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NEWS
September 2, 1994 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's urban water agencies provided a significant breakthrough in the long battle over the fragile Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta on Thursday by agreeing to environmental protections for a brackish bay that serves as a nursery for endangered species.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2009 | Bettina Boxall
The chances that Sacramento will break the stalemate on California water policy this summer grew dimmer Tuesday when Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said he would not sign legislation that didn't include bonds for new reservoirs and dams. The declaration signaled Schwarzenegger's dissatisfaction with a package of water bills Democrats are hoping to move through the Legislature before the mid-September adjournment. "I will not sign anything that does not have above-the-ground, below-the-ground water storage," the governor said at a news conference on the steps of the Capitol in Sacramento.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1990
California farmers are among the most efficient users of water in the country, despite accusations by The Times and others. Two recent independent studies each showed that overall Central Valley agriculture is 99% efficient in its use of water. An acre of homes consumes about the same amount of water as the average acre of farmland. And farmers are not the end users of this water. It takes over 1.5 million gallons of water to grow the food for one person for one year. Comparing agricultural and urban water costs is misleading.
OPINION
May 26, 2007 | Bill Stall, BILL STALL is a contributing editor to the Opinion page.
DELTA AND DAWN, the wayward humpback whales stranded near Rio Vista, have taught thousands about the location of the California Delta, where the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers meet and flow toward San Francisco Bay. It's about time: An estimated 23 million of us receive some or most of our water from the delta. And the delta is in trouble. Has been for at least 30 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1991
Even before the state's current drought, it was clear that the easy sources of additional water to support growth were tapped out. With that came an awareness that conserving may be the best way to find "new" sources of water. Now the state's urban water agencies, which have a long history of infighting, are joining in a pioneering conservation pact aimed at saving enough water to meet the needs of several million people a year. The plan marks a new era of water politics in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1994
As the author Marc Reisner once observed, water in the American West runs uphill--toward money. Nothing quite so defines and controls the economic life and destiny of California as the massive man-made plumbing that draws water down from the north, lifts it over the Tehachapi Mountains and turns arid Southern California into one of the world's great metropolises. But this has come at a high price, in more than just dollars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1989
I have come to eagerly anticipate the fine coverage that Donella H. Meadows, adjunct professor of environmental and policy studies at Dartmouth College, gives such critical environmental issues as the greenhouse effect, hazardous waste and, most recently, the problems that excessive production of plastics and our throw-away habits cause the environment ("Wasting the World With a Plague of Plastic Debris," Opinion, June 4). Her emphasis on the necessity of source reduction, reuse and recycling of plastic materials will be stressed in one section of an exciting and important exhibit on urban environmental problems at the California State Museum of Science and Industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1998
Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt and Gov. Pete Wilson have taken an important step in putting their political muscle behind efforts to fix the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the heart of California's vast water delivery system.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
Urban water providers in Southern California are pitching a precedent-setting water plan to their neighbors in the agricultural San Joaquin Valley to meet demands of a booming population. The Metropolitan Water District, which serves portions of six of the heavily populated southern counties, is proposing a water exchange to make up for a shortfall estimated at 1 million acre-feet a year by 2010. The program, pending state and federal approval, would operate something like a bank account.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1998
Two big bond measures proposed by Gov. Pete Wilson when he sent his 1998-99 budget to the Legislature in January are undergoing significant changes in the Capitol. One is for the good, involving urban parks, and one bodes ill for solving California's water problems. The good news involves Wilson's proposed $800-million resources bond issue for state park development and maintenance, watershed protection, wetlands restoration and other resources programs.
OPINION
May 21, 2007
Re "Drought, the sequel, is here," Opinion, May 17 One only has to travel out of the urban basin to notice we're in a drought (the "D" word). There's no snow where there should be, trees are brown, farmers' pumps are sucking mud. But don't ask the power elite downtown and in Sacramento about the "D" word because that would mean something would have to change. Homes couldn't continue to flood irrigate using sprinklers like 1970, when there were 15 million fewer people here. Without that flood irrigation, homes would stop polluting the ocean with runoff and our sewer systems wouldn't keep busting at the seams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2006 | Gary Polakovic, Times Staff Writer
Santa Clarita Valley water agencies can't deliver enough water for the rapidly growing northern frontier of Los Angeles County and increased demand will only reduce stream flows along the 100-mile Santa Clara River, a coalition of environmental groups charge in a lawsuit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2005 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration plans this month to begin signing contracts that will position Central Valley farmers to reap substantial profits for decades by selling water to the state's expanding metropolitan areas. The more than 200 contracts -- governing most of the water from the massive federal Central Valley Project -- will give the valley's agribusiness interests control over the single largest allotment of water in the state for the next 50 years.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2004 | Jerry Hirsch and Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writers
The Metropolitan Water District is set to approve a landmark agreement that would pay farmers in two Southern California counties to take land out of production so that irrigation water could be diverted to urban users. The farmers, customers of an irrigation district in Riverside and Imperial counties, could collect an estimated $100 million over 35 years so that Colorado River water once reserved for growing crops could be routed to agencies serving 18 million Southern Californians.
OPINION
February 9, 2003 | William Fulton and Paul Shigley, William Fulton and Paul Shigley are the editors of the California Planning & Development Report. Fulton is also president of Solimar Research Group.
In the "good old days" of California growth, water was always an issue but never really a problem. If water seemed like a constraint on urban growth, there was always another river to dam, another reservoir to build -- or another legal loophole to exploit. All that's over now. A few more reservoirs may be built. But no more rivers will be dammed. And the legal loopholes are pushing water out of California nowadays rather than pulling it in.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2002 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
Bennett Raley, a slow-talking Coloradan in cowboy boots, has his hands on the faucet that sends water from the Colorado River to Southern California. He seems ready and willing to shut it off, which is scaring the cities and infuriating the farms that are competing for the precious resource.
NEWS
December 28, 1988 | MYRON LEVIN, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Interior Department has issued a water marketing policy that backers say could spur conservation and help meet urban water needs without costly new water projects. Responding to pleas from the Western Governors Assn. and some environmental groups, the federal agency said it will seek to expedite voluntary water transfers from those with excess water from federal dams and aqueducts to those who are water short.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2009 | Bettina Boxall
The chances that Sacramento will break the stalemate on California water policy this summer grew dimmer Tuesday when Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said he would not sign legislation that didn't include bonds for new reservoirs and dams. The declaration signaled Schwarzenegger's dissatisfaction with a package of water bills Democrats are hoping to move through the Legislature before the mid-September adjournment. "I will not sign anything that does not have above-the-ground, below-the-ground water storage," the governor said at a news conference on the steps of the Capitol in Sacramento.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2001
The saga of Senate Bill 221 shows that it is possible for a good idea to survive concerted attacks from special interests. Despite forecasts of its certain death this year, the measure, authored by Sen. Sheila Kuehl (D-Santa Monica), now is just one major step away from the desk of Gov. Gray Davis. This time it should pass and be signed into law. Kuehl's bill would require developers of large housing projects--500 units or more--to show that the homes would have the needed water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2001
Nearly every major water problem in California is tied in some way to the delta of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers, where the two merge before flowing out to San Francisco Bay. This 738,000-acre estuary southwest of Sacramento is the water heart of California. Its islands are rich in agriculture. The channels provide migration routes for salmon and habitat for 750 plant and animal species.
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