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NEWS
May 10, 1999 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Summit, senate, impromptu steam-letting, call it what you will, but a very loose emergency session assembles--fast--just outside Eso Won Books, overlooking La Brea Avenue at the dividing line between the flats and the point where the road drifts upward toward Baldwin Hills--L.A.'s nouveau turn on a black Sugar Hill. No better an introspective intersection; a perfect point of metaphoric departure.
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OPINION
December 6, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
As an Anglophile, I'm as pathetic as the next chap. My idea of a good time is to be in London, drinking at lunch with some well-lubricated British journalist friends, stumbling out when it's getting dark, tea at a fancy hotel and then theater in the evening. Then repeat. And yes, when I'm not in London (that is, almost all the time), I rarely miss an episode of "Downton Abbey. " But at least I have the decency to be ashamed about it. The shameless popularity of this blue-blood soap opera, which starts its third season in the U.S. next month, is astonishing.
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BUSINESS
May 27, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Zenia Fernandez picked a box of brown sugar off the shelf, adjusting her glasses to scrutinize the English-language label. "What kind of sugar is this?" Well might she ask. Until last year, Mexican supermarkets had only one type of sugar, an off-white, large-grained domestic variety. Then came stores such as Super Americano, where Fernandez was shopping recently.
OPINION
September 29, 2012
Re "Exhibit A-word," Opinion, Sept. 23 Having co-written a book on the "A-word," our research revealed that the world needs these people. It was our contention that being labeled one might be a good thing: a term describing a person who is willing to break a few eggs to get big things done. One of the examples we gave was the first military leader to be tagged with the A-word label, Army Gen. George S. Patton. You wouldn't want this guy in your house, but when we needed someone to march an army 100 miles to save all those soldiers trapped during the Battle of the Bulge (including my father)
BOOKS
July 3, 1988 | Adam Hochschild, Hochschild is the author of "Half the Way Home: A Memoir of Father and Son" (Viking/Penguin).
Insiders who've written about America's ruling class are usually of two types. One includes rebels like Frederick Vanderbilt Field, who described his journey from a Fifth Avenue mansion to the Communist Party in his "From Right to Left," or Bill Ayers, son of the chief executive of Commonwealth Edison, who penned various manifestoes against corporate America before joining the Weather Underground. The other includes writers like J. P.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2012 | By Frederick Lynch, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Coming Apart The State of White America, 1960-2010 Charles Murray Crown Forum: 407 pp., $27 Charles Murray's new book is hardly the bombshell that placed him on the Politically Incorrect Ten Most Wanted list 18 years ago when he co-wrote "The Bell Curve" with Richard J. Herrnstein in 1994. But by providing a data-driven argument for inequality's cultural and sociological roots, "Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010" arrives just in time for the central political and policy debate in the 2012 elections: What is the nature of the widening gap between the rich and everyone else - and what can, or should, be done about it?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1999
Compassionate conservative: one who has unlimited compassion for the upper class. RICHARD J. RICARD Ventura
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1988
I'd like to offer my heartfelt congratulations to everyone who wrote your paper to complain about the new tax law. While they may have thought of themselves as humble middle-income Americans, their higher tax bills reveal their true status--the upper class, with incomes (probably) in the top 10% of U.S. taxpayers. MARTIN MARKOVICH Sacramento
BUSINESS
August 22, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton
The vast majority of middle-class Americans say their financial well-being has been crimped over the last 10 years by sagging home values and dreary job prospects, according to a new survey. About 85% of middle-class people say it's tougher now than a decade ago to maintain their living standards, according to the Pew Research Center report. “Since 2000, the middle class has shrunk in size, fallen backward in income and wealth, and shed some - but by no means all - of its characteristic faith in the future,” the report states.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1988 | LEONARD KLADY, Following are reviews for the American Film Institute Film Festival. All screenings are at the Cineplex Odeon Century Plaza Cinemas unless otherwise indicated. and
'A Successful Man' Cuba, 1986, 110 minutes, 8 p.m . Humberto Solas exacts a sweeping political epic in his latest film. Spanning the three decades preceding Castro, it focuses on two brothers from the upper class who become separated by conflicting ideologies. Both enjoy the privilege of their station regardless of who seizes power in this rich, melodramatic morality play. It's wonderfully ironic and politically savvy. RECOMMENDED.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The number of Americans who consider themselves to be in the lower class is growing, rising to a third of Americans from a quarter four years ago. The Pew Research Center surveyed 2,508 adults and concluded that those who place themselves on the lower income rungs tend to be more pessimistic and stressed and less secure and satisfied than their better-off peers. The group of people ages 18 to 29 who consider themselves in the lower class ballooned in 2012 to nearly 40% from 25% in 2008.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton
The rich really are different than everybody else - more intelligent and industrious but also greedier and not as honest, according to a new poll. In a reflection of the country's conflicting opinions of the wealthy, large majorities of Americans view the upper class as smart and hardworking, according to the survey by the Pew Research Center. But more than half of respondents say the well-off should pay more taxes, and two-thirds worry that the income gap between the rich and poor is widening.
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Morgan Little
The middle-class Americans who were hit worst by the recession are nonetheless the most hopeful about the country's long-term economic future, according to a major new study of middle-class attitudes by the Pew Research Center. Almost eight in 10 middle-class blacks and 67% of middle-class Latinos are optimistic about the future economic landscape, compared to Just 48% of middle-class whites. That optimism stands in sharp contrast to economic statistics that show black and Latino families lost considerably more income during the recession than did whites.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton
The vast majority of middle-class Americans say their financial well-being has been crimped over the last 10 years by sagging home values and dreary job prospects, according to a new survey. About 85% of middle-class people say it's tougher now than a decade ago to maintain their living standards, according to the Pew Research Center report. “Since 2000, the middle class has shrunk in size, fallen backward in income and wealth, and shed some - but by no means all - of its characteristic faith in the future,” the report states.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2012 | By Frederick Lynch, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Coming Apart The State of White America, 1960-2010 Charles Murray Crown Forum: 407 pp., $27 Charles Murray's new book is hardly the bombshell that placed him on the Politically Incorrect Ten Most Wanted list 18 years ago when he co-wrote "The Bell Curve" with Richard J. Herrnstein in 1994. But by providing a data-driven argument for inequality's cultural and sociological roots, "Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010" arrives just in time for the central political and policy debate in the 2012 elections: What is the nature of the widening gap between the rich and everyone else - and what can, or should, be done about it?
BUSINESS
December 4, 2011 | By Andrew Leckey
Question: Is this a good time to buy a bank stock such as Banco Santander (Brasil)? The price has come down a lot, and I know Brazil has potential. Answer: This Brazilian bank is expected to enjoy robust long-term growth in assets and loans as it focuses on that country's middle and upper classes, which are gaining in numbers. Brazil's relatively low penetration rate of banking products and services enhances its growth potential. But recently, the bank has had to cope with the battered Brazilian stock market, non-performing loan concerns and higher expenses.
NEWS
June 22, 2003 | Thomas Wagner, Associated Press Writer
The informal potluck lunch had just begun at a gentrified farmhouse outside Oxford when that age-old British preoccupation with class surfaced. The parents were drinking cocktails, and many of our children from a local, private elementary school were playing rugby on a beautiful field of grass. Most of the adults had met each other at the school during Sunday services or at sporting events. That's why my wife was surprised to realize that an acquaintance was sneering at her clothes.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton
The rich really are different than everybody else - more intelligent and industrious but also greedier and not as honest, according to a new poll. In a reflection of the country's conflicting opinions of the wealthy, large majorities of Americans view the upper class as smart and hardworking, according to the survey by the Pew Research Center. But more than half of respondents say the well-off should pay more taxes, and two-thirds worry that the income gap between the rich and poor is widening.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Clashes of class within the African American community are not often depicted on the screen, but "Jumping the Broom" tackles them head-on with humor, compassion and plenty of wisdom. Director Salim Akil, in a confident feature directorial debut, and a sparkling ensemble cast, working from Elizabeth Hunter and Arlene Gibbs' insightful script, create an exuberant comedy of universal appeal that easily flows between satire and seriousness. This endearing picture is proof that it is still possible for a major studio release to be fun, smart and heart-tugging and devoid of numbskull violence and equally numbing special effects.
HOME & GARDEN
April 4, 2009 | CHRIS ERSKINE
In our last installment, we were renting tuxedos and learning to waltz, fun stuff only if you're one of those country club stiffs who's dead from the neck up. Me, I'd rather be stapled to a ping-pong table and attacked by geese than attend a black-tie dinner. I'd rather drown in pudding. So it is a measure of how little control I have over my own life that I am at a debutante ball in middle March, escorting a pretty young redhead with kitty cat eyes and a dress like a parachute. "Daddy, you OK?"
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