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NEWS
May 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Floods have killed at least 14 people, wrecked hundreds of homes and forced the evacuation of 20,000 in the Bashkir region of the southern Ural Mountains, news reports said. The flooding began about a week ago when the Belaya, or White River, overflowed its banks because of heavy rains and melting snow. Damage from the flooding was estimated at $161 million, Postfactum said.
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WORLD
December 23, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Weapons designer Mikhail Kalashnikov, whose eponymous assault rifle changed the face of international conflict, died Monday at a clinic in central Russia. He was 94. The creator of the legendary AK-47, which became widely known as the Kalashnikov, was hospitalized a month ago with stomach bleeding for which he was operated on, the ITAR-TASS news agency reported. Until his last day, Kalashnikov was the head of Izhmash, a weapons manufacturing plant in Izhevsk, the capital of the central Russian republic of Udmurtia.
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NEWS
October 11, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin moved with such speed to expand his power in the wake of August's abortive coup, many began to reassess their views of the man initially hailed as democracy's hero. But here in the city that knows his political style better than any, there are no such worries.
WORLD
October 17, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been corrected and updated. See below for details.
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- Ukrainian astronomers say an asteroid might collide with Earth in a couple of decades, a Russian news service reported Thursday. Space watchers from the observatory in the Crimean peninsula said they discovered an asteroid about 1,345 feet in diameter, which they call 2013 TV135, that is approaching Earth at a potentially dangerous trajectory, RIA Novosti said. The astronomers calculated the date of a potential collision as Aug. 26, 2032, the news service said, but they acknowledged the odds of an impact as 1 in 63,000.
NEWS
December 13, 1985
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev said his country has dismantled the launchers for SS-20 missiles that he previously said had been withdrawn from standby alert in Europe, Tass news agency said. In Paris in October, Gorbachev said missiles that had been on standby alert west of the Ural Mountains had been removed. These missiles were in addition to the 243 SS-20s already deployed on Soviet territory in Europe.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
The deliberate detonation of an atomic bomb during a 1954 military exercise in the Ural Mountains killed and injured large numbers of servicemen, a report in Izvestia said. The government daily published the account of an officer who took part in the exercise, but it gave no exact casualty toll. He said many survivors suffered long-term effects of exposure to radiation. The use of the bomb to test troops' battle readiness was first disclosed last month by the army daily Krasnaya Zvezda.
NEWS
December 1, 1988
Satellite photographs showing the site of a Soviet nuclear accident said to have occurred in 1957--but never acknowledged by Moscow--were published by a Swedish space research company. The computer-enhanced images showed that a 100-square-mile area around a military nuclear complex east of the Ural Mountains was still abandoned three decades after the disaster. About 30 villages that appeared on pre-1950 maps were overgrown or destroyed.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | From Times wire services
The Soviet Union officially acknowledged for the first time today that there was a powerful nuclear explosion at an atomic weapons plant in the Ural Mountains in September, 1957. The accident, kept secret by authorities until now, created a radioactive trail 65 miles long and 5 to 6 miles wide, and forced the evacuation of more than 10,000 people, the official Tass news agency said. More than 30 years later, large areas around the town of Kasli, 60 miles north of the city of Chelyabinsk, were still contaminated and water reserves were undrinkable, it said.
WORLD
October 17, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been corrected and updated. See below for details.
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia -- Ukrainian astronomers say an asteroid might collide with Earth in a couple of decades, a Russian news service reported Thursday. Space watchers from the observatory in the Crimean peninsula said they discovered an asteroid about 1,345 feet in diameter, which they call 2013 TV135, that is approaching Earth at a potentially dangerous trajectory, RIA Novosti said. The astronomers calculated the date of a potential collision as Aug. 26, 2032, the news service said, but they acknowledged the odds of an impact as 1 in 63,000.
WORLD
December 23, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Weapons designer Mikhail Kalashnikov, whose eponymous assault rifle changed the face of international conflict, died Monday at a clinic in central Russia. He was 94. The creator of the legendary AK-47, which became widely known as the Kalashnikov, was hospitalized a month ago with stomach bleeding for which he was operated on, the ITAR-TASS news agency reported. Until his last day, Kalashnikov was the head of Izhmash, a weapons manufacturing plant in Izhevsk, the capital of the central Russian republic of Udmurtia.
SPORTS
May 26, 2013 | By David Wharton
Just watch Slava Voynov drift toward the goal, holding the puck on his stick, waiting. There hasn't been much room to shoot in these playoffs, not with Voynov and the Kings facing a couple of teams, the St. Louis Blues and San Jose Sharks, that like to clog the middle. "You need time," he said. "Try to find a good time, a good spot. " Voynov, 23, has found enough of those moments to score four goals in the postseason, tied for best among NHL defensemen. His offensive output has helped the Kings gain a 3-2 lead over San Jose in a Western Conference semifinal series.
WORLD
December 5, 2009 | By Sergei L. Loiko
Indoor pyrotechnics sparked a blaze in a packed nightclub in the Russian city of Perm early today that killed at least 102 people and injured 135, emergency ministry officials said. Many of the victims succumbed to fumes or were trampled as partygoers stampeded toward the doors and jammed the exits of the Lame Horse nightclub, which was especially crowded because the establishment was celebrating its eighth anniversary, said Darya Kochneva, a spokeswoman for the regional office of the Russian Ministry of Emergency Situations.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | CHARLES J. HANLEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
"Does it trouble you, Mikhail Timofeyevich, that your creation has killed so many people around the world?" The kind-eyed old gentleman had heard the question before. Clearly, he has even put it to himself at times, in those long winters hidden away in the Russian heartland. "All I can say," he replied, "is that terrorists would have found something else to kill people with, even if there weren't my Kalashnikovs." Forget Clinton. Forget Yeltsin. Forget Marx and Mohammed.
NEWS
October 11, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin moved with such speed to expand his power in the wake of August's abortive coup, many began to reassess their views of the man initially hailed as democracy's hero. But here in the city that knows his political style better than any, there are no such worries.
NEWS
May 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Floods have killed at least 14 people, wrecked hundreds of homes and forced the evacuation of 20,000 in the Bashkir region of the southern Ural Mountains, news reports said. The flooding began about a week ago when the Belaya, or White River, overflowed its banks because of heavy rains and melting snow. Damage from the flooding was estimated at $161 million, Postfactum said.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
The deliberate detonation of an atomic bomb during a 1954 military exercise in the Ural Mountains killed and injured large numbers of servicemen, a report in Izvestia said. The government daily published the account of an officer who took part in the exercise, but it gave no exact casualty toll. He said many survivors suffered long-term effects of exposure to radiation. The use of the bomb to test troops' battle readiness was first disclosed last month by the army daily Krasnaya Zvezda.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | From Times wire services
The Soviet Union officially acknowledged for the first time today that there was a powerful nuclear explosion at an atomic weapons plant in the Ural Mountains in September, 1957. The accident, kept secret by authorities until now, created a radioactive trail 65 miles long and 5 to 6 miles wide, and forced the evacuation of more than 10,000 people, the official Tass news agency said. More than 30 years later, large areas around the town of Kasli, 60 miles north of the city of Chelyabinsk, were still contaminated and water reserves were undrinkable, it said.
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