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Upton Sinclair

HOME & GARDEN
February 23, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The house that social reformer and novelist Upton Sinclair lived in during the 1940s through the '60s has come on the market in Monrovia at $1.5 million. Built in 1923, the Spanish Colonial Revival-style residence is listed on the National Register of Historical Places and is a National Historic Landmark. High arched windows, Mission Revival roof parapets and an ornate arched doorway are among the original features. French doors open off the living room and formal dining room to a covered side patio.
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NEWS
October 17, 1989
George H. Shellenberger, 89, former executive of the Merchants and Manufacturers' Assn. in Los Angeles and the principal volunteer of the United for California campaign fund, which encouraged the candidacies of conservatives seeking a seat in the state Legislature. He also, in 1924, helped organize the Los Angeles Community Chest.
BOOKS
February 16, 1992 | Charles Solomon
Hendrickson has compiled 1,200 stories, quotes and bon mots about American authors, many of them humorous. Don Marquis, the creator of Archie and Mehitabel, compared publishing a book of poetry in America to "dropping a rose petal down the Grand Canyon and waiting for the echo."
FOOD
April 7, 1994 | DANIEL P. PUZO
Most people imagine government-sponsored conferences to be dull events. But when Edward L. Menning DVM, executive vice president of the National Assn. of Federal Veterinarians, spoke at a food safety summit hosted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Washington March 31, the audience encountered the Howard Beale of the food world.
OPINION
February 21, 2008
Re "Lost in the Hollywood jungle," Opinion, Feb. 19 I had a different reaction from Ernest Freeberg to the movie "There Will Be Blood." Granted that Upton Sinclair's socialist message was not explicit, I thought that the character of Daniel Plainview and his ruthless, evil drive was a metaphor for the strengths and evils of the oil industry itself. Shirley A. Conger Corona del Mar -- Sinclair's book, "Oil!," was published shortly after the Teapot Dome scandal. We continue to celebrate a crook named Edward L. Doheny, who made a fortune from a bribe.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times
After Walt Disney died in 1966, his grieving staff sealed his office suite in Burbank, and even as work proceeded on "The Jungle Book" there was anxiety that the company's past might be brighter than its future. Four years later, those worries deepened as key executives approached retirement, including Walt's older brother, Roy O. Disney. That's why, in 1970, the company handed the key to Walt's still-sealed office to a former UCLA research librarian named Dave Smith, who was sent into the chamber to learn its history.
MAGAZINE
September 20, 1998 | PATT MORRISON
At intervals of a half-century or so, a utopian spirit was known to move across the country. With its propulsion, people struck out from old homes and old ways for the newer, the better, the purer. The Transcendentalists at Brook Farm in New England. The Oneida community, remembered now for forks and spoons. The Amana colony, living on vestigially in side-by-side refrigerators. And, of course, the original rigid utopians, the "my way or the highway" crowd who disembarked from the Mayflower.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1998
Shortly after Upton Sinclair's 1906 book "The Jungle" exposed the filth in Chicago's meat processing plants, Congress passed a law requiring daily inspections. That law halted hazardous practices like processing meat from long-dead animals. As a new report by the National Academy of Sciences points out, however, today's food safety system has itself become a jungle: an impenetrable thicket of outdated rules enforced by a dozen federal agencies.
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