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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1993 | STEPHANIE SIMON
Developers, lawyers and environmental consultants can learn about the latest developments in urban planning laws during an annual update scheduled for Thursday afternoon at Thousand Oaks City Hall. The California chapter of the American Planning Assn. is sponsoring the meeting, which will run from 1:30 to 5 p.m. It is open to anyone who is interested in growth in Ventura, Santa Barbara or San Luis Obispo counties.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Jon Christensen
When people say that Los Angeles is hard to read, as they often do, they're usually not talking about books. They're talking about the city itself or rather the megalopolis, made up of dozens of cities. It is this sprawling, tangled, confusing, seemingly homogenous but in fact diverse, mixed-up urban and suburban landscape that people describe as illegible. Edward Soja, a geographer at UCLA, has spent much of his long career trying to read Los Angeles. Along the way, he developed innovative and sometimes controversial theories of urbanization and became a founder of a dynamic "L.A.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Most urban renewal projects require piles of cash and armloads of permits and blueprints. All that's needed for James Rojas' makeover of downtown Long Beach is imagination. Rojas is an urban planner who has constructed an 80-square-foot scale model of the city that residents and business owners can tinker with to illustrate their own vision of Long Beach's future. The city's high-rises, retail shops and residential buildings are represented by movable blocks of wood, scraps of plastic and pieces of castoffs that Rojas has salvaged from garage sales and thrift shops.
SCIENCE
February 12, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
In the debate over how to confront climate change, carbon dioxide gets most of the attention. But at the city level, new research suggests, we ought to be looking just as critically at how urban growth  is raising temperatures. A group of researchers found that as urban areas in the United States expand, so too will the “ heat island effect ,” in which pavement, rooftops, parking lots and other hard surfaces absorb heat and slowly release it, boosting temperatures higher than rural surroundings.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2000 | From A Times Staff Writer
A team of students from the Anderson School at UCLA beat out rivals from USC in an urban planning competition sponsored by the Southern California chapter of the National Assn. of Industrial and Office Properties. Judges named the five-member UCLA team the winner after reviewing its response to the question: "What type of private commercial development of the 11.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Francis Violich, 94, a professor of landscape architecture at UC Berkeley who wrote three notable books on urban planning, died Aug. 21 of natural causes at his home in Berkeley, the university announced. Born in San Francisco in 1911, Violich grew up in a home a few hundred feet south of Golden Gate Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2008 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Melville C. Branch, an educator, author and urban planner who taught at USC for many years and served on the Los Angeles Planning Commission through the 1960s, died Feb. 11. He was 94. Branch died of complications from heart disease at his home in Pacific Palisades, his wife, Dr. Hilda Rollman-Branch, said. A pioneer in his field, Branch was the first graduate student to earn a doctoral degree in regional planning at Harvard University, in 1949.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it Irvine by the Euphrates. Its actual name is Titris Hoyuk, it is in Turkey, not California, and it is more than 4,000 years old. But this city of 10,000 souls bears more than a passing resemblance to Irvine and Long Island's even more famous Levittown. Like those two cities, Titris is a planned community whose founders sat down and drew up detailed blueprints before the first shovel of dirt was turned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2003 | Errin Haines, Times Staff Writer
Most people would never ask themselves, "What would be the better neighbor for a homeless shelter: The Gap or an apartment complex?" But that was one of the many debates among a group of students in Chris Monaster's urban-planning class at Reseda High School last semester. The school was one of four in the Los Angeles Unified School District to participate in a new partnership with the Urban Land Institute, Los Angeles, a nonprofit education and research institute focusing on urban planning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2007 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Inspiration was flowing like the Verdugo Wash after a five-day rainstorm for Alex Dann. "Where's the zoo?" he asked, sizing up the table-size tableau in front of him. "Over there? Cool." The 7-year-old Tarzana boy was at a downtown Los Angeles art gallery Saturday, poring over an exhibit called "Five Models Afloat." A moment later, he was participating in it.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2012 | By Richard Wronski
The last time a streetcar rattled along the rails in Milwaukee, in 1958, the Braves played at County Stadium and Pabst, Schlitz and Miller were the brewers that made the city famous. Today the Brewers play at Miller Park and the Braves are long gone, but streetcars may be making a comeback. Mayor Tom Barrett is the prime mover behind Milwaukee's plan to build a brand-new streetcar system. Bright, modern vehicles would traverse a two-mile route through the city's east side, downtown and historic Third Ward, a former warehouse area now popular for its shops and restaurants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Most urban renewal projects require piles of cash and armloads of permits and blueprints. All that's needed for James Rojas' makeover of downtown Long Beach is imagination. Rojas is an urban planner who has constructed an 80-square-foot scale model of the city that residents and business owners can tinker with to illustrate their own vision of Long Beach's future. The city's high-rises, retail shops and residential buildings are represented by movable blocks of wood, scraps of plastic and pieces of castoffs that Rojas has salvaged from garage sales and thrift shops.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
John Davies, a major civic figure in San Diego for decades, particularly in education, urban planning and the revitalization of a once-crumbling downtown, died of pancreatic cancer Friday at his home in downtown San Diego. He was 76. Along with his civic involvement in San Diego, Davies was a member and then chairman of the University of California Board of Regents and also a trustee of the UC San Diego Foundation. Davies was a confidant and political ally of Pete Wilson during the latter's tenure as mayor, U.S. senator and California governor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
A UCLA alumnus who earned a fortune in the animal feed business is donating $100 million to the Westwood campus for its school of public affairs and the controversial construction of an on-campus hotel and conference center, officials plan to announce Wednesday. The gift from Meyer Luskin and his wife, Renee, is the second largest ever to UCLA. It is topped only by entertainment industry mogul David Geffen's $200-million donation to UCLA's medical school in 2002. Half of the Luskin donation will go to UCLA's School of Public Affairs, where it will support graduate student financial aid, and teaching and research in such fields as public policy, urban planning and social welfare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2010 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times
John Chase, who as a writer and urban designer championed civic space and vernacular architecture in Southern California, finding poetry in stucco-clad apartment buildings, down-market modernism and overlooked corners of the urban realm, died Friday morning. He was 57. The cause was a heart attack, said Deborah Murphy, a longtime friend and former classmate at UCLA, where Chase earned a master's degree in architecture in 1980. As urban designer for the city of West Hollywood, a job he had held since 1996, Chase coaxed architects, developers, public agencies and other groups to carve out room in their projects for civic amenities, including park space, street furniture and shade-giving trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2008 | Mike Boehm
Having been the driving force in planting Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown L.A., Walt Disney's kin are moving to open a 77,000-square-foot museum and office complex in renovated old military buildings in the Presidio in San Francisco. A fall 2009 opening is scheduled for the Walt Disney Family Museum, where exhibits will tell the story of Walt Disney and his effect on American childhood, urban planning and the film industry. Supervising preparations will be Richard Benefield, who was announced Thursday as executive director.
NEWS
May 12, 1994 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorney Tom Doniger hadn't even started unpacking after moving into his house in Windsor Square when a neighbor knocked on the door and gave him a list with the name and address of every resident on the block. "I've lived in lots of other places and I've never known my neighbors before," he says. Recently Doniger has come to a new appreciation of the neighborhood where he has lived for six years. "We look out for each other," he says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2008 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Melville C. Branch, an educator, author and urban planner who taught at USC for many years and served on the Los Angeles Planning Commission through the 1960s, died Feb. 11. He was 94. Branch died of complications from heart disease at his home in Pacific Palisades, his wife, Dr. Hilda Rollman-Branch, said. A pioneer in his field, Branch was the first graduate student to earn a doctoral degree in regional planning at Harvard University, in 1949.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2007 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Inspiration was flowing like the Verdugo Wash after a five-day rainstorm for Alex Dann. "Where's the zoo?" he asked, sizing up the table-size tableau in front of him. "Over there? Cool." The 7-year-old Tarzana boy was at a downtown Los Angeles art gallery Saturday, poring over an exhibit called "Five Models Afloat." A moment later, he was participating in it.
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