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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1997 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
The Legislature has earmarked $2.9 million in its new budget for the dredging of Upper Newport Bay, city officials said this week. City and county officials put the cost of restoring the bay at $5 million, but city officials say they are confident that they will get the additional funds to complete the project. Assistant City Manager Peggy Ducey said the city will ask for money from the state's wetlands restoration fund to make up the difference. Upper Newport Bay was last dredged 10 years ago.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2013 | By Gale Holland
The Upper Newport Bay, usually buzzing with kayakers and outdoor enthusiasts, remains closed to swimming and other recreational uses after a sewage spill. The closure includes Newport Dunes, a popular recreation and swimming area. The sewage spill was reported Saturday. Any updates will be posted on the Orange County Health Care Agency's website . ALSO: Balboa Pier remains closed after being slammed by boat Vincent Thomas Bridge will close Labor Day morning for marathon 10 in hospital after tour bus crash on way to San Diego County casino gale.holland@latimes Twitter: @geholland
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Chapman University will set up an undergraduate teaching lab for the long-term study of Upper Newport Bay, university officials announced Monday. The lab will be paid for by a $98,539 grant from the National Science Foundation, they said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2013 | By Gale Holland
On the last big weekend of the summer, bay waters from the Upper Newport Bay to Newport Dunes remain closed to swimming, diving and other recreational uses because of a sewage spill, officials said Sunday. The closure was ordered after a spill Saturday and remains in effect until further notice. Any updates will be posted on Orange County's ocean water protection program site . ALSO: Weather to cool for Labor Day, then heat upĀ  Yosemite fire in the top ten; what are the other nine?
SPORTS
March 22, 1989 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Long before the presence of human beings, the river that would someday be called the Santa Ana carved a half-mile-wide, 3 1/2-mile-long gulch to the sea that thousands of years later would provide a natural haven for some of nature's fragile creatures. The Shoshone tribe of Gabrielinos who hunted and fished there made no significant impact, nor did the Spanish and Mexican settlers of more recent history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1997 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Congress has responded to the request for money to begin dredging Upper Newport Bay, a project that city and county officials say is essential to preserve the environmentally sensitive area. On Thursday, the House Appropriations Committee approved spending $1.27 million of federal funds for clearing sediment from the bay. A vote on the energy and water funding bill by the full House is expected next week. "It's the first step," said Peggy Ducey, Newport Beach's assistant city manager.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1985 | G. M. BUSH, Times Staff Writer
Two chemical spills totaling about 10,000 gallons of pollutants combined Sunday to form a 4 1/2-mile-long, green-colored stream in an Irvine drainage channel and San Diego Creek, with some of the pollutants flowing into Upper Newport Bay. First thought to be a single spill, the murky green liquid was discovered about 8 a.m. at the bottom of the slow-moving creek in Newport Beach near Jamboree Road, where the water flows into Upper Newport Bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1992 | ROSE KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by highways and within view of office buildings, the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve at the heart of this oceanside city is only a remnant of wetlands that once stretched north into Tustin. On weekends, bicyclists and runners follow the two-mile trail that gently curves along the bay beside scenic bluffs, steep cliffs and shallow mud flats. Nature lovers come to glimpse rare, endangered birds such as the brown pelican and the California least tern.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1993
Amid Newport Beach's tangle of homes, freeways and commerce are nearly 1,000 acres of coastal wetlands set aside for wildlife. For 30 years, Upper Newport Bay, known to locals as the Back Bay, has been a publicized battleground between environmentalists who want to preserve the delicate habitat and developers who know the potential the area affords.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writer
Standing on a low mound not far from the water's edge, Frank Robinson looked Wednesday across the marshy expanse of Upper Newport Bay and smiled. "It's a fabulous program," Robinson, a longtime crusader for preservation of the bay, finally said. "It's going to make it that much harder for this delicate setting ever to be destroyed." Protecting the 752 acres of wildlife habitat in Upper Newport Bay has long been a mission for Robinson and other county environmentalists. That's why they view the area's inclusion in the newly created California Wildlands Program as a big step forward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
The Boeing 737 screams out of John Wayne Airport, lifting into the thin, misty clouds over Newport Beach. With its distinctive Southwest Airlines stripes, the jet soars toward the gunmetal gray waters of Upper Newport Bay and then drifts over the multimillion-dollar homes in Dover Shores, where residents are just beginning their Monday. "He didn't turn," notes aviation consultant Ken Shapero, peering skyward. Departing from one of America's most restricted airports - over a city where residents have used their money and political might to fight for peace and quiet - is no simple task.
TRAVEL
January 30, 2011
If you are looking for a nature outing, check out the tours offered by Southwind Kayak rentals. My friends and I explored the tidal wetlands of Upper Newport Bay and observed numerous bird species during a two-hour-plus guided outing via kayak. It was a welcome break from city life, and it's located in our own backyard. Southwind Kayak Center, (949) 261-0200, http://www.southwindkayaks.com . Kayak tours by preregistration only. Harbor Highlights or Back to Nature tour of the Upper Newport Bay ecological reserve, $55, or $45 with your own gear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2010 | By Mike Reicher, Los Angeles Times
Though they might not inspire the same romantic feeling as the swallows returning to Capistrano, ospreys have begun to spread their wings — and domain — in Orange County. A female osprey reared on a man-made platform in Upper Newport Bay recently hatched a chick at another specialized platform a few miles away in Irvine. Experts say this is a positive sign for a species that for decades had no known nests in Southern California. The ospreys, birds of prey once threatened by hunters and the pesticide DDT, have been watched over locally by a group of dedicated conservationists who are just now understanding the species' breeding patterns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2009 | Tony Barboza
Aviation officials are adopting a new satellite-based departure procedure for planes flying out of John Wayne Airport that could save fuel, cut emissions and reduce noise around Upper Newport Bay in Newport Beach. Under current rules, aircraft taking off from John Wayne can start turning around right when they reach the shoreline, but starting next month, the new navigation system will direct planes to fly 1/2 to 3/4 of a mile out over the ocean before turning, said Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2008 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
Everyone agrees that thick sediment deposits are threatening to transform pristine Upper Newport Bay into a meadow. But the biggest threat to the ecologically important estuary may not be the silt and mud clogging it. Instead, the culprit is likely another one: money. Or rather the lack of it. A dredge and barge began work two years ago to remove 2.3 million cubic yards of built-up muck, with a projected cost of nearly $39 million.
SPORTS
January 26, 2007 | Pete Thomas
As the rich folks sip coffee in the warm confines of their sprawling mansions, the intrepid paddlers glide silently by on a brisk winter morning, feeling as though they're in another world. They are surrounded by these magnificent estates, which dot the hilltops and line the waterfront. And they are dwarfed by grand yachts tied to docks leading to the doorsteps of their owners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1999 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To a new generation of hikers, joggers and other weekend warriors who enjoy the Upper Newport Bay, the names Frank and Fran Robinson may not be recognizable. But efforts they began nearly four decades ago helped preserve the area for public use. On Tuesday, county supervisors are expected to name part of the new, $3.8-million Upper Newport Bay Interpretive Center in their honor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1993 | MIMI KO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lauren Greenberg's heart grew sad when she picked up a dead duckling from the marsh at Upper Newport Bay Saturday while stuffing trash bags with cigarette butts, plastic six-pack container rings and foam cups. The 14-year-old girl said she learned a valuable lesson as she stared at the dead bird. "He must have died from choking on our trash," Lauren said. "That's why it's important for us to clean up our environment."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2006 | Tanya Caldwell, Times Staff Writer
The ospreys have landed. Finally. A pair of the birds, which apparently migrated to Upper Newport Bay during the winter, are among the first of the raptors to nest in Southern California in recent decades, environmentalists say. And officials who watch over the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve in Newport Beach said they couldn't be more enthused.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2005 | Sara Lin, Times Staff Writer
On any given morning, bird watchers and plein-air artists admire the Upper Newport Bay and its avian denizens. Joggers and cyclists pause to take it all in, and kayakers paddle through the shallow water. Aside from the occasional passing airplane, the trill of birds dominates the soundscape. But something is wrong. Silt-laden urban runoff from San Diego Creek has clogged the bay, forming mudflats that choke out the tides.
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