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Urban Blight

REAL ESTATE
July 28, 1991 | BETSY BATES, Bates is a free-lance writer in Los Angeles
Looking to bring in a little bit of extra income and keep busy in his retirement, 76-year-old Leo Foley built a cozy, three-unit apartment house in San Pedro last year. It turned out just as he pictured it, the tan exterior complemented by "beautiful Kelly green" garage doors. The tenants had barely moved in when it happened. As if invited by the fresh paint, graffiti vandals struck in the night, scrawling indecipherable loops and slashes across Foley's new green doors. "It makes you mad!"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1990 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
Reacting to a storm of community protests, Mayor Tom Bradley pledged Wednesday to oppose any redevelopment plan in Watts that would displace homeowners. "The bottom line," Bradley said, "is if you live in Watts in a single-family residence, you don't need to fear losing your home. It won't happen. That is my commitment to you."
NEWS
July 16, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost a year ago I joined more than 400 middle-aged fellow alumni of Hermann Ridder Junior High School in the Bronx for a festive reunion. But we graduates did not meet at the school or even in the old neighborhood or even in the Bronx. Instead, the day of nostalgia was celebrated across the East River in Queens, almost nine miles away. The reason was obvious. Most of the alumni were too nervous to take even the most hesitant step into the remnants of our past. It is hard to blame them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1990 | JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Watts and West Adams are two strikingly different neighborhoods, separated in physical terms by a few miles of freeway, but in human terms by a yawning gap in family income, property values and upward mobility. Life is upbeat in West Adams, an attractive mid-cities district of red-tiled Spanish homes and neat lawns. White-collar blacks and whites have been busy gentrifying the area since the early 1980s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1989 | FRANK MESSINA
The City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to establish a local redevelopment agency, giving the city sweeping powers to turn blighted areas in this affluent community into urban renewal projects. "This is a first step on a long road," said John W. Donlevy Jr., the assistant city manager. "There will be a number of public hearings and discussions going out to the residents of Dana Point." The City Council itself will act as the redevelopment agency.
NEWS
April 26, 1989 | Roger Simon
It all started a few weeks ago when Jesse Jackson applied for a building permit to fix up his Washington home. He bought the home some years ago and has never lived in it. When he comes to Washington from his home in Chicago, which is often, he stays in hotels. If anybody else had applied for a building permit, people would have said: Hey, he's going to fix up the home so he can save a few bucks on hotel bills. But because it was Jesse Jackson, people said: Hey, he must be getting ready to run for mayor of Washington!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, Times Staff Writer
The night before the Allied invasion of Normandy, Milford Bliss parachuted behind enemy lines. After the war, he spent some time traveling around a Europe in ruins. Whole towns "just flattened," he recalled. "It changes your thinking." Last summer Bliss returned to see a continent rebuilt. Buildings that were 200 to 300 years old were repaired so they were as sturdy as ever.
NEWS
November 24, 1988 | MICHAEL REZENDES, The Washington Post
In Highland Park, a neighborhood once ravaged by arson and abandonment, Edward L. Cooper inspected rows of okra that he had planted and bent his long frame to pick the last of the season's peppers. "A lot of people say you can't do things in the ghetto," said Cooper, 84, president of Boston Urban Gardeners, an organization of inner-city tillers. "But we put our minds to it and built an oasis."
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | CRAIG QUINTANA, Times Staff Writer
The ramshackle house had a ceiling patched with cardboard, exposed wiring and faulty plumbing that overflowed toilet and sinks with sewage, but the owner rented the one-bedroom unit to three families with eight small children. Across town, a large apartment building not more than 800 feet from City Hall has an undersized dumpster that spills garbage into the alley. Dotting the blocks in between are perhaps a dozen empty lots overgrown with weeds and strewn with trash.
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