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Urban Sprawl

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2000
Re "Santa Monicas Searching for Balance," Aug. 20. The article tells of 3,700 housing units being [allowed] on mountainous properties along the Ventura Freeway corridor, including the cities of Hidden Hills, Agoura and Calabasas, all in Los Angeles County. I'm alarmed at the continuing loss of open space. This is urban sprawl! When you move, choose a house or an apartment where you can walk, bike or take mass transportation to most destinations. Stop spending so much time driving.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 21, 2014 | By Daniel K. Gardner
Premier Li Keqiang wants to wean the Chinese economy off its dependence on export trade in cheap electronics, clothes, toys and tchotchkes of all variety. Let the Chinese people consume instead, he says, and let them consume products and services of high value. But how do you take a developing country like China, where saving has traditionally been favored over spending, and transform it into a nation of mass consumers? Simple, Li explains: You urbanize it, because city dwellers earn much more and spend much more.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1996
Ventura County's Santa Clara River Valley is Southern California's last largely undeveloped river corridor. For most of its length, the Santa Clara River flows through natural and agricultural landscapes, including some of the region's best remaining river woodlands. Newhall Land & Farming Co. is about to change all this with its proposal for a new city of 70,000 people, larger than Camarillo, on five miles of Ventura County's border. Residents of Ventura County must either respond to this challenge or face losing this unique and beautiful valley to sprawling urban development.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2013 | By Simon Rabinovitch
The urbanization of China lends itself to jaw-dropping numbers. In the last 30 years, 500 million people have moved to the nation's cities — as many as the combined populations of the U.S., Britain, France and Italy. Another 300 million are projected to exchange their plows for urban life by 2030, at which point 1 in every 8 people on Earth will live in a Chinese city. Pictures of towering skylines in cities that few outsiders have heard of — from Anshan to Zhengzhou — suggest that China's urban future will not just be big. It will also be a model of sleek modern efficiency.
NEWS
October 27, 1985
The article "Bold Coyotes Stalk Urban Communities" (Times, Aug. 22) presented a one-sided view of this polemical subject, while many pertinent facts have been ignored. It stated that the "animals are becoming urban dwellers." The fact is that coyotes have been roaming the hills of Southern California since the Pleistocene and the humans, who have built their homes on the coyote's former habitat, are the intruders. Charles Ryder said in the article that "People like us, urban dwellers, aren't used to the idea of wild animals eating our pets."
BUSINESS
October 5, 2008 | Diane Wedner, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Tuesday signed a landmark bill that will for the first time allow the state to use its transportation funds to reward plans that provide for housing near job centers and transit corridors and that slow the advance of urban sprawl. The measure was backed, after a great deal of negotiating, by home builders, local governments and environmentalists. SB 375, written by Sen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2002 | HOLLY MYERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Vacant: Recent Landscapes of Los Angeles," a small but articulate exhibition of photographs curated by Chris Balaschak, is aptly titled. If any one theme dominates these and most photographs of our cityscape, it must be the nagging sense of vacancy that is generally thought to imbue it.
NEWS
December 24, 1988 | GEORGE FRANK, Times Staff Writer
Marine Lt. Col. William J. Fox was still angry about the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor as he flew over the wide open farmlands of Orange County. It was 1942 and Fox was searching for "just the right place" for a mainland airfield where Marine Corps aviators could be trained for the campaign to regain the Pacific. As he swept over a tiny railroad whistle-stop called El Toro, Fox spotted a sprawling plot of land covered with bean fields and orange groves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1986 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
By any measure, it's a desolate stretch of land. All along the northern reaches of Interstate 15, the signs of civilization are few. Dry, rolling hills studded with boulders line the freeway from Escondido 19 miles north to the county line. But with development stampeding across North County, planners say there is little chance this rugged strip of unincorporated territory will be ignored much longer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2002 | Scott Gold and Massie Ritsch, Times Staff Writers
The Inland Empire, overwhelmed by unchecked growth and plagued by helter-skelter development, is by far the nation's worst example of urban sprawl, a team of researchers said Thursday. For 20 years, the price of homes closer to the coast has skyrocketed, forcing hundreds of thousands of families to search inland for affordable housing. Many landed -- in Riverside or San Bernardino, Corona or Ontario -- with the hope that they had left behind the ills of urban life.
OPINION
October 7, 2012
Re "The bankruptcy-sprawl connection," Opinion, Oct. 1 There is probably some merit to the municipal costs associated with urban sprawl that William Fulton suggests. Intuitively, I understand his arguments. However, the article is really only a hypothesis. Fulton's assertion would have been much more powerful if he had included references to academic studies to support his position. As a senior fellow at the Price School of Public Policy at USC, Fulton should know better.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
The Toronto International Film Festival is a showcase for Oscar hopefuls and refined art-house movies destined to win critical acclaim. But there's another side to the event -- one that comes out at the stroke of midnight. To kick off the screening of Lionsgate's new 3-D futuristic action movie "Dredd," the film's star Karl Urban strode to the front of the Ryerson Theatre, held a microphone close to his mouth and in his character's deep rumble intoned, “It's judgment time,” followed by a profane epithet that cannot be mentioned for fear of offending more sensitive readers.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Nika Soon-Shiong, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details
Maneuvering a 4,000-pound machine made of aluminum and steel at highway speeds leaves little room for human error and more than enough room for the possibility of danger. So perhaps it should come as little surprise that motor vehicle crashes remained a leading cause of death in the United States in 2009. According to a new report, they accounted for 34,485 deaths. The new data, released by the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found that urban areas like Los Angeles and New York had lower death rates due to car crashes than rural areas.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2011 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Architect Stefanos Polyzoides is a godfather of the hugely influential movement in architecture and urban planning known as the New Urbanism. All those suburbs that decided to put in little downtowns and walkable areas? The whole loft thing? Infill development that puts condos in empty lots instead of sprawl out in the exurbs? Credit Polyzoides, his wife, Elizabeth Moule, and a small group of colleagues for co-founding the influential movement ? and Polyzoides for giving it a name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2009 | Jessica Garrison
As the horse named Sombrero strained up a hill above Hansen Dam, Mary Benson leaned forward over his neck and surveyed the stunning landscape of sun-dappled oaks and trickling mountain streams. But the view broke her heart: A subdivision where horse trails used to be. Condos and houses that used to have stables behind them. One sign after another of the disappearing horse culture in her neighborhood. "We are losing an irreplaceable piece of the American culture . . .
BUSINESS
October 5, 2008 | Diane Wedner, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Tuesday signed a landmark bill that will for the first time allow the state to use its transportation funds to reward plans that provide for housing near job centers and transit corridors and that slow the advance of urban sprawl. The measure was backed, after a great deal of negotiating, by home builders, local governments and environmentalists. SB 375, written by Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1999 | ANNA GORMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After months of campaigning, petitioning and canvassing to limit growth in Ventura County, hundreds of SOAR supporters gathered Sunday afternoon in Camarillo to celebrate their victory. Holding posters worn at the corners, they hugged one another like long-lost friends, toasted their success and speculated about the future of the Save Open Space and Agricultural Resources movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2008 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
Will Californians drive less to reduce global warming? Maybe not on our own -- but state officials are ready to nudge us. The Legislature is on the verge of adopting the nation's first law to control planet-warming gases by curbing sprawl. The bill, sponsored by incoming state Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento), is expected to pass the Assembly today and the Senate on Friday. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has not taken a position on the bill, but sponsors expect him to sign it once the state passes a budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2008 | David Zahniser, Times Staff Writer
A divided Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to halt its review of the 5,553-home Las Lomas project, dealing what could well be a fatal blow to the mega-development planned for north Los Angeles County. "This project would have put 15,000 cars a day in an already heavily impacted area," said City Councilman Greig Smith, who represents the northwest San Fernando Valley. "The people of L.A. said we can't take that anymore. We're tired of it."
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