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Upland Ca

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2001 | GENE MADDAUS and TIPTON BLISH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Superior Court jury ruled Tuesday that a 14-year-old boy from Upland was sane when he fatally shot his mother and younger sister more than two years ago. The decision means that Paul Yum, now 17, faces 80 years to life in state prison when he is sentenced in February. "His mother's family has been here throughout this trial," defense attorney Angela Oh told jurors outside court. "They want him to have a life and a future, and now he's not going to have one.
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NEWS
April 19, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The earthquakes that rattled both Northern and Southern California on consecutive days this week even startled a few scientists, although they insisted there is no reason to believe that the widely separated earthquakes were related events. "We're uneasy when we see earthquakes popping off all over the place," said William Ellsworth, a seismologist and geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park.
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A magnitude 4.6 earthquake that struck just west of Upland at 3:32 p.m. Tuesday was the most recent of hundreds of aftershocks that have startled Southern Californians after the Feb. 28 Upland earthquake. The afternoon jolt was preceded by two foreshocks Tuesday, a magnitude 3.3 temblor at 7:12 a.m. and a magnitude 2.6 at 7:19 a.m. Those, in turn, had been preceded by a magnitude 3.4 shock about three miles farther northwest at 1:47 a.m. Tuesday. Geologist Lucile Jones of the U.S.
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A magnitude 4.6 earthquake that struck just west of Upland at 3:32 p.m. Tuesday was the most recent of literally hundreds of aftershocks that have startled Southern Californians after the Feb. 28 Upland earthquake. The afternoon jolt was preceded by two foreshocks Tuesday, a magnitude 3.3 temblor at 7:12 a.m. and a magnitude 2.6 at 7:19 a.m. Those, in turn, had been preceded by a magnitude 3.4 shock about three miles farther northwest at 1:47 a.m. Tuesday. Geologist Lucile Jones of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1990
The U.S. Small Business Administration has declared victims of the Feb. 28 Upland earthquake, which caused an estimated $10.4 million in damages, eligible for low-interest loans for uninsured losses. From March 26 through April 7, the agency will maintain offices at City Hall in Pomona and the Ontario police and fire complex on C Street. Hours will be from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Saturday.
NEWS
March 19, 1990
A small earthquake rattled the Upland area early Sunday morning, but there were no reports of damage or injury. The 3.3-magnitude temblor struck at 5:56 a.m., and was centered about 3 miles northwest of Upland, said Bob Finn, spokesman for Caltech in Pasadena. Finn said Sunday's quake is the latest in a series of more than 500 aftershocks to a 5.5-magnitude temblor on Feb. 28.
NEWS
March 8, 1990
An apparent aftershock of the Upland earthquake on Feb. 28 shook the Upland-Pomona area at 10:25 p.m. Wednesday but apparently caused no damage or injury. Caltech seismologists said it was centered in the same area as the earlier temblor, 4 miles northeast of Upland. Upland police dispatcher Sharon Goodwin said, "I sure did feel it but we only got a few calls on it." Pomona police said they hadn't felt it nor had they received any calls.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | SCOTT HARRIS and STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
This time around, there was little call for a wrecking ball, and barely a bulldozer was needed. No bridges had collapsed, no city blocks were ablaze, no World Series was postponed. The Jaws of Life were held in reserve, awaiting the next freeway smashup. Call it the handyman's earthquake, more a fix-it job than a catastrophe. The Moderate One was made to order for a putty knife in the hands of a glazier, and a good excuse for do-it-yourselfers to stay home from work.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN and KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Communities at the foot of the San Gabriel Mountains counted 30 injuries and nearly $14 million in earthquake damage to structures, but residents who spent Thursday sweeping up broken glass and replacing toppled books acknowledged that it could have been worse. "I think we all know we were fortunate this time around," said Upland City Councilman Al Canestro. The 5.5-magnitude quake struck Wednesday afternoon three miles northwest of Upland.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Why does one earthquake feel so much different from another? The earthquake that rattled through Southern California on Wednesday may have felt quite different to people who experienced the Montebello quake last June 12, even if they were in the same place both times. Workers in office buildings in downtown Los Angeles, for example, reported feeling a sharp jolt from the 4.5 magnitude Montebello quake, whereas Wednesday's 5.5 temblor produced a long rolling motion.
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