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Urban Warfare

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OPINION
December 13, 1992
The radio reporter was talking about young hoodlums in control of the city and "guns, guns, guns everywhere." I wondered which American metropolis he was talking about--the idiot that I am--but he was describing Mogadishu, Somalia. Imagine that! AVIK GILBOA, Hollywood
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2011 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
Actor, and now director, Ralph Fiennes has given us war and politics on a grand operatic scale in his ambitious and at times thrilling rendering of one of Shakespeare's lesser known works -- "Coriolanus. " For his first foray behind the camera, Fiennes has started off right by surrounding himself with a superlative cast including Vanessa Redgrave, Gerard Butler, Jessica Chastain and an exceptional Brian Cox. He has taken the title role for himself, Caius Martius Coriolanus, in the story of a war hero wading into the political arena only to be undone by his hubris.
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NEWS
July 14, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER. Johannesburg bureau chief Scott Kraft was recently on assignment in Mogadishu, Somalia
The United Nations' experiment in peace "enforcement" in Somalia has been badly shaken by the fruitless three-week hunt for warlord Mohammed Farah Aidid, the escalation of urban warfare and the deaths of 35 U.N. troops and four foreign journalists. With each passing day, the stature of the fugitive Aidid in the eyes of many Somalis is growing--and the U.N.'s reputation is falling. Somalis like a winner, and to many it seems that Aidid is winning.
OPINION
October 31, 2011 | By Robert D. Blackwill and Walter B. Slocombe
American leaders have traditionally explained the foundations of the U.S.-Israel relationship by citing shared democratic values and the moral responsibility America bears to protect the small nation-state of the Jewish people. Although accurate and essential, this characterization is incomplete because it fails to capture a third, crucial aspect: the many ways in which Israel advances U.S. national interests. Today, Israeli contributions to U.S. national interests cover a broad spectrum.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein told his military command Tuesday that U.S. and allied forces intend to attack "in the coming few days." Convening a war council of senior military and government officials for the second time in 24 hours, Hussein said he expects a combined assault on occupied Kuwait, which Iraqi troops invaded almost three months ago.
OPINION
October 31, 2011 | By Robert D. Blackwill and Walter B. Slocombe
American leaders have traditionally explained the foundations of the U.S.-Israel relationship by citing shared democratic values and the moral responsibility America bears to protect the small nation-state of the Jewish people. Although accurate and essential, this characterization is incomplete because it fails to capture a third, crucial aspect: the many ways in which Israel advances U.S. national interests. Today, Israeli contributions to U.S. national interests cover a broad spectrum.
NEWS
March 30, 2003 | Gal Luft, Gal Luft, co-director of the Institute for the Analysis of Global Security, is a former Israeli battalion commander in Jenin.
Urban warfare, as ancient Chinese philosopher Sun Tzu concluded, is the lowest form of warfare. The kind of fighting that coalition forces are likely to face in Baghdad involves complicated command-and-control challenges and presents soldiers and commanders with unparalleled tactical and ethical dilemmas. One such challenge is the Iraqis' use of children as urban guerrilla fighters.
MAGAZINE
May 9, 1993 | Wanda Coleman
Yes, L.A. remains a city in crisis. Many Angelenos still suffer post-traumatic stress syndrome directly traceable to the events of April 1992. The evidence appears daily in headlines, on TV and radio broadcasts, in reports of economic unrest and sporadic violence. Plus, there are the pressures of electing a new mayor. Who will best serve El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora la Reina de Los Angeles de Porciuncula? Who will be our Great Multicultural Hope?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1990 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Don't let the title fool you. Keith Reddin's "Life During Wartime," which opened Sunday at the La Jolla Playhouse's Warren Theatre, is not about war in the traditional sense. It is about subdivisions of the word: urban warfare, the war within us and--mostly--political warfare as in sexual and office politics. Combat zones all. Outwardly, this unusual play is a richly comical examination of some of the territory covered by David Mamet in "Glengarry Glen Ross."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2011 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
Actor, and now director, Ralph Fiennes has given us war and politics on a grand operatic scale in his ambitious and at times thrilling rendering of one of Shakespeare's lesser known works -- "Coriolanus. " For his first foray behind the camera, Fiennes has started off right by surrounding himself with a superlative cast including Vanessa Redgrave, Gerard Butler, Jessica Chastain and an exceptional Brian Cox. He has taken the title role for himself, Caius Martius Coriolanus, in the story of a war hero wading into the political arena only to be undone by his hubris.
WORLD
January 12, 2010 | By Mark Magnier
In most places, newspaper headlines about a cease-fire between rival political parties tend to be about policy squabbles. In Karachi, such references are more often literal. More than 40 people have died here in the last five days in so-called targeted killings, most of the victims slain because of their political affiliations. Some were executed with shocking brutality -- three of the bodies found Sunday had been decapitated. "Think of Chicago or New York a century ago," said Ikram Sehgal, a political analyst and longtime Karachi resident.
WORLD
January 30, 2005 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
It's long after midnight when paratroopers from Alpha Company enter the house and start moving room to room. In the kitchen, decorated with plastic flowers and lace curtains, they ransack drawers and cupboards. In the bedroom, they find a small bottle of I Love New York eau de toilette standing half-empty, as if recently used. But the food in the fridge has spoiled. The soldiers' target is long gone. "Let me think of something creative," Capt. J.T.
WORLD
December 2, 2004 | Patrick J. McDonnell and John Hendren, Times Staff Writers
Seventy-one U.S. troops died in the November battle to retake the city of Fallouja, according to the top Marine commander in Iraq, a toll significantly higher than the previous count of 51 deaths. An additional 623 American troops were wounded, said Marine Lt. Gen. John F. Sattler, up from an injury count of 425 issued more than two weeks ago. The Fallouja offensive made November one of the two most deadly months for American military personnel since the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in March 2003.
WORLD
April 29, 2004 | John Hendren and Tony Perry, Times Staff Writers
The plans have been laid, the troops are positioned, and all is ready for a massive Marine assault on Fallouja -- and with it the long-dreaded prospect of major urban warfare in Iraq. "We got the last unit in place today. We're tightening the noose," Col.
NEWS
April 4, 2003 | Randy Gangle, Retired Marine Col. Randy Gangle is executive director of the Center for Emerging Threats and Opportunities.
As coalition forces tighten the grip around Baghdad, horror stories about house-to-house combat and American troops' preparedness to fight an urban war are already being told. Certainly, the nature of the urban environment exacerbates the inherent danger and friction that are the essence of combat. Large cities combine various forms of structures, terrain and road networks into a chaotic environment.
NEWS
March 30, 2003 | Gal Luft, Gal Luft, co-director of the Institute for the Analysis of Global Security, is a former Israeli battalion commander in Jenin.
Urban warfare, as ancient Chinese philosopher Sun Tzu concluded, is the lowest form of warfare. The kind of fighting that coalition forces are likely to face in Baghdad involves complicated command-and-control challenges and presents soldiers and commanders with unparalleled tactical and ethical dilemmas. One such challenge is the Iraqis' use of children as urban guerrilla fighters.
WORLD
January 12, 2010 | By Mark Magnier
In most places, newspaper headlines about a cease-fire between rival political parties tend to be about policy squabbles. In Karachi, such references are more often literal. More than 40 people have died here in the last five days in so-called targeted killings, most of the victims slain because of their political affiliations. Some were executed with shocking brutality -- three of the bodies found Sunday had been decapitated. "Think of Chicago or New York a century ago," said Ikram Sehgal, a political analyst and longtime Karachi resident.
WORLD
August 8, 2002 | GREG MILLER and JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein has told regional government officials that he aims to thwart any U.S. invasion by avoiding open desert fighting and massing his military in major cities where civilian and American casualties would be highest, current and former U.S. intelligence officials say. In meetings in recent weeks, the U.S. officials say, Hussein has outlined a strategy that appears to center on drawing U.S.
NEWS
July 8, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This starkly painted, vaguely European-style village seems bucolic in the heat of the morning sun. But to the approaching Marines in Capt. Mark Sumner's Echo Company, it is fraught with potential danger--and visions of what may lie ahead in Bosnia. Hidden behind windows and on rooftops, camouflaged guerrillas open up with rifle and machine-gun fire, zapping a couple of Echo Company Marines before they can take cover in a deserted side street.
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