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WORLD
February 1, 2011
For years, Egyptians fearful of their country's pervasive secret police apparatus would reflexively lower their voices and glance around before daring to speak a word against President Hosni Mubarak. During these heady days in Tahrir, or Liberation, Square, they've felt free to speak their minds, and vent their anger. Asked Tuesday about their president of three decades, some spat out epithets: Pig. Dog. Donkey. The most extreme display of fury might have been a pair of effigies dangling from traffic lights, emblazoned with calls to put Mubarak on trial.
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WORLD
February 18, 2014 | By Victoria Butenko and Carol J. Williams
KIEV, Ukraine - The 3-month-old uprising against Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich flared to a deadly crescendo Tuesday with antigovernment protesters setting fire to the ruling party headquarters and security forces storming their tent camp in what officials labeled "an anti-terror operation. " The Interior Ministry reported that at least nine people were killed: two police officers, an official of the ruling Party of Regions and six protesters. Opposition lawmaker Oleksandra Kuzhel said the death toll had grown to 15 after security forces moved against the encampment with stun grenades and water cannons.
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WORLD
March 16, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
It was to be a face-to-face encounter with one of the captured Al Qaeda militants accused by Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi and his associates of being behind the uprising in this North African nation. But Salah Mohammad Ali Abou Obah, born in 1967, denied being either a militant or a member of Al Qaeda. Rather, he told a group of reporters taken Tuesday to the criminal investigations headquarters in Tripoli, the capital, on Tuesday that he was a low-ranking member of an exiled Islamic opposition group.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
This year's Academy Award documentary short subject nominees prove more substantial than their animation and live-action counterparts. Of the three Oscar shorts categories, the docs - a supersized collection of works broken down here into two separate programs - are the most cohesive bunch, with themes of mortality and reconciliation. Two shorts from Program A feature subjects already well documented elsewhere. "The Lady in Number 6" profiles Alice Herz Sommer, the now-110-year-old pianist who recited Chopin's études from memory while inside the Theresienstadt concentration camp in what is now the Czech Republic.
WORLD
February 11, 2011 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
Chanting anti-U.S. slogans, thousands of Iranians marched in Tehran to commemorate the 32nd anniversary of the Islamic Revolution that toppled the shah ? and to celebrate the Egyptian uprising that resulted in President Hosni Mubarak's ouster Friday. Braving low temperatures and biting winds, people of all ages gathered in Azadi, or Freedom, Square, some sipping fruit juice and waving balloons provided by organizers. Others took advantage of free subway rides offered by authorities.
WORLD
February 13, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Wary of the parallels between Tahrir and Tiananmen, Beijing is hardly celebrating the popular uprising in Egypt that brought down an authoritarian regime. The Chinese government offered a sobering assessment Saturday of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's resignation. Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu said in a statement that China hoped "the latest developments help restore national stability and social order at an early date. " News coverage of the 18-day uprising has emphasized looting, rioting and violence, while downplaying the jubilation of the protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square.
WORLD
February 6, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
It's been a first for many Palestinians. Usually they are the ones fighting on the streets, throwing rocks and choking on tear gas as the rest of the Arab world watches from afar. But now they find themselves transfixed by television images of Arab brethren in Egypt, Jordan and Yemen demanding their rights. The role reversal has left many Palestinians with a sense of solidarity, unease over how events will affect their own bid for statehood and perhaps a little feeling of vindication.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | From Times wire services
Israel's chief of staff, in his strongest rebuff to right-wing politicians demanding a military solution to the Palestinian uprising, has said that only mass deportation, starvation or genocide can stop the revolt. Lt. Gen. Dan Shomron's remarks, broadcast today, followed growing calls from Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir's Likud Party for the army to crush the 18-month-old uprising in the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. "People ask why we don't end the intifada (uprising)
WORLD
January 27, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Even in death they would not allow Marwan Jamli a moment's dignity. The same black-clad Interior Ministry troops who shot him in the chest and back a day earlier tear-gassed his grieving family members as they tried to carry his corpse to the cemetery. The army soldiers watching the Jan. 9 melee in this town near the Algerian border could no longer bear it. They ordered the security forces aside, and allowed his parents to place their elder son in the earth. Some of the soldiers saluted the mourners.
WORLD
August 9, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The military government arrested 48 activists on a protest march to mark the 20th anniversary of a pro-democracy uprising in which an estimated 3,000 people were killed, an opposition official said. The group of mainly young men staged a silent walk through the northwestern town of Taunggok before being stopped by police. Leaders of the 1988 uprising have been behind bars since the start of demonstrations last August over increases in the price of fuel. They are just a few of an estimated 1,100 political prisoners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Gay rights activists have planned a protest Friday afternoon in downtown as the U.S. Olympic Committee brings the Road to Sochi Tour to Los Angeles. The group organizing the event, GetEQUAL , said in a news release that the demonstration will be peaceful but "will mince no words about the oppressive and dangerous anti-gay laws that have recently been passed in Russia. " The group also faults the International Olympic Committee for "deciding to move forward ... despite this law's clear violation of Olympic principles.
WORLD
January 9, 2014 | By Amro Hassan and Laura King
CAIRO -- Tunisia's Islamist prime minister stepped down Thursday, upholding a pledge aimed at breaking a political stalemate and paving the way for new elections in the country where the Arab Spring began. Tunisia is approaching the third anniversary of the overthrow of longtime despotic leader Zine al Abidine ben Ali, an uprising that triggered a series of regional revolts against longtime authoritarian leaders, including Egypt's Hosni Mubarak. Thursday's resignation of the government, announced in a nationally televised news conference by Prime Minister Ali Larayedh, was in line with an earlier agreement between his Islamist Ennahda party, which holds a parliamentary majority, and secular opposition parties.
WORLD
July 8, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- The political wing of the Muslim Brotherhood called for a national uprising in retaliation for an attack by Egyptian security forces Monday that killed at least 42 anti-military protesters during morning prayers. The Freedom and Justice Party “calls on the great Egyptian people to rise up against those who want to steal their revolution with tanks and armored vehicles, even over the dead bodies of the people," it said in a statement. The announcement was a chilling indication of how polarized and dangerous the nation has become in a power struggle between the armed forces and the supporters of former President Mohamed Morsi, a Brotherhood member who last week was deposed in a military coup.
WORLD
July 8, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO - With its people more polarized than ever and the military once again struggling to impose calm, Egypt's downward spiral appears to have no bottom. At least 51 people were killed Monday when army and police forces opened fire on a sit-in during morning prayers. The protesters outside Republican Guard headquarters said they were peacefully calling for the release of the Islamist president, Mohamed Morsi, whom the military deposed last week. The army said it responded to a "terror group" firing weapons and hurling Molotov cocktails.
WORLD
June 8, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos, Los Angeles Times
HOMS, Syria - The grizzled veteran of Syria's civil war was confident of victory, but he didn't underestimate his rebel adversaries dug in just a few hundred yards away in an adjoining corner of the Old City. "They have trained snipers and they're good street fighters," said Abu Yusef, the nickname for the squad leader of a pro-government militia guarding the war-battered Bab Sbaa district, which was wrested from rebel control more than a year ago. "They've been fighting for a while.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
We are so far into our modern infatuation with the zombie apocalypse that it was only a matter of time before a chronicle of the next step emerged. "In the Flesh," which premieres Thursday on BBC America, opens in a rehabilitation center where those suffering from Partial Death Syndrome (PDS) are receiving medical and psychological treatment that will allow them to return to their families. Dominic Mitchell's story, which focuses on 18-year-old Kieren Walker (Luke Newberry) as he transitions back to life among the living, could easily have tipped toward satire à la "Shaun of the Dead" or the sticky sentiment of "Warm Bodies.
MAGAZINE
May 19, 2002
I always get a chuckle when I see an "update" article on the Los Angeles riots ("Searching for a Legacy," by Peter H. King, April 21). Inevitably, a community "activist" denies that a riot occurred. It was, instead, a "moral uprising." Tell me, what was moral about Reginald Denny's beating? Did I miss some lesson when gun shops, liquor stores and hardware stores were looted down to the bare floor? If a lack of education prompted the "uprising," is that why so many schools were broken into--so the rioters could rush into an empty classroom and start studying?
NEWS
July 12, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The Justice Department began an investigation Friday into the fiery uprising at the Lorton, Va., Reformatory, while federal prisons and neighboring states scrambled to make room for convicts displaced by the flames. With the District of Columbia unable to house all of the prisoners because of federal restraints on inmate population at its other jail sites, the Justice Department said it would take 300 of the inmates into federal prisons.
WORLD
June 6, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon and Nicholas Soi, Los Angeles Times
NAIROBI, Kenya - It was not quite a direct apology and it came at least 50 years late. But the British government's "sincere regret" for colonial abuses of Kenyans during the Mau Mau uprising of the 1950s and its agreement to pay $30 million in compensation to surviving victims was the first time Britain has admitted guilt over colonial era abuses, not just in Kenya but anywhere, according to Harvard historian Caroline Elkins. It was also a landmark admission by Britain that its empire was far more violent and sordid than the splendid lyrics of "Rule Britannia" convey, according to Elkins, who was in Nairobi for the announcement.
WORLD
June 1, 2013 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
ZANGABAD, Afghanistan - The uprising began in early February with a Taliban commander's knock on the door of Hajji Abdul Wudood. The militant leader demanded that Wudood, a stout, weathered man of 60, surrender one of his eight sons, who was accused of spying on the Taliban for the Afghan government. What Wudood did next triggered a revolt against the Taliban that has spread to a dozen villages in a region that has been among the nation's most formidable Taliban strongholds. Fed up with beheadings and homemade bombs that killed 60 people in two villages the previous year, Wudood refused to hand over 25-year-old Abdul Hanan.
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