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August 16, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
It's hot out there. Hotter than it would be if instead of what I see outside my sliver of window --  roads, buildings -- there was grass and vegetation. Hotter, too, than it would be if the buildings were all covered with white paint, a la a Greek island. This is the “heat island effect,” and it happens because the materials used to make roads and structures absorb a lot more heat from the sun than does vegetation.  They slowly release that heat through the night, keeping everything not-so-nicely cooking.
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OPINION
April 21, 2014 | By Daniel K. Gardner
Premier Li Keqiang wants to wean the Chinese economy off its dependence on export trade in cheap electronics, clothes, toys and tchotchkes of all variety. Let the Chinese people consume instead, he says, and let them consume products and services of high value. But how do you take a developing country like China, where saving has traditionally been favored over spending, and transform it into a nation of mass consumers? Simple, Li explains: You urbanize it, because city dwellers earn much more and spend much more.
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OPINION
May 9, 1999
William Fulton's analysis of intensifying urban growth pressures in Southern California (Opinion, May 2) sheds light on important challenges for our region. He correctly points to escalating citizen movements to preserve "quality of life" and resist massive and high-density urban encroachment. However, to speak of only "scraps" of land available for urbanization may be misleading on two scores. Acreages in Riverside and San Bernardino and northern L.A. counties are extensive and, over time, could grow into strong satellite metropolises if developed with dispersed airport and high-speed rail systems.
SCIENCE
February 12, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
In the debate over how to confront climate change, carbon dioxide gets most of the attention. But at the city level, new research suggests, we ought to be looking just as critically at how urban growth  is raising temperatures. A group of researchers found that as urban areas in the United States expand, so too will the “ heat island effect ,” in which pavement, rooftops, parking lots and other hard surfaces absorb heat and slowly release it, boosting temperatures higher than rural surroundings.
SCIENCE
February 12, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
In the debate over how to confront climate change, carbon dioxide gets most of the attention. But at the city level, new research suggests, we ought to be looking just as critically at how urban growth  is raising temperatures. A group of researchers found that as urban areas in the United States expand, so too will the “ heat island effect ,” in which pavement, rooftops, parking lots and other hard surfaces absorb heat and slowly release it, boosting temperatures higher than rural surroundings.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | JACK SMITH
My wife and I went down to San Diego recently for a weekend of culture. I would have thought there was enough culture in Los Angeles, but my wife belongs to an energetic group--the Committee of Professional Women for the Philharmonic--who seem to enjoy mixing the rigors of travel with the delights of opera, theater, and the dance. A year or two ago we went with the committee to Santa Fe, N. M., to see Mozart's "Cosi fan Tutte" and Wagner's "The Flying Dutchman" in that city's outdoor auditorium.
NEWS
October 14, 1997 | CHRIS CHI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After years of promoting new subdivisions and shopping malls, political leaders in Ventura County's biggest city are calling for strict new limits on development--and winning some uncommon praise from environmentalists. The apparent shift toward slower growth comes as local leaders are considering a number of major housing projects--all outside areas designated in city plans for growth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1990 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Equestrian Jeannine Roman recalls the day five horseback riders broke into a leisurely trot along Foothill Boulevard in Sylmar, headed toward a bountiful network of trails in the rolling slopes of the San Gabriel Mountains. A reminder of city life abruptly ended the ride. With lights flashing and siren blaring, a Los Angeles police car sped by. Horses spooked and scattered. Some bucked their riders. One animal jumped onto the hood of a parked car.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1997 | CHRIS CHI
With a crucial meeting on Oxnard's future development policy coming up, Councilman Tom Holden is calling for officials to adopt strict growth limits to protect farmland and beaches. Holden has voiced support for "urban growth boundaries," a planning tool he said would make it more difficult for Oxnard to annex and develop land outside city limits. In a recent report, city planning officials described the urban growth boundaries as a "mapped line dividing land to be developed from . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1988
This letter is in response to a commentary written by Joseph Bookstein ("Stress, Health Factors Are Part of Growth Control Issue," May 22). Mr. Bookstein discusses some medical aspects associated with "uncontrolled urban growth." The biggest problem, as stated in his commentary, is stress, which in turn leads to serious physical health problems. I will admit that the prospect of periodic gunfire on our nation's freeways does not entice me to travel often. However, unless I never want to visit my elderly mother again, I shall continue to drive the freeways.
SCIENCE
August 16, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
It's hot out there. Hotter than it would be if instead of what I see outside my sliver of window --  roads, buildings -- there was grass and vegetation. Hotter, too, than it would be if the buildings were all covered with white paint, a la a Greek island. This is the “heat island effect,” and it happens because the materials used to make roads and structures absorb a lot more heat from the sun than does vegetation.  They slowly release that heat through the night, keeping everything not-so-nicely cooking.
OPINION
December 17, 2006
Re "Mega-projects could reshape L.A. growth," Dec. 13 The article contrasts today's "smart growth" with what came before: "In the 1960s and '70s, for example, city planners created a second downtown in Century City, but they did so far from any freeways or mass transit, a legacy that Westside commuters deal with daily." However, Century City was intended to be smart growth. From a 1972 Times article: "When the Planning Commission approved the master plan of Welton Becket Associates for the vast development of Century City, it was agreed that both a Beverly Hills freeway and a rapid transit line would be needed to make the center possible."
NATIONAL
June 5, 2003 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
A three-year, $5.5-million study of America's ocean waters, conducted by a panel of politicians, scientists and fishermen, calls for the creation of a new federal agency to control overfishing, pollution and urban encroachment. The study by the Pew Oceans Commission details a developing crisis in U.S.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2002 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
IRONWOOD FOREST NATIONAL MONUMENT, Ariz.--Darrell Tersey bumps the four-wheel drive along a desert wash, steers up the bank and comes to a dusty stop. The Bureau of Land Management agent steps out onto what appears to be a dry lake bed. No living thing can be spotted within a 20-acre circle. The ground sparkles under the harsh sun. Closer inspection reveals it is carpeted with shattered beer bottles and spent shell casings.
NEWS
May 19, 2002 | WILLIAM McCALL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
One of the first major metropolitan areas in the nation to throw up an imaginary fence around the suburbs to rein in sprawl is deciding whether to loosen the restrictions. An "urban growth boundary" that has preserved forests and farmland on the doorsteps of Oregon's largest city has made Portland a national model for controlling sprawl. Metro, an elected regional agency created in 1979, decides when and where the line can be extended, based on population growth within the imaginary fence.
OPINION
May 9, 1999
William Fulton's analysis of intensifying urban growth pressures in Southern California (Opinion, May 2) sheds light on important challenges for our region. He correctly points to escalating citizen movements to preserve "quality of life" and resist massive and high-density urban encroachment. However, to speak of only "scraps" of land available for urbanization may be misleading on two scores. Acreages in Riverside and San Bernardino and northern L.A. counties are extensive and, over time, could grow into strong satellite metropolises if developed with dispersed airport and high-speed rail systems.
OPINION
December 17, 2006
Re "Mega-projects could reshape L.A. growth," Dec. 13 The article contrasts today's "smart growth" with what came before: "In the 1960s and '70s, for example, city planners created a second downtown in Century City, but they did so far from any freeways or mass transit, a legacy that Westside commuters deal with daily." However, Century City was intended to be smart growth. From a 1972 Times article: "When the Planning Commission approved the master plan of Welton Becket Associates for the vast development of Century City, it was agreed that both a Beverly Hills freeway and a rapid transit line would be needed to make the center possible."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1997 | CHRIS CHI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ventura County's largest city has taken a big step toward preserving farmland with a majority of City Council members expressing interest in a slow-growth tool known as urban growth boundaries. Dozens of residents at a special meeting Wednesday night--alarmed by the city's plans to add nearly 4,000 homes and annex 1,100 acres of farmland--urged City Council members and planning commissioners to make development of agricultural land more difficult.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1998 | RON BOTTORFF, Ron Bottorff of Newbury Park was a member of the Ventura County Agriculture Policy Working Group and recently completed a term as the public member of the Local Agency Formation Commission
Campaign fliers are arriving almost daily supporting or opposing Measure B, the county Save Open Space and Agricultural Resources initiative, and the various city SOARs. Numerous letters and articles have been printed about them. There has been considerably less public discussion, however, of Measure B's companion on Tuesday's ballot, Measure A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1998 | FRANK SCHILLO, Frank Schillo represents the 2nd District on the Ventura County Board of Supervisors
Nearly 1,000 acres of prime farmland in Ventura County gives way to the bulldozer each year for tract homes and malls. Once the land is paved over, it's gone forever--there's no turning back. Next month, voters will let us know how they feel about keeping our greenbelts and open spaces intact and our prime farmland away from development.
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