara counties. Republicans outnumber Democrats in the district by more than 3 to 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2012 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
A small group of opponents to a three-decade transportation sales tax extension on next month's ballot huddled this week for their first news conference, a thinly attended event in a Hyde Park parking lot. Only two television stations showed up - one from USC - signaling the kind of David versus Goliath battle they face. The Coalition to Defeat Measure J included a smattering of groups with accumulated grievances against the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
NATIONAL
June 8, 2012 | By David Horsey
There was a wee dram of good news for Democrats coming out of the Wisconsin recall election Tuesday. While a solid majority of voters chose to retain their Republican governor, Scott Walker, a similar majority told exit pollsters they planned to vote for President Obama in November. It is small solace, however. Barack Obama carried Wisconsin with 56% of the vote in 2008 and has been expected to recapture the state with no great effort this year. To celebrate a likely victory that was already supposed to be in the bag seems like throwing a party because the sun rose again this morning.
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