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Uranium

WORLD
November 1, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Iranian lawmakers -- shouting "Death to America" -- unanimously approved the outline of a bill requiring the government to resume uranium enrichment. Britain, France and Germany have offered Iran a trade deal and peaceful nuclear technology in return for an indefinite stop to uranium enrichment. Uranium enriched to a low level can be used as fuel in power plants, but if enriched further, it can be used in nuclear weapons. The U.S.
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NEWS
April 22, 1995 | From Associated Press
Police have arrested nine people accused of smuggling about 110 pounds of uranium from Ukraine, Slovak authorities said Friday. Authorities told the International Atomic Energy Agency that the material was Uranium 238, which is not the type used to produce nuclear bombs and is unregulated, said the U.N. agency's spokesman, David Kyd. But Kyd said the agency, based in Vienna, had yet to receive a laboratory analysis. The four Slovaks, three Hungarians and two Ukrainians were arrested Wednesday.
WORLD
March 8, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The head of Congo's atomic energy commission has been arrested on suspicion of illegally selling uranium found in the nation, officials said Wednesday. Fortunat Lumu and one of his aides were arrested Tuesday, Atty. Gen. Tshimanga Mukendi said. He declined to give details.
NEWS
February 7, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Some workers at a federal uranium processing plant in Paducah, Ky., participated in experiments in the 1950s that had them breathing the radioactive element, the Courier-Journal of Louisville reported. Some of the participants at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant volunteered for the tests, but some may not have been informed of the dangers, according to a draft report by the Department of Energy on an investigation of health, safety and environmental problems at the western Kentucky plant.
WORLD
May 24, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
North Korea has emerged as a possible supplier in a clandestine nuclear network, with diplomats saying the communist country was the likely source of nearly 2 tons of uranium that Libya bought for its now-scrapped weapons program. The revelations intensified concern that Iran and other nations also could have obtained fuel, components and the knowledge to build nuclear arms from Pyongyang.
NEWS
October 23, 1987 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
A nuclear-powered Soviet spy satellite that fell to Earth in 1983 apparently burned up in the upper atmosphere, releasing at least 80% of the 110 pounds of radioactive uranium in its reactor, U.S. scientists said in a report published today. That radioactivity has dispersed throughout the upper atmosphere, increasing the amount of the most radioactive form of uranium there by 50%, Department of Energy researchers said in the new issue of Science magazine.
WORLD
December 25, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Moscow told Iran it remained ready to build a joint-venture plant to enrich uranium in Russia, just days after a European Union diplomat said Tehran had dismissed the compromise plan at talks in Vienna. The idea, which would allow Tehran to establish a nuclear energy program but transfer enrichment to Russia, is aimed at ending a stalemate between Iran and the West. The West suspects Tehran of seeking to develop nuclear weapons under the cover of producing electricity.
WORLD
January 25, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Republic of Georgia authorities, aided by the CIA, set up a sting last summer that led to the arrest of a Russian who tried to sell a small amount of bomb-grade uranium in a plastic bag in his jacket pocket, U.S. and Georgian officials said. The operation, which neither government has publicized, represents one of the most serious cases of smuggling of nuclear material in recent years, according to analysts and officials.
WORLD
October 28, 2009 | Borzou Daragahi
Iran will offer to amend a proposed deal to transfer the bulk of its nuclear material abroad to be transformed into fuel for a peaceful Tehran medical reactor, state television reported today. Iran will respond to an American-backed International Atomic Energy Agency proposal within 48 hours but its counteroffer will include "important adjustments," said Iran's state-controlled Al Alam, citing unnamed sources. The Arabic-language television news channel often broadcasts official news or floats trial balloons before other networks.
WORLD
September 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Iran will begin extracting uranium from deep under its central desert in 2006, an official told Associated Press during a tour of the nation's Saghand uranium mine, 300 miles south of Tehran. Iran says its nuclear ambitions are peaceful, despite U.S. charges that it seeks nuclear weapons. Tehran is seeking to control the whole nuclear fuel cycle, from mining uranium ore to enriching uranium to be used in reactors. "We will be able to extract uranium ore in the first half of 2006....
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