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WORLD
November 29, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
RISHON LE ZION, Israel - During the recent conflict between Israel and Hamas, high-tech executive Sharon Savariego was never far from the essentials: easy access to the family bomb shelter, a television beaming 24/7 emergency coverage and a laptop to check the latest Internet levity. "The jokes were everywhere," Savariego said days after the wail of sirens had receded and the rockets had stopped crashing. When "we have these situations, we make humor about everything. " Israelis are well-known for their cynicism and dark humor, a way to relieve stress, bring people together and provide an illusion of normality during a crisis.
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NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn
President Obama's longtime campaign advisor David Axelrod put his money where his mouth is -- or slightly above it to be more accurate -- having his trademark mustache shaved off on live TV this morning, making good on a pledge to raise $1 million for epilepsy research. Axelrod, who'd already offered up his lip spinach as a wager once before -- vowing to shave it off if Obama didn't carry the electoral votes in Pennsylvania, Minnesota or Michigan -- had promised to shave it off in exchange for $1 million in donations to CURE (Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy)
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For a nation bewitched by period dramas in which men wear hats and sip whiskey while making eyes at crimson-lipped women who smoke an endless succession of unfiltered cigarettes, the Sundance Channel miniseries "Restless" offers all that and more. Adapted by William Boyd from his novel of the same name, the miniseries, which premieres Friday, centers on a secret British intelligence agency attempting to draw the reluctant United States into World War II. Which means in addition to the fabulous clothes, there's a fabulous British cast, not to mention the endlessly fascinating world of espionage and a bit of revelatory World War II history.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For a nation bewitched by period dramas in which men wear hats and sip whiskey while making eyes at crimson-lipped women who smoke an endless succession of unfiltered cigarettes, the Sundance Channel miniseries "Restless" offers all that and more. Adapted by William Boyd from his novel of the same name, the miniseries, which premieres Friday, centers on a secret British intelligence agency attempting to draw the reluctant United States into World War II. Which means in addition to the fabulous clothes, there's a fabulous British cast, not to mention the endlessly fascinating world of espionage and a bit of revelatory World War II history.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Barbara Bush had a small cancerous cell removed from her upper lip today, her press office announced today. "No side effects or subsequent difficulties are expected," it said in announcing the operation. She underwent the outpatient procedure at Bethesda Naval Hospital in Maryland on Wednesday. Mrs. Bush was in New York today, visiting All Children's House, a day-care center for homeless children and other youths.
SPORTS
November 27, 1989 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the close shave Sunday night, there was a closer shave in the hotel room of Mike Lansford. With a few flicks of a razor blade, the mustache that had drooped behind Lansford's Ram face mask since 1982 was gone. Just like the New Orleans Saints a few hours later. "I did a commercial, a public service announcement," Lansford said, "and I got to looking at my face in the mirror. 'Y'know, that mustache is getting ratty. It's time to clean it up.'
SPORTS
August 5, 1992 | RICH TOSCHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it one of those oddities of life, but when your upper lip is hanging off and blood is spurting from the wound like water from a snapped-off fire hydrant and the pain is shooting across your face with such intensity that even your ears hurt, you instinctively try to protect this hanging-by-a-thread lip from further injury. You certainly don't want a professional boxer standing in front of you aiming heavy, crisp, snapping punches at the wound. You just don't.
NEWS
July 9, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Tim Henman's rain-delayed, nail-biting quest for a shot at the Wimbledon title ended in defeat Sunday, British tennis fans let out a collective sigh of resignation mixed with relief. Three days of hoping against hope had come to naught. At least the wait was over. "The capacity to live with disappointment is an essential requirement of followers of British sport," the Independent on Sunday newspaper said. And that was before Henman lost the Wimbledon semifinals to Croatian Goran Ivanisevic.
SPORTS
June 10, 2010 | By Baxter Holmes
Reporting from Boston Tony Allen stood at his locker with a swollen upper lip that had eight fresh stitches. He's not sure how the cut got there. An errant elbow, the Celtics guard thinks, at some point during his team's 91-84 loss to the Lakers on Tuesday night in Game 3 of the NBA Finals, but he can't be certain. What he knows, though, is what happened during the fourth quarter, when Kobe Bryant's sneaker caught him in the throat, causing him to writhe in pain on the floor.
SPORTS
September 14, 1985
The other day, Frank Broyles, the college football TV commentator, prescribed pinching the upper lip to overcome leg cramps. This week, I had a severe leg cramp and pinched my upper lip, just like Broyles advised. Does anyone have a cure for a black and blue upper lip--and a leg cramp? CHARLES D. SNOWDEN Granada Hills
WORLD
November 29, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
RISHON LE ZION, Israel - During the recent conflict between Israel and Hamas, high-tech executive Sharon Savariego was never far from the essentials: easy access to the family bomb shelter, a television beaming 24/7 emergency coverage and a laptop to check the latest Internet levity. "The jokes were everywhere," Savariego said days after the wail of sirens had receded and the rockets had stopped crashing. When "we have these situations, we make humor about everything. " Israelis are well-known for their cynicism and dark humor, a way to relieve stress, bring people together and provide an illusion of normality during a crisis.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
The dignified aristocrats and servants of "Downton Abbey"have found themselves socializing with meth dealers, smooth-talking ad men, terrorists and booze smugglers as one of the nominees for drama series. PBS' period drama received 16 nominations for the 64th Primetime Emmy Awards, which were announced Thursday. The English series, about an upper-class family and its cadre of domestic aides, won the award for movie or miniseries last year but was reclassified as a full-fledged drama for this year's ceremony.
IMAGE
December 18, 2011 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
Clothes and carefully cultivated facial hair are helping to make the man — and the movie — in a big way at the multiplex this season. Consider the tuxedo-wearing, thinly mustachioed men of 1920s' Hollywood in "The Artist"; the dapper denizens of 1931 Paris in "Hugo"; the suit-clad spies of 1974 London in "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy"; and the wide-ranging wardrobe of "J. Edgar's" G-men, whose shirt collars and facial hair shape-shift across half...
SPORTS
June 10, 2010 | By Baxter Holmes
Reporting from Boston Tony Allen stood at his locker with a swollen upper lip that had eight fresh stitches. He's not sure how the cut got there. An errant elbow, the Celtics guard thinks, at some point during his team's 91-84 loss to the Lakers on Tuesday night in Game 3 of the NBA Finals, but he can't be certain. What he knows, though, is what happened during the fourth quarter, when Kobe Bryant's sneaker caught him in the throat, causing him to writhe in pain on the floor.
OPINION
July 29, 2009
Re "Meaning of life," Opinion, July 26 I like the idea of "100 Things." Martin Welsh's article got me started on my own list of "100 Things." Happily, at age 79, I realize I am nowhere near any number to make me think of death. Barbara A. Hall Pasadena :: With the greatest respect and appreciation for Welsh's situation and beautiful words, several years ago I decided -- on hearing that paramedics had tried for 30 minutes to resuscitate my 82-year-old mother after she dropped to the floor while making dinner -- that at the appropriate time I would have "DNR" tattooed on my upper lip. I hope Welsh is able to prolong his pleasures in life as long as possible, and that he has the gift of a peaceful transition.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2009 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
While most American reality game shows are based on European models, back in 2005 the BBC reversed the westward flow with a London take on NBC's "The Apprentice." Now that version, currently in its fifth season and featuring self-made billionaire Sir Alan Sugar in the role of Donald Trump, is getting a belated stateside rebroadcast. Slightly rechristened "The Apprentice UK," it premieres tonight on BBC America.
SPORTS
September 19, 2000 | DAVE DESMOND
Quarterback Terry Furlow of Palmdale is keeping a stiff upper lip and an even stiffer lower lip. On the third play of the season, Furlow had his lower lip split open against Barstow, but he remained in the game to lead the Falcons to a 14-12 victory. Furlow's numbers weren't great. He completed six of 17 passes for 111 yards. But it wasn't bad considering Palmdale coaches said they could see Furlow's teeth through a gaping hole in his lip.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1990
Last month I saw a small item in The Times that asked the public to write to "Any Servicemen" stationed in the Middle East with Desert Shield. I wrote a one-page letter that reached a Marine sergeant in the desert. I was happy to receive his letter and promptly wrote him back. The following week I received yet another letter from a weather expert on one of the U.S. carriers in the gulf. What really gets my goose bumps going is that I wrote one letter and am receiving numerous letters from different armed forces personnel which means that my letter must be making the rounds through the ranks somehow.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2009 | DAVID LAZARUS
Diane Krup spent more than $200,000 four years ago to buy a small shop in San Juan Capistrano that sells British foods and knickknacks. Then the recession hit. Krup hasn't taken a salary in over a year, and she has been steadily losing money for months. She expects to be out of business soon. "Where's my bailout?" Krup, 49, wants to know. "I'm not asking for a golden handshake. I'm not asking for a lot of money. But there needs to be some way to help small businesses during times like this."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2009 | Greg Braxton
Pitted against edgy procedurals, trendy reality shows or ensemble dramas, NBC's "Law & Order" for nearly 20 years has persevered as one of TV's most recognizable and durable brands. And if it lasts a few more seasons, the hybrid cop-and-lawyer series would eclipse "Gunsmoke" as television's longest-running drama.
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