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NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Jay Jones
A wealth of movies will bring a blend of education and entertainment next month to the Big Island and will include several premiere screenings, one of which was produced by ukulele legend Eddie Kamae. The Waimea Ocean Film Festival begins Jan. 2 and continues for nine days at various venues on Hawaii . More than 50 documentary and feature films  will be shown. Among the titles are several highlighting Hawaiian culture. Others examine environmental issues, including the oceans.
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NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Jay Jones
A wealth of movies will bring a blend of education and entertainment next month to the Big Island and will include several premiere screenings, one of which was produced by ukulele legend Eddie Kamae. The Waimea Ocean Film Festival begins Jan. 2 and continues for nine days at various venues on Hawaii . More than 50 documentary and feature films  will be shown. Among the titles are several highlighting Hawaiian culture. Others examine environmental issues, including the oceans.
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NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON — The Obama administration announced Monday that it intends to place a 20-year ban on mining 1 million acres of land bordering the Grand Canyon, an area where uranium mining claims have spiked 2,000% in the last seven years. The ban would strengthen a moratorium on new mining claims and activity, which the administration placed on Grand Canyon border lands two years ago in response to the jump in uranium stakes. Interior Department officials said the agency initially would extend the current moratorium another six months, until December, in order to complete the steps necessary to establish the 20-year ban. Mines currently in operation would not be affected.
OPINION
January 11, 2012
Nothing spoils a good hike through the wilderness like radioactive streams. That's one of the reasons all Americans, but particularly Arizonans who benefit from the tourism magnet that is the Grand Canyon, should be thankful to the Obama administration for its decision Monday to withdraw about 1 million acres in the vicinity of the national park from new mining claims for the next 20 years. Congressional Republicans, led by politicians such as Arizona Rep. Jeff Flake who are heavily backed by the mining industry, turned the Grand Canyon decision into an important plank of a broad anti-environmental campaign last year, throwing up numerous bills and amendments to prevent the Interior Department from withdrawing these lands from new claims.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2010 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Studded with vivid character sketches and evocative descriptions of the American landscape, journalist Judy Pasternak's scarifying account of uranium mining's disastrous consequences often reads like a novel — though you will wish that the bad guys got punished as effectively as they do in commercial fiction. Real life is complicated, and Pasternak, a veteran of 24 years with the Los Angeles Times, does justice to the historical and ethical ambiguities of her tale while crafting a narrative of exemplary clarity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2000 | DEBORAH HASTINGS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Inside the stifling cinder-block house of Dorothy Joe, nothing moves but waves of grief. One by one, the old widow and her children begin to sob, as if despair were contagious. The weeping circle begins and ends with her, sitting at the dining room table, staring at weathered hands as if they held answers. She murmurs in Navajo, describing the white man's prized uranium and how it destroyed her husband. "They never told us it would kill us," says David Joe, 38, choking on his tears.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
One million acres of public land near the Grand Canyon would be off-limits to new uranium mining under an emergency declaration adopted by a House committee. Tapping a rare provision not used in more than 20 years, the House Natural Resources Committee voted 20 to 2 to stop new claims to uranium for up to three years on land adjacent to the national park. Supporters of the measure, which was advanced by Democrat Raul M. Grijalva of Arizona, said a rush of claims to mine the area threatened the natural landscape that lures 5 million visitors to the park each year.
NATIONAL
April 14, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
Mining claims threaten to mar the borders of 10 iconic national parks and wilderness areas, particularly the Grand Canyon, where uranium claims have increased 2,000% since 2004, according to a new report by the Pew Environment Group. Mining companies have filed claims to the rights to copper, gold and other metals in addition to uranium in areas around Mt. Rushmore, Joshua Tree National Park and other famous refuges at an increased rate in the last five to seven years because of rising global prices, the Pew report said.
OPINION
August 5, 2011
House Republicans, especially those of the "tea party" ilk, think they know the cause of our country's economic woes: environmental regulations. As a result, they loaded up the appropriations bill that funds the Interior Department and the Environmental Protection Agency with dozens of riders that would encourage deadly pollution of the air and water, set back efforts to reduce greenhouse gases and allow uranium mining near the Grand Canyon, among other...
OPINION
January 11, 2012
Nothing spoils a good hike through the wilderness like radioactive streams. That's one of the reasons all Americans, but particularly Arizonans who benefit from the tourism magnet that is the Grand Canyon, should be thankful to the Obama administration for its decision Monday to withdraw about 1 million acres in the vicinity of the national park from new mining claims for the next 20 years. Congressional Republicans, led by politicians such as Arizona Rep. Jeff Flake who are heavily backed by the mining industry, turned the Grand Canyon decision into an important plank of a broad anti-environmental campaign last year, throwing up numerous bills and amendments to prevent the Interior Department from withdrawing these lands from new claims.
OPINION
August 5, 2011
House Republicans, especially those of the "tea party" ilk, think they know the cause of our country's economic woes: environmental regulations. As a result, they loaded up the appropriations bill that funds the Interior Department and the Environmental Protection Agency with dozens of riders that would encourage deadly pollution of the air and water, set back efforts to reduce greenhouse gases and allow uranium mining near the Grand Canyon, among other...
NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON — The Obama administration announced Monday that it intends to place a 20-year ban on mining 1 million acres of land bordering the Grand Canyon, an area where uranium mining claims have spiked 2,000% in the last seven years. The ban would strengthen a moratorium on new mining claims and activity, which the administration placed on Grand Canyon border lands two years ago in response to the jump in uranium stakes. Interior Department officials said the agency initially would extend the current moratorium another six months, until December, in order to complete the steps necessary to establish the 20-year ban. Mines currently in operation would not be affected.
NATIONAL
April 14, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
Mining claims threaten to mar the borders of 10 iconic national parks and wilderness areas, particularly the Grand Canyon, where uranium claims have increased 2,000% since 2004, according to a new report by the Pew Environment Group. Mining companies have filed claims to the rights to copper, gold and other metals in addition to uranium in areas around Mt. Rushmore, Joshua Tree National Park and other famous refuges at an increased rate in the last five to seven years because of rising global prices, the Pew report said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2010 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Studded with vivid character sketches and evocative descriptions of the American landscape, journalist Judy Pasternak's scarifying account of uranium mining's disastrous consequences often reads like a novel — though you will wish that the bad guys got punished as effectively as they do in commercial fiction. Real life is complicated, and Pasternak, a veteran of 24 years with the Los Angeles Times, does justice to the historical and ethical ambiguities of her tale while crafting a narrative of exemplary clarity.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
One million acres of public land near the Grand Canyon would be off-limits to new uranium mining under an emergency declaration adopted by a House committee. Tapping a rare provision not used in more than 20 years, the House Natural Resources Committee voted 20 to 2 to stop new claims to uranium for up to three years on land adjacent to the national park. Supporters of the measure, which was advanced by Democrat Raul M. Grijalva of Arizona, said a rush of claims to mine the area threatened the natural landscape that lures 5 million visitors to the park each year.
NATIONAL
March 13, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A trio of environmental groups sued the U.S. Forest Service on Wednesday for approving a series of uranium exploration sites within miles of Grand Canyon National Park. The Forest Service gave British mining company VANE Minerals Group permission to drill at as many as 39 locations in Kaibab National Forest in northern Arizona. The company is seeking commercial quantities of uranium, which has soared in price. Drilling could begin in December.
NEWS
October 3, 1986 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Times Staff Writer
In July, 1982, film distributor John Hoskyns-Abrahall made plans to ship overseas prints of "In Our Own Backyards: Uranium Mining in the United States," a documentary exploring the health and environmental impact of uranium mining on a Navajo Indian reservation in New Mexico. As he has often done in the nine years since opening tiny Bullfrog Films in Oley, Pa.
OPINION
November 26, 2006
DURING WORLD WAR II, the federal government made a deal with Navajos: If the tribe allowed uranium mining on its 27,000-square-mile reservation, the land eventually would be returned "in as good condition as received." Instead, when the diggers left by the mid-1960s, the land was scarred by open shafts, contaminated well water and radioactive piles -- often without fences or warning signs. As a Times series (latimes.
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