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Urban Farm

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OPINION
June 15, 2006
Re "Lights, Camera, Eviction," editorial, June 14 It is true that some in Hollywood loaned their star power to the effort to save the South Central farm. But that is not the story. The story is one built on the idea of providing food at a neighborhood level, about community support in an inhospitable place. This was not a story cooked up by Hollywood; it was built by good people, and Hollywood was attracted to it. For The Times to just throw up its hands and say developer Ralph Horowitz "is entirely within his rights" is cold and cynical.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By Titania Kumeh
Karen Segura dug her hands deep into the soil of an onion patch at Bell Gardens Intermediate School as cars zipped past the nearly empty schoolyard. The 14-year-old was busy uprooting weeds in the school's edible garden, while around her five other students watered, tilled and pruned a lush assortment of fruits and vegetables. There were tomatoes, avocados, apples, pineapples, pumpkins, zucchinis, lavender, lettuce, Swiss chard and artichokes. Every public school in Bell Gardens has just such an urban farm run by members of the Environmental Garden Club, an after-school program that started at the intermediate school and now includes a rotating roster of 8- to 18-year-olds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
After a hot morning of work, David Kahn and his farmhands sat down to lunch at a long wooden table on the porch. Today's feast featured a salad of juicy heirloom tomatoes picked from vines just a few feet away, pasta and pesto made with homegrown cilantro, and a crusty loaf of wheat bread baked the day before in an outdoor clay oven. If there are any doubts about the viability of Edendale Farm ? which Kahn built, improbably, on a sloping half acre smack in the middle of a swanky Silver Lake neighborhood ?
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
Steven Wynbrandt sticks his hand deep beneath the layers of straw that blanket his enormous compost heap and pulls out a fistful of black gold, sweet and earthy. “Look at this soil,” Wynbrandt says with excitement as his fingers open, revealing his secret recipe for compost: decomposed dairy cow manure, alfalfa, yarrow, camomile, stinging nettle, oak bark, dandelion and valerian flowers. “I'm an alchemist.” PHOTOS: The Wynbrandt backyard As further proof that compost is to gardening these days what grass-fed beef and gluten-free gourmet foods are to the world of food, the Wynbrandt compost heap photographed by the Los Angeles Times would later sell through word of mouth for $1 a pound.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2006 | AL MARTINEZ
THERE was a forlorn quality to the embattled urban farm on the day I visited. Bulldozers had already begun plowing under areas within the 14-acre plot that had once been rich in the agriculture of the people. The sound of a flute drifted over the lost urban oasis like a woman's cry, adding to the melancholy nature of the scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2006 | AL MARTINEZ
IT'S just a big, empty lot now, filled with the savaged remains of what had once been an urban farm. Large piles of junk and garbage partially block the padlocked main entrance. Signs that once rallied a protest hang listlessly from a high metal fence. Five months ago, the 14-acre plot was a thriving garden of the people, filled with the crops that helped feed and support families in South-Central L.A. The garden disappeared under a court-mandated stamp of private property.
OPINION
May 12, 2011
Once there was a farm in South Los Angeles that sprouted among warehouses and railroad tracks. In the shadow of downtown skyscrapers, avocado trees and beans and tomatillos took root and gave 350 families a bountiful harvest and a gathering place. But the plot of land at 41st and Alameda — estimated at 14 acres — was not the farmers' to keep. Allowed to garden there by the city after it took possession under eminent domain, the land was eventually sold back to a previous owner. The farmers could leave — or buy the property from him for about $16 million.
FOOD
April 13, 2012 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Of the many Southern Californians starting urban farms these days, few have stories more colorful than Brett and Tanya Wyatt of B&T Farm . Brett, 53, was an observant Jew studying geography at UC Davis, then a Buddhist monk in Myanmar, where he managed to flee just before the regime raided his monastery. He then earned a doctorate analyzing organic farming concepts in Chiang Mai, Thailand, where he met Tanya, 44, who supervised a farm group and grew mushrooms. A year ago he returned to California to teach computer skills at a public high school in Watts, and they promptly decided to establish an urban farm.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2006 | AL MARTINEZ
I knew that the effort to save L.A.'s Southside urban farm was getting serious when Fred Starner wrote a folk song about it. The minute he heard that the farm was probably on the way to becoming history, he sat right down and banged out words to the tune of Woody Guthrie's "This Land." The lyrics don't sound right unless you're actually singing the music, but trust me when I say it's all there: poverty, tears, Jesus, greed and how "Horowitz don't like gardening on hands and knees."
BUSINESS
May 2, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Ignoring his aching back, Todd Lininger squatted down on his knees and inched his way around the vegetable field. The yields were up on three arugula plants. A snail crawled in the row of lettuce. And it looked like the onions might be ready for that night's dinner. All in all, not a bad harvest — considering that these crops were growing in a Lilliputian backyard plot in a Claremont cul-de-sac. Lininger calls himself a farmer, though he doesn't ride a John Deere and never sees a sun set over the fields.
NATIONAL
October 4, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
City planners, nutritionists and others have been pushing urban farming in recent years, but the movement appears to have taken a different twist in Chicago. Police there have seized about 1,500 plants worth as much as $10 million from an outdoor marijuana farm. The plants were growing on an area the size of two football fields near Bishop Ford Freeway on the city's far South Side. A police helicopter spotted the bright green plants from the air and, by Wednesday, authorities had confirmed the finding and taken control of the plants.
FOOD
April 13, 2012 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Of the many Southern Californians starting urban farms these days, few have stories more colorful than Brett and Tanya Wyatt of B&T Farm . Brett, 53, was an observant Jew studying geography at UC Davis, then a Buddhist monk in Myanmar, where he managed to flee just before the regime raided his monastery. He then earned a doctorate analyzing organic farming concepts in Chiang Mai, Thailand, where he met Tanya, 44, who supervised a farm group and grew mushrooms. A year ago he returned to California to teach computer skills at a public high school in Watts, and they promptly decided to establish an urban farm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2011 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
In a dense pocket of the Mission Terrace neighborhood, a quiet grid of streets near the city's southern edge, the afternoon fog rolls in over a rare sight: nearly an acre of land sandwiched between homes and planted with kale, exotic salad greens, bursts of flowers and fragrant herbs. The women who work this plot are pioneers. Their Little City Gardens recently became the first legal commercial farm within city borders. Thanks to them, San Francisco leaders revised zoning laws to allow the cultivation and sale of produce in all neighborhoods.
OPINION
May 29, 2011 | By Andrea Wulf
As America's gardeners dig, plant, weed and grow lettuce, beans and tomatoes in their vegetable plots this summer, they are part of a tradition that harks back to the beginnings of the United States. Just by working on a compost pile this weekend, you'll be in good historical company. The first four presidents of the United States — George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison — were all utterly obsessed with manure and recipes for compost. Adams even jumped into a stinking pile when he was America's first "minister plenipotentiary" to Britain in London in 1786.
OPINION
May 12, 2011
Once there was a farm in South Los Angeles that sprouted among warehouses and railroad tracks. In the shadow of downtown skyscrapers, avocado trees and beans and tomatillos took root and gave 350 families a bountiful harvest and a gathering place. But the plot of land at 41st and Alameda — estimated at 14 acres — was not the farmers' to keep. Allowed to garden there by the city after it took possession under eminent domain, the land was eventually sold back to a previous owner. The farmers could leave — or buy the property from him for about $16 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
After a hot morning of work, David Kahn and his farmhands sat down to lunch at a long wooden table on the porch. Today's feast featured a salad of juicy heirloom tomatoes picked from vines just a few feet away, pasta and pesto made with homegrown cilantro, and a crusty loaf of wheat bread baked the day before in an outdoor clay oven. If there are any doubts about the viability of Edendale Farm ? which Kahn built, improbably, on a sloping half acre smack in the middle of a swanky Silver Lake neighborhood ?
FOOD
May 6, 2009 | Mary MacVean
The front yard at Lexi Conrad and Joshua Mogin's house one recent Sunday morning felt like a Larchmont Village version of a barn raising. Before the party was over, much of the front lawn was gone. In its place were rows of tomatoes, eggplant, beans, squash and more -- 288 plants in all. Wooden stakes were pounded into the ground for a grape arbor to surround the garden. Volunteers shoveled and scattered compost, planted and carried.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
Steven Wynbrandt sticks his hand deep beneath the layers of straw that blanket his enormous compost heap and pulls out a fistful of black gold, sweet and earthy. “Look at this soil,” Wynbrandt says with excitement as his fingers open, revealing his secret recipe for compost: decomposed dairy cow manure, alfalfa, yarrow, camomile, stinging nettle, oak bark, dandelion and valerian flowers. “I'm an alchemist.” PHOTOS: The Wynbrandt backyard As further proof that compost is to gardening these days what grass-fed beef and gluten-free gourmet foods are to the world of food, the Wynbrandt compost heap photographed by the Los Angeles Times would later sell through word of mouth for $1 a pound.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2010 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
Ignoring his aching back, Todd Lininger squatted down on his knees and inched his way around the vegetable field. The yields were up on three arugula plants. A snail crawled in the row of lettuce. And it looked like the onions might be ready for that night's dinner. All in all, not a bad harvest — considering that these crops were growing in a Lilliputian backyard plot in a Claremont cul-de-sac. Lininger calls himself a farmer, though he doesn't ride a John Deere and never sees a sun set over the fields.
FOOD
May 6, 2009 | Mary MacVean
The front yard at Lexi Conrad and Joshua Mogin's house one recent Sunday morning felt like a Larchmont Village version of a barn raising. Before the party was over, much of the front lawn was gone. In its place were rows of tomatoes, eggplant, beans, squash and more -- 288 plants in all. Wooden stakes were pounded into the ground for a grape arbor to surround the garden. Volunteers shoveled and scattered compost, planted and carried.
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