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Urbano Lugo

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SPORTS
June 17, 1985 | Associated Press
The latest milestone for Reggie Jackson satisfied the slugger not for what it meant to himself but for what it meant to the Angels. On Old-timer's Day in Anaheim Stadium, Jackson keyed the Angels' 3-1 victory Sunday over the Chicago White Sox with a fourth-inning solo home run, the 511th of his career, tying him with Hall of Fame member Mel Ott for 12th place on the all-time list. "It's nice that it came at a good time and it helped us win one," said Jackson.
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SPORTS
May 13, 1987 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Urbano Lugo never looked worse, which gives you an idea of how bad the Angels' 15-2 loss to Detroit was Tuesday night. "It wasn't exactly a Rembrandt," Angel Manager Gene Mauch said. "That was not a Picasso," Bob Boone said. It wasn't even a finger painting, with Lugo making a mess of everything he touched. If anything, it was an exercise in the surreal, with Lugo throwing baseballs that expanded as they neared each Tiger batter and sprouted wings as soon as they were hit.
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SPORTS
June 24, 1985 | MIKE DOWNEY
Who's got the best record in the American League West? Who's got a better record than most of the teams in the big, bad American League East? Who lost their manager, a star outfielder and one of their top relief pitchers to other American League teams during the off-season and didn't let it get them down? Could it be the California Angels? You bet your sweet Urbano Lugo it's the California Angels. The Angels, who have had to do without mercenaries Fred Lynn and Don Aase all season long.
SPORTS
May 1, 1987 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
When free agent Jack Morris came knocking on the Angels' door last December, owner Gene Autry and General Manager Mike Port took one look at the team payroll, took another at organization's pitching depth chart, listened to Morris' request for $2 million a year and quickly closed the door. Back then, it seemed like good business. The way Port figured, passing on Morris and promoting a prospect such as Willie Fraser or Urbano Lugo meant an annual savings of about $1.93 million.
SPORTS
February 26, 1987 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Urbano Lugo and Willie Fraser, step lightly and pitch tightly. That job you covet on the Angels' pitching staff--No. 5 starter--was baseball's own little shop of horrors in 1986, chewing up a host of good men. Remember those who went before you: --Jim Slaton. A nice guy who, because of John Candelaria's elbow surgery, began 1986 as the Angels' fifth starter. Lasted two months. Went 4-6 with a 5.65 earned-run average. Was released June 30. Later caught on as a mop-up man with the Detroit Tigers.
SPORTS
May 13, 1987 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Urbano Lugo never looked worse, which gives you an idea of how bad the Angels' 15-2 loss to Detroit was Tuesday night. "It wasn't exactly a Rembrandt," Angel Manager Gene Mauch said. "That was not a Picasso," Bob Boone said. It wasn't even a finger painting, with Lugo making a mess of everything he touched. If anything, it was an exercise in the surreal, with Lugo throwing baseballs that expanded as they neared each Tiger batter and sprouted wings as soon as they were hit.
SPORTS
May 1, 1987 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
When free agent Jack Morris came knocking on the Angels' door last December, owner Gene Autry and General Manager Mike Port took one look at the team payroll, took another at organization's pitching depth chart, listened to Morris' request for $2 million a year and quickly closed the door. Back then, it seemed like good business. The way Port figured, passing on Morris and promoting a prospect such as Willie Fraser or Urbano Lugo meant an annual savings of about $1.93 million.
SPORTS
June 30, 1985 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
Burdened with the memory of Friday night's 5-4 loss to Kansas City in 14 innings, Angel Manager Gene Mauch said he was never happier than when Royal left-hander Bud Black finally delivered the first pitch of Saturday night's game. On that basis, of course, Mauch had to be even happier when Angel right-hander Urbano Lugo delivered the last pitch, 2 hours 46 minutes later.
SPORTS
June 17, 1985 | JOHN WEYLER, Times Staff Writer
There was an Old-timers' Day game at Anaheim Stadium Sunday and one of the teams had a 39-year-old pitcher (Tom Murphy), a 39-year-old catcher (Tom Egan) and a 40-year-old infielder (Syd O'Brien). Then the Angels and the Chicago White Sox squared off in a major league contest and one team had a 39-year-old designated hitter (Reggie Jackson), a 37-year-old catcher (Bob Boone) and three infielders 34 or older (Bobby Grich, Doug DeCinces and Juan Beniquez).
SPORTS
June 28, 1985 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
If you've been following the box scores and the Angels' rather precarious existence atop the American League West standings, you probably have questions about this man Lugo, the newest name in a pitching rotation that suddenly is emphasizing newness. You already know about three--perfect-game artist Mike Witt, player representative Ron Romanick and reformed hockey player Kirk McCaskill. But Lugo . . . First off, which is it-- Rafael Lugo or Urbano Lugo?
SPORTS
February 26, 1987 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
Urbano Lugo and Willie Fraser, step lightly and pitch tightly. That job you covet on the Angels' pitching staff--No. 5 starter--was baseball's own little shop of horrors in 1986, chewing up a host of good men. Remember those who went before you: --Jim Slaton. A nice guy who, because of John Candelaria's elbow surgery, began 1986 as the Angels' fifth starter. Lasted two months. Went 4-6 with a 5.65 earned-run average. Was released June 30. Later caught on as a mop-up man with the Detroit Tigers.
SPORTS
June 30, 1985 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
Burdened with the memory of Friday night's 5-4 loss to Kansas City in 14 innings, Angel Manager Gene Mauch said he was never happier than when Royal left-hander Bud Black finally delivered the first pitch of Saturday night's game. On that basis, of course, Mauch had to be even happier when Angel right-hander Urbano Lugo delivered the last pitch, 2 hours 46 minutes later.
SPORTS
June 28, 1985 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
If you've been following the box scores and the Angels' rather precarious existence atop the American League West standings, you probably have questions about this man Lugo, the newest name in a pitching rotation that suddenly is emphasizing newness. You already know about three--perfect-game artist Mike Witt, player representative Ron Romanick and reformed hockey player Kirk McCaskill. But Lugo . . . First off, which is it-- Rafael Lugo or Urbano Lugo?
SPORTS
June 24, 1985 | MIKE DOWNEY
Who's got the best record in the American League West? Who's got a better record than most of the teams in the big, bad American League East? Who lost their manager, a star outfielder and one of their top relief pitchers to other American League teams during the off-season and didn't let it get them down? Could it be the California Angels? You bet your sweet Urbano Lugo it's the California Angels. The Angels, who have had to do without mercenaries Fred Lynn and Don Aase all season long.
SPORTS
June 17, 1985 | Associated Press
The latest milestone for Reggie Jackson satisfied the slugger not for what it meant to himself but for what it meant to the Angels. On Old-timer's Day in Anaheim Stadium, Jackson keyed the Angels' 3-1 victory Sunday over the Chicago White Sox with a fourth-inning solo home run, the 511th of his career, tying him with Hall of Fame member Mel Ott for 12th place on the all-time list. "It's nice that it came at a good time and it helped us win one," said Jackson.
SPORTS
June 17, 1985 | JOHN WEYLER, Times Staff Writer
There was an Old-timers' Day game at Anaheim Stadium Sunday and one of the teams had a 39-year-old pitcher (Tom Murphy), a 39-year-old catcher (Tom Egan) and a 40-year-old infielder (Syd O'Brien). Then the Angels and the Chicago White Sox squared off in a major league contest and one team had a 39-year-old designated hitter (Reggie Jackson), a 37-year-old catcher (Bob Boone) and three infielders 34 or older (Bobby Grich, Doug DeCinces and Juan Beniquez).
SPORTS
February 23, 1997
Players from Latin America and Mexico who were signed or drafted by the Angels and who reached the major leagues with the Angels.
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