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Upper Egypt

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NEWS
June 29, 1997 | ANTHONY SHADID, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Packing 17 times as much sand and stone as the greatest pyramid at Giza, the Aswan High Dam is as imposing as any monument Egypt is known for. Behind it sprawls Lake Nasser, the largest reservoir known to man. Below it, a ribbon of water winds through the gray and brown cliffs of the Nile Valley. Central to the dam's history is what it represents: Man's ability to harness a great river to modernize a nation living in the shadow of its past.
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WORLD
June 30, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Ingy Hassieb
CAIRO - Hundreds of thousands of protesters swelled through villages and cities Sunday, denouncing Egypt's Islamist president and raising fears of a new revolution that could divide the nation, threaten its young democracy and sink its troubled economy. Protesters against President Mohamed Morsi filled streets and squares, yelling "Leave, leave!" on the first anniversary of his inauguration. The chants echoed against distant cheers of support from Islamists who held rival rallies in what has become a dangerously polarized nation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1987 | From Reuters
Five Muslim fundamentalists smashed windows in a Christian bookshop on Wednesday and were about to pour gasoline on books and set them afire when bystanders stopped them, police said. The fundamentalists escaped. Last Friday, another Christian bookshop in Asyut was damaged and its guard beaten up. Police arrested three medical students and were seeking five more in that attack. Egypt's fundamentalists want their predominantly Muslim country ruled by Islamic law.
WORLD
August 3, 2008 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
The water is flat and the wooden boat slips past a shuttered villa toward the reeds. The fisherman crawls to the bow to check his nets; the boat drifts, but not to worry, he knows the Nile, its bends and banks, and the muddy shoals where the ferries dock and the day's catch is hauled to market. The nets are empty -- no surprise. The fish will come when the moon does, when the water is cool and dark and the din of the crowded city quiets.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2008 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
The folklore of Upper Egypt embraces and sometimes fuses a number of traditions: ancient Pharaonic, those belonging to village cultures of the area, others dating from the Ottoman conquest and more recent pan-Muslim influences. To these, Tunisian dancer Leila Haddad added source material (including costuming) from Rajasthan, India, for her varied 90-minute program titled "In the Trail of the Ghawazee" at UCLA's Royce Hall on Saturday.
NEWS
October 12, 1990 | From United Press International
Motorcycle-riding assassins wielding machine guns shot and killed Egypt's Speaker of Parliament, three bodyguards and a driver in an attack today near the heavily guarded U.S. and British Embassies in Cairo, officials and witnesses said. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack by four men on two motorcycles against a two-car motorcade escorting Speaker Rifaat El Mahgoub, 64, on the Muslim day of prayers.
NEWS
June 27, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The assassination attempt against President Hosni Mubarak marks a major escalation in the three-year Egyptian insurgency, which has defied ruthless, often bloody attempts to quash it, Middle East experts and counterterrorism officials here said Monday. Although no group has claimed responsibility for the attack in Ethiopia--the most daring and sophisticated of several recent plots against Mubarak--Islamic extremists are widely believed to be responsible.
NEWS
December 24, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Matariyah, a poor district of greater Cairo that teems with people and animals, traffic and factories, a tiny pocket of ancient serenity can be found hidden behind yellowing walls. For 28 cents, visitors are admitted to a cloistered garden to gaze at the bent and gnarled remains of an ancient sycamore tree buttressed by huge wooden beams to keep it from collapsing.
TRAVEL
September 28, 1986 | BEVERLY BEYER and ED RABEY, Beyer and Rabey are Los Angeles travel writers.
Nothing in all of nature quite prepares you for the grandeur, majesty and overpowering sense of the ancient world one finds here on the banks of the Nile. Not the roar of Niagara, the sweep of the Sahara, Himalayan peaks or the color and contours of the Grand Canyon--they weren't made by man.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It started a few years ago in this verdant village of date palms, barley fields and slow-footed water buffalo. Maybe it started the day Gamal Farghali Haridi came home from the university with a beard and a new way of talking. He spoke of God and how a good Muslim life ought to be lived. His friends grew beards too, and things started changing in the village.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2008 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
The folklore of Upper Egypt embraces and sometimes fuses a number of traditions: ancient Pharaonic, those belonging to village cultures of the area, others dating from the Ottoman conquest and more recent pan-Muslim influences. To these, Tunisian dancer Leila Haddad added source material (including costuming) from Rajasthan, India, for her varied 90-minute program titled "In the Trail of the Ghawazee" at UCLA's Royce Hall on Saturday.
NEWS
February 21, 2002 | MICHAEL SLACKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ali Thabet climbed out the window of a speeding train and held on for his life Wednesday as flames rushed through his carriage, leaped into the next carriage, and the next and the next and the next, leaving hundreds of passengers charred beyond recognition in a horrific railway disaster. Thabet jumped and survived. His father, Ali Moustafa, did too. "I just tried to save my life," Thabet, 20, said as he sat at his father's hospital bed while rescue workers pulled bodies from the wreckage.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | TANALEE SMITH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The tattered scarecrow guards more than just a field of onions on a farm in Egypt's verdant Nile Delta. Remnants of a 3,000-year-old statue lie among the crops. "It is forbidden to move the stones," farmer Abdel Ghani Abdel Salam says while hoeing a row of onions planted around parts of the statue. A gray stone arm stretches about six feet and is bent at the elbow. A pair of giant feet rest nearby.
NEWS
April 8, 1999 | SUSIE LINFIELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"A Portrait of Egypt" is not really a portrait of Egypt, which, some would argue, is the Arab world's most complex, cosmopolitan nation. Nor does the author really guide us through the world of militant Islam, for Mary Anne Weaver's subjects are too narrowly chosen (she speaks, for instance, to few people in Upper Egypt, the nation's poorest and most fundamentalist region).
NEWS
December 24, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Matariyah, a poor district of greater Cairo that teems with people and animals, traffic and factories, a tiny pocket of ancient serenity can be found hidden behind yellowing walls. For 28 cents, visitors are admitted to a cloistered garden to gaze at the bent and gnarled remains of an ancient sycamore tree buttressed by huge wooden beams to keep it from collapsing.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the Pyramids at Giza to the cataracts at Aswan, a pall has fallen across Egypt's tourism sites after the massacre of 58 visitors to Luxor as this nation struggles with grief and shame at the deed perpetrated against foreign guests on its soil. "May God destroy the homes of these terrorists," said Hesham Risk, 27, a copper and leather merchant in Cairo's main bazaar, the Khan el Khalili, standing outside his empty shop. "Because of them, people will go hungry." Since the attack Nov.
NEWS
December 28, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The revolution of Islam wears two faces in Egypt now. Schoolgirls walk the Nile River canal banks, their eyes shadowed under head scarves, or what they call "the veil." Alongside, young men cruise the Corniche highway in shark-shaped armored assault vehicles of the Egyptian state security apparatus, their eyes looking down oiled barrels of machine guns. The one face of revolution is as quiet as the scarf, patient, tolerated by officials and even encouraged.
NEWS
February 1, 1987 | HAMZA HENDAWI, Reuters
A 3,000-year-old colossus of the Pharaoh Ramses II, known as Ramses the Great, is on its way from ancient Memphis to Memphis, Tenn. Antiquities experts in Meet Rahina, south of Cairo, are putting the final touches on restoration of the huge statue, which stands on the site of ancient Memphis, once the capital of Egypt. The 60-ton, 21-foot granite statue was discovered here in 1961, broken into more than 40 pieces. It lay partly submerged in water until last November, when restoration began.
NEWS
June 29, 1997 | ANTHONY SHADID, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Packing 17 times as much sand and stone as the greatest pyramid at Giza, the Aswan High Dam is as imposing as any monument Egypt is known for. Behind it sprawls Lake Nasser, the largest reservoir known to man. Below it, a ribbon of water winds through the gray and brown cliffs of the Nile Valley. Central to the dam's history is what it represents: Man's ability to harness a great river to modernize a nation living in the shadow of its past.
NEWS
December 28, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The revolution of Islam wears two faces in Egypt now. Schoolgirls walk the Nile River canal banks, their eyes shadowed under head scarves, or what they call "the veil." Alongside, young men cruise the Corniche highway in shark-shaped armored assault vehicles of the Egyptian state security apparatus, their eyes looking down oiled barrels of machine guns. The one face of revolution is as quiet as the scarf, patient, tolerated by officials and even encouraged.
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