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WORLD
May 22, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON -- Iran further increased its uranium enrichment capacity in the last three months, yet it also limited its progress in certain sensitive areas of its disputed nuclear program in an apparent attempt to avoid risking retaliation from Israel or the United States, according to a report issued Wednesday by the United Nations nuclear watchdog agency. The report by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna said that since February Iran has added more than 520 advanced-design IR-2M centrifuges at its plant in Natanz.
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NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Jay Jones
A wealth of movies will bring a blend of education and entertainment next month to the Big Island and will include several premiere screenings, one of which was produced by ukulele legend Eddie Kamae. The Waimea Ocean Film Festival begins Jan. 2 and continues for nine days at various venues on Hawaii . More than 50 documentary and feature films  will be shown. Among the titles are several highlighting Hawaiian culture. Others examine environmental issues, including the oceans.
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WORLD
October 15, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Ramin Mostaghim, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
GENEVA -- Iran's new proposal for ending the crisis over its nuclear program insists on the country's right to enrich uranium and demands removal of all sanctions on its economy, an Iranian news agency reported. The Iranian Student News Agency reported that the proposal, which was presented Tuesday morning at negotiations with six world powers in Geneva, says Iran will cooperate with the United Nations' nuclear watchdog agency, and on other “areas of concern.” But the proposal, as described by ISNA, doesn't include some details Western officials have hoped to see, such as an end to the creation of medium-enriched uranium, which can be easily converted into nuclear bomb fuel.
WORLD
December 10, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - House lawmakers complained to Secretary of State John F. Kerry on Tuesday that a proposed nuclear deal with Iran yields too much by potentially opening the way for the Islamic Republic to continue enriching uranium at low levels. On Kerry's first visit to Congress to publicly explain the preliminary agreement reached in Geneva two weeks ago, House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce (R-Fullerton) said Iran “simply can't be trusted with enrichment technology.” “Iran, from our standpoint, does not need this technology to generate electricity,” he said.
WORLD
February 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Ukrainian border guards arrested a man trying to take nearly a pound of uranium into Hungary, border guard spokesman Yevheniy Bargman said. Guards arrested the driver of a van at the Tisa checkpoint after finding the material, he said. It was unclear whether the uranium was in ore form or had been enriched for potential use in reactors or weapons.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A state regulatory decision to impose a more stringent health standard for uranium in groundwater has been unanimously upheld by the state Court of Appeals in Santa Fe. The New Mexico Water Quality Commission adopted the new standard in 2004, and the mining industry went to court to challenge the decision.
WORLD
September 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Twenty-four pounds of highly enriched uranium, enough for a crude nuclear weapon, was secretly flown to Russia last week from a research lab in Uzbekistan, where Washington had feared terrorists could obtain the material, the U.S. Energy Department said. The material came from nuclear fuel assemblies kept at a research reactor near Tashkent, the capital. It is to be turned into low-enriched uranium that will no longer be suitable for a weapon.
OPINION
June 7, 2003
Contrary to implications in Deborah Blum's "A Dark Magic in America's Silver Bullets" (Opinion, June 1) and the accompanying picture, it's unclear that the depleted uranium remaining after a battle is any more harmful or dangerous than other battle debris. Radiation emitted from DU is so low that it will generally not register on a radiation badge. In other words, you probably couldn't detect it out of the background radiation that we encounter daily. You're more likely to be harmed by the radiation you absorb at the beach than you are by being around DU. The half-life of U-238, which is overwhelmingly the primary isotope of DU, is not 109 years, as stated in Blum's piece.
WORLD
September 26, 2009 | Greg Miller and Jim Tankersley
In an admission that is certain to heighten concerns over Iran's nuclear capabilities, Tehran has informed the United Nations that it has been building a secret uranium enrichment plant, according to a statement released today by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Speaking before the Group of 20 summit in Pittsburgh, President Obama said the plant is a "direct challenge" to global nonproliferation. He added, "Iran must comply with U.N. Security Council resolutions and make clear it is prepared to meet its responsibilities as a member of the community of nations."
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Depleted uranium used by NATO in armor-piercing weapons in Kosovo had no detectable effect on health, a European Union panel of experts concluded. The findings concurred with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's own studies, which said there was no link between depleted uranium, a substance used for its penetrating power, and cancer among peacekeeping troops. U.S. aircraft used munitions containing depleted uranium, a slightly radioactive heavy metal, in Kosovo and Bosnia-Herzegovina.
WORLD
November 19, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Ramin Mostaghim
GENEVA - On the eve of a new round of talks, Iran's foreign minister appeared to suggest a way Tehran and the West can finesse the touchy question of whether the Islamic Republic will continue to enrich uranium for its nuclear program. Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif released a five-minute online video that describes the negotiations that begin Wednesday in Geneva as a "historic opportunity" and urges the West to participate with respect and equal treatment of Iran so that the talks will be successful.
WORLD
November 7, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - Iran and six world powers appeared to close in on a preliminary agreement in Geneva on Thursday that would begin to limit Tehran's nuclear development after a decade of frustrating negotiations, according to diplomats. They said the proposed framework agreement, which could still falter, would require Iran to halt at least some enrichment activities in exchange for partial easing of economic sanctions. They described the expected accord as a significant first step intended to buy six months and perhaps longer to pursue a comprehensive final agreement.
WORLD
October 15, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Ramin Mostaghim, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
GENEVA -- Iran's new proposal for ending the crisis over its nuclear program insists on the country's right to enrich uranium and demands removal of all sanctions on its economy, an Iranian news agency reported. The Iranian Student News Agency reported that the proposal, which was presented Tuesday morning at negotiations with six world powers in Geneva, says Iran will cooperate with the United Nations' nuclear watchdog agency, and on other “areas of concern.” But the proposal, as described by ISNA, doesn't include some details Western officials have hoped to see, such as an end to the creation of medium-enriched uranium, which can be easily converted into nuclear bomb fuel.
WORLD
October 14, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - After a decade of stalemate, diplomats from Iran, the U.S. and five other nations are about to meet for talks that will provide the clearest evidence yet of whether recent signs of a thaw in relations presage an agreement over Tehran's nuclear ambitions. Iran wants assurances at the talks Tuesday and Wednesday in Geneva that if it plunges into serious negotiations, it might win international approval to enrich uranium. Although uranium enriched at low levels is used to fuel civilian power plants, many nations fear that Iran, despite denials, wants to enrich it to high levels for use in bombs.
WORLD
October 14, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Iran and six major powers have been at odds for a decade over the Islamic republic's development of nuclear capabilities, at the heart of negotiations set to resume Tuesday in Geneva. Hopes of budging the high-stakes diplomatic standoff from impasse have been raised by the conciliatory words of Iran's recently inaugurated President Hassan Rouhani. But many in the West point out that Iran has yet to match its hopeful promises with verifiable deeds to show its nuclear programs aren't aimed at building atomic weapons.
NATIONAL
September 24, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
The cost of a proposed uranium processing facility for nuclear weapons in Oakridge, Tenn., has soared as high as $11.6 billion - 19 times the original estimate - even as critics accuse the Energy Department of overstating the need for spare bomb parts. Under a proposal unveiled in 2005, the manufacturing plant at the Y-12 National Security Complex would produce new uranium cores for the nation's stockpile of aging hydrogen bombs. But not long after the plan was disclosed, with an estimated cost of $600 million, the price tag began to climb.
WORLD
April 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Australia has agreed to sell China uranium for nuclear power stations despite concerns that Beijing could divert the material to atomic weapons. The countries' foreign ministers signed two agreements that included assurances that China would not build bombs with uranium from Australia.
WORLD
March 3, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Uranium seized by Colombian authorities was depleted and could not be used to make a nuclear bomb or "dirty bomb" to spread radiation, officials said. Two suspects said they didn't realize the metal was uranium and were not trying to sell it. One of them, Javier Francisco Sanchez, told RCN television that he had received the uranium from a scrap-metal merchant. Soldiers and police arrested Sanchez and a woman in Bogota, the capital, on Feb. 24 and seized 29.
WORLD
May 22, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON -- Iran further increased its uranium enrichment capacity in the last three months, yet it also limited its progress in certain sensitive areas of its disputed nuclear program in an apparent attempt to avoid risking retaliation from Israel or the United States, according to a report issued Wednesday by the United Nations nuclear watchdog agency. The report by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna said that since February Iran has added more than 520 advanced-design IR-2M centrifuges at its plant in Natanz.
SCIENCE
March 21, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
More than 200 million years ago, toothy crocodile-like creatures stalked a hot, dry mega-continent while squid-like mollusks with spiral shells drifted in the surrounding ocean. Then, in what passes for an instant in geologic time, they vanished - making way for the age of the dinosaurs. How some 50% of terrestrial vertebrates and an even larger share of marine life died off in the late Triassic period has become more clear from new research published online Thursday in the journal Science.
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