Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUpper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve
IN THE NEWS

Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1992 | MIMI KO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Loren Battieste stood on the edge of the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve, mesmerized. Looking out at the 892 acres of open space bordering Back Bay Drive, the fifth-grader couldn't believe the place was real. "It's amazing," he said. "I didn't know something like this could be here (in Orange County), so close. I thought you could only find this kind of place in Big Bear."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2004 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
Upper Newport Bay is quiet and still. An adventure is about to begin for a handful of people at Shellmaker Island: They will spend two hours canoeing the upper reaches of one of Orange County's aquatic treasures. "I was going to take everyone to Long Beach to kayak," said Dorothy Rennick, a retired postal worker from Costa Mesa. "But this is better. Plus it's cheaper."
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1995 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The word traveled downstream by radio: Another sick bird had been found near Upper Newport Bay. A rescue boat emerged through the salt marshes, and a worker handed Mimi Wood-Harris a rumpled white pillowcase that she cradled in her lap en route to a makeshift rescue station. Inside the pillowcase lay an eared grebe, still alive but sluggish from a small but toxic oil spill that sent a dangerous sheen this week into the bird-rich waters of the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2000 | Deniene Husted, (714) 520-2508
The Assn. of California Water Agencies has honored the Irvine Ranch Water District for restoration work done on the San Joaquin Marsh area. The group of statewide water agencies gave the district its Theodore Roosevelt Environmental Award for the work, which is credited with improving the quality of water flowing into Newport Bay and the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve. The marsh-restoration effort took more than 10 years of planning in consultation with local, state and federal agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2000 | Claudia Figueroa, (949) 574-4268
Naturalists will give a free guided tour of Upper Newport Bay at 9 a.m. Saturday at Shellmaker Island. Visitors should meet at the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve, 600 Shellmaker Road. Information: (949) 640-6746.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1995
Kayak Tours--Take a water-level tour of Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve with a naturalist today at 10 a.m. The naturalist will guide the group through the reserve, pointing out wildlife and habitats. To reserve a spot on this tour, call the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve at (714) 640-6746. Kayaks are available through Newport Dunes; rental is $15 per person. To reserve a kayak, call Resort Watersports at (800) 585-0747.
NEWS
January 10, 1989
Two Cub Scouts hiking in the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve found and turned in a suitcase containing more than a pound of cocaine, Newport Beach police said. Ben Courtney, 9, and Casey Luchesi, 8, discovered the brown suitcase hidden in bushes, police spokesman Rick Bradley said. The boys took the suitcase to pack leader Alan W. Courtney, who opened it to find the 570 grams of cocaine. The pack of eight boys and their leader took the suitcase and narcotics to the Police Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2000 | Claudia Figueroa, (949) 574-4268
The Naturalists and Friends of Newport Bay will give their first tour of the season of the Upper Newport Bay Ecological Reserve starting at 9 a.m. Saturday, with a tour group leaving every 15 minutes from the corner of East Bluff Drive and Back Bay Road. This begins the 32nd season of the monthly free tours. Information: (949) 786-8878.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2000 | DAVID HALDANE
A federal bill that would establish a 20-year, $21-million endowment for the dredging and ecological improvement of Upper Newport Bay cleared the last major hurdle Thursday on its path to becoming law, legislators said. "It looks as if my pie-in-the sky dream . . . has made it," said Rep. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach), who has been pushing for the legislation since 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2000 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Much like the ancient Native American cliff dwellings in the Arizona desert, a new nature center in Newport Beach has been built into a bluff. The $8-million Upper Newport Bay Peter and Mary Muth Interpretive Center opens Saturday. The smallish center--with its emphasis on educational exhibits, outreach, entertainment and classroom learning--is mere feet from the Upper Newport Bay Reserve and National Preserve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1998
Work Detail--Pitch in to plant native oak, sycamore and elderberry trees in Laguna Coast Wilderness Park on Saturday and Nov. 21, beginning at 8 a.m. A shuttle will take volunteers from the parking lot near the intersection of El Toro and Laguna Canyon roads to planting sites. Bring a shovel if you have one, hat, sunscreen, sturdy shoes and gloves. Snacks, lunch and a T-shirt will be provided. Community groups and company teams are welcome. Information: (949) 855-7275.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1998 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With state lawmakers unwilling to finance long-term relief for silt-choked Upper Newport Bay, local officials are beginning to eye corrective measures that might keep harmful sediment from ever reaching the ecologically sensitive wetland. Newport Beach officials are hopeful a study planned by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will spotlight steps that could be taken to better catch sediment along San Diego Creek, the main tributary into the upper bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Regional Water Quality Board on Friday postponed a decision on whether to allow the Irvine Ranch Water District to discharge millions of gallons of treated waste water into the Upper Newport Bay. Board members said they want to review the four hours of testimony they heard at Newport Beach City Hall before making a final decision on the project.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|