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NEWS
October 23, 1991 | Associated Press
Gov. Bruce G. Sundlun's wife, Marjorie, was seriously injured Tuesday in a traffic accident in Upstate New York. Mrs. Sundlun, 50, was hit by a car while she was walking with a friend in Geneva, N.Y., her hometown, Press Secretary Barbara Cottam said.
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NATIONAL
January 19, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Much of the U.S. is about to get pretty cold again. A huge dome of arctic air will send temperatures plummeting across parts of the Midwest and Northeast early this week in a deep freeze reminiscent of early January's "polar vortex. " Temperatures are expected to go well below zero in Minnesota by Tuesday, with some lows potentially reaching 20 below. Wisconsin, Michigan and upstate New York are expected to see some of the worst of the subzero temperatures through the earliest part of the week.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1989
Mose Znaimer, producer of "Tamara," wants to establish "a new entertainment form" ("Secrets of the Play That Refuses to Close," Feb. 12). However, Znaimer's "living movie" concept is hardly original. A decade ago, director Aileen Passloff staged a production of Maria Irene Fornes' "Fefu and Friends" throughout a Hudson River Valley mansion at my alma mater, Bard College, in Upstate New York. The idea of coming up with something original, especially in Hollywood, is old hat. MARK EBNER Hollywood
NATIONAL
April 25, 2013 | By Tina Susman
Police in upstate New York have solved a 44-year-old hit-and-run that left a 4-year-old girl dead, but the driver who fled on Halloween night in 1968 won't be charged because the statute of limitations has expired. The driver is a man who still lives in the area, and who confessed after a Facebook posting by a retired police officer prompted someone to come forward with information. That information pointed to Douglas Parkhurst, police in Fulton, N.Y., said in a news release Wednesday.
NEWS
June 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An uprising at a Southport prison in Upstate New York last month began when inmates were left unsupervised in an outdoor recreation area by guards who wanted to eat lunch inside, a report from state Correction Commissioner Thomas Coughlin said. "At one point, there were no officers in the yard at all. . . . An incident of serious magnitude could--and, in fact, did--take place without being detected," the report said.
NEWS
June 25, 1989
New York will build the nation's first prison exclusively for drug addicts and alcoholics as part of an $886.6-million plan to put 7,100 more inmates behind bars, Gov. Mario M. Cuomo and legislative leaders said. The deal calls for construction of six new medium-security prisons scattered across Upstate New York. It will also create seven "annexes" built onto existing prisons that would provide drug treatment and counseling for inmates within two years of parole eligibility. The new drug prison, to be built at a cost of $65 million near the U.S. Army Depot in Romulus, Seneca County, will offer comprehensive treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1991
William Bradley Lemery, owner of Photowest/Brad Lemery Gallery in downtown San Diego, died April 9 at Mercy Hospital. He was 39. No cause of death was given. Lemery opened his gallery in 1989, featuring 19th- and 20th-Century photographers, both local and international, whose work ranged from gritty realism to romantic self-portraiture. Lemery was raised in Upstate New York and studied to be a video artist in Canada.
SPORTS
December 12, 1987
Recently we have witnessed the overblown power of the press in the political arena. We should be pleased that their omnipotence has filtered into the world of sports. How else do you explain this year's "Hypesman" award in college football? Tim Brown is a game breaker, a great talent, but capable of being completely neutralized by a cohesive defensive scheme (Miami's). Meanwhile, in Upstate New York, a quarterback leads his team to an undefeated season and in the process dismantles a national champion (Penn State)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The British rock group the Who launched a 25th anniversary tour of North America Wednesday night before an audience of about 5,000 at Glens Falls Civic Center in Upstate New York, playing 40 songs during a three-hour show. Dressed in a baggy gray suit with his hair in a ponytail, lead guitarist Pete Townshend leaped in the air and banged power chords on his instrument with his trademark windmill motion. But in a concession to age and hearing damage caused by years of loud music, Townshend strummed an acoustic guitar for most of the show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1992
Ms. Njeri strikes the nail squarely on the head when she dares to write, "Too much of Afrocentrism reflects a dangerously romantic nationalism." I'm black, but take no particular pride in being black as I don't consider my blackness a personal accomplishment of any note; it's merely genetic coding for which I have no understanding or responsibility. It's academic to me who reared the pyramids, black men or white men. I don't need to embrace the "Eve theory" or the argument that Cleopatra was black in order to feel valid.
NATIONAL
March 13, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A manhunt is underway for a gunman who shot and killed four people at a carwash and a barbershop in upstate New York and local schools are on lockdown, police said Wednesday. Two people were reported wounded. The attacks happened Wednesday morning in Herkimer and Mohawk, two small towns divided by the Mohawk River about halfway between Syracuse and Albany. Herkimer County Community College sent an automated cellphone alert around 10:40 a.m. EDT that identified the gunman as a man in his 60s, with a white beard and driving a red Jeep Cherokee, according to the Associated Press.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
A high school girl died and at least four relatives were injured when a blast leveled their two-story home in upstate New York early Tuesday, officials said. The Johnson family was in their home in Wilson, about 30 miles from Buffalo, when an explosion ripped it apart about 6 a.m., according to the Niagara County sheriff's office. Sarah Johnson, 14, who would have been a ninth-grader at Wilson Central High School in September, was killed in the blast. The explosion could reportedly be felt four miles away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2011 | los angeles times staff and wire reports
Tom Wicker, a former New York Times political reporter, columnist and Washington bureau chief who covered President Kennedy's assassination in Dallas and became part of the news as a mediator during the 1971 Attica prison riot in upstate New York, has died. He was 85. Wicker, who was also the author of fiction and nonfiction works, died Friday of an apparent heart attack at his home in Rochester, Vt., according to his wife, Pamela. A native of North Carolina, Wicker decided while in high school to become a journalist and worked as a newspaper reporter in North Carolina before joining the New York Times in 1960.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2011 | Don Lee
If there's hope for 51-year-old Brett Miller, then you could say there's hope for the American dream. When Miller was a boy, upstate New York and the Hudson River Valley embodied the industrial might of the nation and the broad-based prosperity that made middle-class families such as Miller's the envy of the world. For 40 years, his father earned a good living from the sprawling General Electric Co. complex in Schenectady that built steam turbines for the nation's electric power companies and nuclear engines for its submarines.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Nestled among the glens and groves of western New York, about 60 miles south of Buffalo, sits the 130-year-old community of Lily Dale, the self-described World's Largest Center for the Religion of Spiritualism. It is a town peopled by mediums and healers, folks who will draw the toxins from your body by waving a green pepper at your back, analyze your aura or — and this is what attracts most of the thousands of seekers and sightseers who pass through each year — get in touch with your late loved ones, gone to that undiscovered country from which no traveler returns but where operators are standing by. Although it sounds like the premise for a new SyFy series it is instead the subject of Steve Cantor's video documentary "No One Dies in Lily Dale," which premieres Monday on HBO. "Lily Dale is to spiritualism as Rome is to Catholicism," says one resident, the comparative proportions of those burgs describing as well the relative size of the churches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2009 | Louis Sahagun
In his role as editor of the online magazine Lapis, Ralph White is scholarly and staid, offering literary explorations of myths, traditions, symbols and lore that have swayed thought for centuries. But once a year, White, 60, leads a number of adventurous souls on quests for the deeper mysteries of spiritual experience in castles, cathedrals, temples, tombs and ancient ruins around the world. Last week, White and 65 others have been on "An Esoteric Quest for Inner America" in Rip Van Winkle country, or upstate New York, which is the birthplace of such homegrown spiritual and cultural movements as the 19th century utopian Oneida Community and the 1969 Woodstock festival.
NEWS
February 5, 1988
A fast-moving winter storm roared into the Northeast, bringing a foot of snow, shutting down schools and making travel treacherous. At least two fatal traffic accidents were blamed on the icy conditions. Vermonters woke up to find as much as 10 inches of new snow on the ground, with accumulations topping a foot in higher elevations. Snow fell throughout New England at the rate of up to 2 inches per hour.
NATIONAL
January 19, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Much of the U.S. is about to get pretty cold again. A huge dome of arctic air will send temperatures plummeting across parts of the Midwest and Northeast early this week in a deep freeze reminiscent of early January's "polar vortex. " Temperatures are expected to go well below zero in Minnesota by Tuesday, with some lows potentially reaching 20 below. Wisconsin, Michigan and upstate New York are expected to see some of the worst of the subzero temperatures through the earliest part of the week.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2009 | Associated Press
The woman who barely escaped with her daughter when a commuter plane plowed into their house, killing her husband and all 49 people aboard, returned to the disaster scene Wednesday. While she was there, investigators continued to collect evidence they hope will tell them what brought down the aircraft. Karen Wielinski, 57, and her daughter Jill, 22, were escorted by police to the site where her home once sat.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2006 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
With the initial enrollment period for the Medicare prescription drug plan more than half over, President Bush played the pitchman Tuesday, campaigning at a community meeting and senior residence to encourage participation in the program. "Take a look!" the president said, his voice rising. "It's a good deal." For 34 minutes, the president was the emcee of a traveling infomercial, calling on his experts to talk about the drug program's benefits.
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