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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1995
Re "L.A. Does It Right With Redesign of Central Library," July 12: Add my voice to that of Robert Jones' in support of good public design. The Los Angeles Central Library is an excellent example. It is unconscionable to spend public money on facilities that are ugly and will not last. The public deserves good value for its scarce resources and good design doesn't have to cost a premium. Can anyone enter the Central Library and not feel proud? As a fourth-generation Angeleno, I even felt this way opening the doors to the pre-reconstruction library, with its murals and reliefs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Lisa Boone
The Los Angeles edition of the Architecture & Design Film Festival kicks off its five-day salute to art, architecture, design, fashion and urban planning Wednesday with showings of "If You Build It," "Design Is One: Massimo & Leila Vignelli" and "16 Acres. " The L.A. film festival, running through Sunday, will feature 30 recent feature-length and short films from around the world. "There is something for everyone who likes design at the festival," said the festival's founder and director, architect Kyle Bergman.
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REAL ESTATE
September 24, 1989 | SAM HALL KAPLAN
Although architecture is arguably the most permanent of the arts, the focus of the profession can be very ephemeral. Over the last decade, the focus has been on how buildings look and what sort of statement they make. But lately, there seems to be a healthy shift in the focus to a concern with how buildings function within particular settings, how people use buildings and how buildings affect the life around them.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2013 | By Lew Sichelman
A New York developer may be the first home builder to integrate wellness into its products. But if a major real estate education and research group has its way, healthful living will soon be incorporated in many of the places we live and work. The Urban Land Institute is embarking on a two-year effort to educate its members and the development community at large on how they can build healthful communities and workplaces where people can thrive. "We are looking at city building through the lens of health and wellness as a way to measure sustainability and long-term prosperity," said Lynn Thurber, chairman of the Washington nonprofit.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2003 | Nicolai Ouroussoff, Times Staff Writer
The radicals have gone mainstream. Or at least that seems to be the message behind this year's major architectural events. When the Frank Gehry-designed Guggenheim Museum opened in Bilbao, Spain, six years ago, the resulting clamor seemed to signal a new age for architecture. Gehry's building helped to push the field to the forefront of the public imagination. It confirmed that architects had become stars on a par with high-end fashion designers and NASCAR drivers.
MAGAZINE
December 13, 1992 | Aaron Betsky
The image is startling: A city of parkways, greenbelts, small-scale industry, lively boulevards and sheltered communities rising from the parched, post-riot landscape of Los Angeles. Fueled by immense social pressures and funded by investments that could total $200 billion within the next few decades, this new Los Angeles will emerge if a loosely knit group of local planners, designers, critics and politicians get their way. Working more or less independently, these L.A.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a winter's morning of bright sunshine, everything moves in the Piazza Venezia. And nothing does. The piazza is the heart of Rome. Histrionic yet cryptic, a metaphor for the Eternal City. Renaissance popes lived here. From a piazza balcony, Mussolini hectored crowds into a tragic fling with fascism. At the head of the piazza, 19th-Century Romans built a huge white marble wedding cake memorial to King Victor Emmanuel II, first ruler of a modern, united Italy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2003 | Karima A. Haynes, Times Staff Writer
In the decade since General Motors shuttered its automobile manufacturing plant in Panorama City, economic experts say the northeast San Fernando Valley community has struggled to regain its financial footing. The former GM facility was converted into The Plant, a $100-million shopping center, in 1998, but economic experts say the retail center has not kept pace with such nearby shopping malls as the Northridge Fashion Center and the Glendale Galleria.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1994 | THOMAS S. HINES, Thomas S. Hines is professor of history and architecture at UCLA. He has recently written a history of Wilshire Boulevard, "The Grand American Avenue" (1994)
In its provocative new exhibition, "Urban Revisions: Current Projects for the Urban Realm," the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art solidifies its role as the West Coast institution most committed to the importance of the art and craft of architecture and the built environment.
NEWS
June 18, 2001 | CAROLYN RAMSAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Listen as the city of West Hollywood's staff urban designer John Chase describes the effect of having graceful, willowy Chinese elms on either side of a sidewalk. "It's the symmetry of the double row of trees that's powerful. Two rows of trees create a better, fuller, more complete canopy than a single row does, so the space is contained overhead, as well as on either side." Chase personally fought for the double rows in the elaborate and long-awaited face lift of Santa Monica Boulevard.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard, This post has been updated as indicated below.
MIT has come up with an amazing computer interface that, as the video above shows, allows a user to move objects from afar. The inFORM 3-D surface, from MIT's Tangible Media Group, is something like a Pinscreen -- where pins set into a grid pop up to reveal a shape. Fast Company explains it as a surface that "three-dimensionally changes shape. " A user could even " hold hands with a person hundreds of miles away. " [Updated, 10:30 a.m. Nov. 11: Sean Follmer, with the Tangible group, told the Los Angeles Times on Wednesday that "shape-changing user interfaces" are on the cusp of becoming mainstream.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Talk about raining on your own parade. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority coaxed Renzo Piano from Paris, Ban van Berkel from Amsterdam and a bunch of talented local architects from the far Westside and brought them together Wednesday afternoon at Union Station. The occasion was the unveiling of six conceptual plans for Union Station and the surrounding neighborhood. Metro bought the historic landmark and an attached 40-acre parcel of land last year; it holds entitlements to build as much as 6 million square feet of new shops, offices and housing there, and it is running an international competition to find a master-planning team.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
"Any camp," the artist and architectural visionary Constant Nieuwenhuys once argued, "is a form, however primitive, of a city. " There were times when 2011 seemed to be unfolding as a test of that proposition. Thanks to the Occupy Wall Street protests that began in Zuccotti Park in New York and spread quickly to Los Angeles and other cities, rising frustration over income inequality began to take on an unmistakable architectural and urban form. Forget the blobs, boxes, starchitects and destination buildings that dominated much of the last decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2011 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Standing atop a patch of churned-up dirt on a recent morning, James Corner was surrounded by mismatched palm trees, chipped sidewalks and sagging chain link: a typical slice of Southern California landscape caught unawares, hardly ready for its close-up. He and I had just walked onto the site of a new pair of connected parks in Santa Monica that his New York-based landscape architecture and urban-design firm, James Corner Field Operations, is creating. Three towering ficus trees, sitting in giant temporary planter boxes and waiting to be relocated, added some scale, but otherwise the area was bare.
NATIONAL
December 13, 2010 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
As urban skylines go, few are more striking than Seattle's sharp, clean panorama of skyscrapers looming above the waterfront, the snowy peaks of the Cascade Mountains in the background. Starting next year, visitors may quickly become aware that the tall building near the center of the tableau is the corporate headquarters of Russell Investments ? a coup for the city's economic development team and a kick in the stomach to the legions of urban design aficionados who have long worked overtime to fashion Seattle as the gold standard for liberal urban cool.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2010 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times
John Chase, who as a writer and urban designer championed civic space and vernacular architecture in Southern California, finding poetry in stucco-clad apartment buildings, down-market modernism and overlooked corners of the urban realm, died Friday morning. He was 57. The cause was a heart attack, said Deborah Murphy, a longtime friend and former classmate at UCLA, where Chase earned a master's degree in architecture in 1980. As urban designer for the city of West Hollywood, a job he had held since 1996, Chase coaxed architects, developers, public agencies and other groups to carve out room in their projects for civic amenities, including park space, street furniture and shade-giving trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Talk about raining on your own parade. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority coaxed Renzo Piano from Paris, Ban van Berkel from Amsterdam and a bunch of talented local architects from the far Westside and brought them together Wednesday afternoon at Union Station. The occasion was the unveiling of six conceptual plans for Union Station and the surrounding neighborhood. Metro bought the historic landmark and an attached 40-acre parcel of land last year; it holds entitlements to build as much as 6 million square feet of new shops, offices and housing there, and it is running an international competition to find a master-planning team.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | DIRK SUTRO
It's time to give the cities back to the people. At Saturday's "Shaping the City" symposium in UC San Diego's Mandeville Auditorium, four internationally respected speakers hit relentlessly on the problems that those who shape cities--architects, urban designers, planners, developers, politicians--must solve if our planet, our country and Southern California are to be saved from self-destruction. The day served as a powerful warning that all is not well in U. S. cities.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE, ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
From the earliest stages of the design process, architects for a new Los Angeles Police Department headquarters downtown have been torn between two very different goals: giving the building a meaningful civic presence and keeping it safe from potential attack. Architects Paul Danna and Jose Palacios have been determined all along to make a case that the LAPD -- dramatically enlarged and haltingly reformed by its outgoing chief, William J. Bratton -- belongs literally and symbolically in the heart of the civic center.
WORLD
August 24, 2005 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
With limited exposure to the Middle East, Doug Suisman has drawn on his experience designing public spaces and transit systems for Los Angeles to help him with a daunting task: envisioning the new state of Palestine. In years past, the idea of an independent and economically viable Palestine seemed too far-fetched to contemplate.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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