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FOOD
November 10, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
Though old-school places like the Apple Pan and Pie & Burger have never wavered in their affection for pie, the old-fashioned American dessert has been missing in action at most restaurants and pastry shops for years, except at Thanksgiving. You'd see French-style tarts and, very occasionally, coy individual pies in eccentric flavors. But a slice of honest pie? Very rare, indeed. Fortunately, pie is making a comeback. It could have something to do with KCRW-FM's "Good Food" host Evan Kleiman's affection for pie, her annual pie baking contest and her app "Easy as Pie" for iPhone and iPad.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2013 | By Joy Press, Los Angeles Times
BERKSHIRE, England - It's a midsummer afternoon in the English countryside, and a parade of aristocrats is gliding up a grassy hill toward Downton Abbey. There is Lord Grantham, in his crisp dinner suit, followed by his daughters Lady Edith and Lady Mary. And here comes Lady Cora a few paces behind, talking on her... iPhone. The fantasy is further shattered on closer inspection: Mary's and Edith's beaded gowns peek out from beneath white puffy coats that are distinctly 21st century.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1986 | LINDA BURUM
It's been a close call. An American institution almost died. Just as we were about to be inundated by a flood of tartes and tortes and tiramisu, our appetites took a sudden patriotic turn. And so instead of waving goodby to American pie, we are welcoming a new generation of two-crusted American pastries. Some are sweet, some are savory. Some are old-fashioned, others new-fangled. But if it's a great piece of pie you're after, this is where to find it.
SPORTS
November 19, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
The only hint of nearby legendary greatness is a handwritten sign on an orange parking cone on the fourth step of a concrete staircase in the back of a strip mall in Hollywood. The sign says that the Wild Card Gym will be closed at 1 p.m. It doesn't get more specific, but anybody who knows anything about boxing knows the reason. Manny Pacquiao will be training on this day. This is as organized as it gets at the Wild Card Gym. Before 1 p.m., as well as every day when Pacquiao is not in town to train for another fight, the Wild Card is wonderful chaos.
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | Associated Press
The ultimate upper-crust loaf has gone on sale in England, an organic bread named after Prince Charles' Highgrove estate and containing wheat organically grown at his home farm. Tesco supermarket chain began selling Wholemeal Highgrove for $1.07 a loaf today as part of a 12-week trial at 23 Tesco stores in southeast England. The bread is made from wheat grown without pesticides at Charles' Home Farm at Highgrove, 100 miles west of London. Charles agreed to the product to promote organic farming.
FOOD
April 20, 1989 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
This, the final sequence of our pie crust series, addresses adding a top crust. Begin by preparing pastry for a double-crust pie and dividing the dough into two portions, one slightly larger than the other. Roll out the larger portion as directed in previous Back to Basics columns and fit into the pie plate. Trim the dough, leaving a one-half-inch overhang. Roll the smaller portion of dough into a circle about an inch larger in diameter than the inverted pie plate. Vents need to be cut in this top crust to allow steam to escape during baking, help keep the crusts crisp and keep the upper crust from rising too high over the filling.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2005 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Rigid class structures and the fantasies they inspire make for potent melodrama and equally exciting movement theater. From August Strindberg's "Miss Julie" to Jean Genet's "The Maids," intense parables of forbidden love and social revolt have not only become stage classics but also staples of the international ballet repertory.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
When he was an adolescent, H. Stuart Hughes tells us, he spent time depressively trying to figure out his social status. He lived in the upper middle-class neighborhood of Riverdale, on the northern end of the Bronx; but certainly, his family was not middle class. The Hugheses were prosperous, yet nowhere in the range of the great American families and fortunes.
NEWS
April 20, 1994 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Louis Auchincloss is an ornament of American letters, an authentic patrician who has distinguished himself both as an attorney and as an author of novels, biographies and short stories for more than half a century. "Tales of Yesteryear," the author's 48th book, is vintage stuff, a collection of short stories about the hard bumps in the lives of the old-fashioned American aristocracy.
TRAVEL
January 7, 2012
Greg Norman's Australian Grille describes itself as the upper crust of Down Under dining. The filet mignon is mouth-watering, and for dessert, try the signature warm chocolate soufflé. The restaurant, on the Intracoastal Waterway in North Myrtle Beach, S.C., commands nice views. Greg Norman's Australian Grille, 4930 Highway 17 S., North Myrtle Beach; (843) 361-0000, http://www.gregnormansaustraliangrille.com David Tulanian Los Angeles
FOOD
November 10, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
Though old-school places like the Apple Pan and Pie & Burger have never wavered in their affection for pie, the old-fashioned American dessert has been missing in action at most restaurants and pastry shops for years, except at Thanksgiving. You'd see French-style tarts and, very occasionally, coy individual pies in eccentric flavors. But a slice of honest pie? Very rare, indeed. Fortunately, pie is making a comeback. It could have something to do with KCRW-FM's "Good Food" host Evan Kleiman's affection for pie, her annual pie baking contest and her app "Easy as Pie" for iPhone and iPad.
TRAVEL
January 7, 2012
Greg Norman's Australian Grille describes itself as the upper crust of Down Under dining. The filet mignon is mouth-watering, and for dessert, try the signature warm chocolate soufflé. The restaurant, on the Intracoastal Waterway in North Myrtle Beach, S.C., commands nice views. Greg Norman's Australian Grille, 4930 Highway 17 S., North Myrtle Beach; (843) 361-0000, http://www.gregnormansaustraliangrille.com David Tulanian Los Angeles
BUSINESS
July 27, 2010 | By Jason Garcia
The economy could be teetering on the edge of a double-dip recession, and theme parks are still tossing discounts at reluctant travelers. But there are encouraging signs from at least one small segment of consumers: the super-rich. New data compiled by American Express Business Insights, a unit of credit card giant American Express Co., suggests that what the company calls "ultra-affluent" consumers are beginning to open their wallets wider when inside theme parks — much more so than everyone else.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2009 | Kate Stanhope
As senior vice president of production and programming for Bravo, Andy Cohen oversees cutthroat chefs and fashion designers, a la "Top Chef" and "The Fashion Show," as well as larger-than-life personalities such as Kathy Griffin and Rachel Zoe. But Cohen has a soft spot for a handful of housewives. "I've seen every frame of every episode multiple times -- I love all these women," Cohen said about the ladies of Bravo's "Real Housewives" franchise.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2007 | Paula L. Woods, Special to The Times
ON a recent European vacation, I overheard some locals asking our traveling companions what my husband and I did for a living. They professed surprise at the responses, given all that they knew of African Americans were the gangbangers and athletes they saw via the U.S. media. Guess they hadn't heard about the Huxtables, we joked at the time, not without a bit of rancor on my part born of suffering under the common assumption there is only one, monolithic "black community."
FOOD
June 8, 2005 | Regina Schrambling, Special to The Times
One morning I headed south from the Union Square farmers market thinking life could not be much better. The sky was that unbelievable blue. I had just bought fresh asparagus and even fresher fluke. And I was on my way to one of the best bakeries anywhere, an Amy's Bread that had recently opened in the West Village, on a block that has now become almost Parisian in its assemblage of high-end fish dealer, world-class cheese shop and old-style pork butcher.
MAGAZINE
January 3, 1993
The music will be beautiful in the new Disney Hall, but the building is a monument that the rich are building to themselves. Do we need this splendid concert hall built in a city full of the homeless? Do we need it while accessible public restroom facilities are nonexistent? Los Angeles doesn't know how to deal with the causes of rebellions, yet it is able to build a palace for the upper crust. How about a second thought? Let's stop building Disney Hall until Skid Row has toilets.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2005 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Rigid class structures and the fantasies they inspire make for potent melodrama and equally exciting movement theater. From August Strindberg's "Miss Julie" to Jean Genet's "The Maids," intense parables of forbidden love and social revolt have not only become stage classics but also staples of the international ballet repertory.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2004 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
Antonin CAREME, who served as chef to such luminaries as Napoleon, Talleyrand, Czar Alexander I, the British prince regent and the Rothschilds, was born in the slums of Paris, circa 1783, probably the 16th of 24 children.
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