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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
Environmentalists have announced an 18-month program to restore eelgrass in the waters off Anacapa Island, where sea urchins destroyed it in the 1980s. Drew Bohan, executive director of Santa Barbara Channelkeeper, said the project received a $30,000 matching grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Eelgrass grows in beds and supports marine life such as rockfish and kelp bass.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2013 | Tony Barboza
Below the gently rolling waves off the Palos Verdes Peninsula, a spiny purple menace is ravaging what should be a thriving kelp forest. Millions of sea urchins -- scrawny, diseased and desperate for food -- have overrun a band of the shallow seafloor, devouring kelp and crowding out most all other life at a time the giant green foliage is making a comeback elsewhere along the California coast. In an effort to remedy the situation, scientists and divers will spend the next five years culling the urchins from more than 152 acres of coastal waters degraded years ago by pollution.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1997
Re: Proposed closure of the Malibu coastline to commercial fishing. The citizens of Malibu do not learn well from history. In 1969-1970, California was spending taxpayer dollars to eradicate sea urchins. The urchin population was so large that it was decimating the kelp beds off the coast. Without the protection of the kelp forests, there was severe beach erosion which would have caused the loss of the expensive homes and other valuable property along the Malibu shoreline. Demise of the kelp forest would further degrade the environment by causing loss of habitat for numerous other species of fish and shellfish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Commercial fishermen have filed a lawsuit in federal court challenging the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for abandoning a program to create an "otter-free zone" in Southern California coastal waters that sustain shellfish industries. The lawsuit, filed this week by the Pacific Legal Foundation on behalf of harvesters of sea urchin, abalone and lobster south of Point Conception, accuses the agency of illegally terminating the program without congressional approval or authorization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1999
I am writing this to defend my name against the commonly used word "'overfishing." "Overfishing" insinuates commercial fishermen are to blame for 20 million people who think this is a pretty neat place to live. I am not sure if the general public is aware of this, but overfishing is a relative term. For example, if you have only two fish remaining in the ocean and their offspring have a snowball's chance in hell of survival because of gross mismanagement of a fishery, pollution, loss of habitat and global warming, then a fisherman catching one of these might be guilty of over-harvesting.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1988 | RICHARD CROMELIN
*** 1/2JANE'S ADDICTION. "Nothing's Shocking." Warner Bros. Life is tough. Everybody is so full of it. Might as well crank things up to a head-rattling, Zeppelin-in-overdrive pitch and get it out of our systems. Life is also odd and interesting. Better take time to cool it and lay back and trip out and roll a few things over in the old mind. Those are the two operative modes on the debut album from Jane's Addiction, the latest band to attempt the transition from big deal on the L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1987 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Times Staff Writer
Emo Phillips is a cult comedian, a thin, pasty, grungy-looking figure in grab-bag threads and a dank pageboy whose fuse-blown eyes suggest someone raising himself unsteadily from a month of lost weekends jammed back-to-back. He writhes and waves his skinny right arm like a schoolkid desperately calling for permission to make, and he pulls up his laceless shoes knee high as though life's pilgrim trail was impacted with animal droppings.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2010 | Los Angeles Times
Another basketball season ends in a hard-fought NBA title for Pau Gasol and the Lakers. "I'm still in the process of getting my body back to normal," the Redondo Beach resident admitted. "It takes awhile to adjust from all the crazy activity and intensity and then to not having it." But while Gasol has plenty of R&R penciled in this summer, he's not ratcheting things down completely. First up is a trip to his native Spain to celebrate his 30th birthday on July 6; then there are his charitable efforts, which include the L.A. Fire Department and Childrens Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1987 | RUTH REICHL
China Grill, 60 West 53rd St., New York City. Open for dinner daily (lunch after Nov. 1). Full bar. All major credit cards accepted. Dinner for two, food only, about $70. The look in this city's newest restaurant is pure N.Y. The taste, however, is decidedly L.A. The space inside New York's elegant "Black Rock" (home of CBS), soars upward towards great banks of hand-made lamps which hover just beneath the ceiling like clouds that have somehow been pulled indoors.
OPINION
October 10, 2005
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has committed another major blunder. The Oct. 3 article, "Efforts to Restore Kelp Suffering Growing Pains," blamed the disappearance of Southern California kelp on "marauding sea urchins." The Oct. 6 article, "Agency Seeks to Lift Otter Ban," discussed the failed attempts at keeping threatened sea otters out of Southern California to help fishermen. What do otters eat? Urchins. For heaven's sake, Fish and Wildlife, put your heads together and go "duh"!
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2010 | Los Angeles Times
Another basketball season ends in a hard-fought NBA title for Pau Gasol and the Lakers. "I'm still in the process of getting my body back to normal," the Redondo Beach resident admitted. "It takes awhile to adjust from all the crazy activity and intensity and then to not having it." But while Gasol has plenty of R&R penciled in this summer, he's not ratcheting things down completely. First up is a trip to his native Spain to celebrate his 30th birthday on July 6; then there are his charitable efforts, which include the L.A. Fire Department and Childrens Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2008 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
The Sunstar's ancient twin diesels fire up like an old man clearing his throat. Terry Herzik cocks his good ear to listen. They are losing compression, but sound as if they should make the three-day trip. Dawn glows faintly behind the gantry cranes and shuttered canneries that overlook Fish Harbor, a blighted abscess of Terminal Island.
NATIONAL
December 28, 2007 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
What was intended as a noble science experiment in the 1970s has turned into a modern-day plague for the delicate coral reefs surrounding the University of Hawaii's research station here. A professor scoured the seas for the heartiest, fastest-growing algae to help Third World nations develop a seaweed crop for carrageenan -- the gelatinous thickener and emulsifier used in such items as toothpaste, shoe polish and nonfat ice cream. The late Maxwell Doty succeeded, in one regard.
SCIENCE
November 11, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers have mapped the genome of the California purple sea urchin, a development that could advance genetic research into human diseases, according to a report published Friday in the journal Science. Sea urchins are popular research animals because they are easy to manipulate genetically and share 70% of their genes and proteins with humans, including those associated with muscular dystrophy and Huntington's disease, according to the study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2006 | Hemmy So, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of dead or dying purple sea urchins washed up into the Little Corona Marine Life Refuge tide pools in recent days, a phenomenon some officials blame on warmer-than-usual waters. "On Monday there were two or three hundred that littered just the tide pool area," said Amy Stine, Newport Beach marine life refuge supervisor. Normally, she said, she sees at most three urchin shells a day. "Most of them that are now left on the shore are dead.
OPINION
October 10, 2005
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has committed another major blunder. The Oct. 3 article, "Efforts to Restore Kelp Suffering Growing Pains," blamed the disappearance of Southern California kelp on "marauding sea urchins." The Oct. 6 article, "Agency Seeks to Lift Otter Ban," discussed the failed attempts at keeping threatened sea otters out of Southern California to help fishermen. What do otters eat? Urchins. For heaven's sake, Fish and Wildlife, put your heads together and go "duh"!
SCIENCE
November 11, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers have mapped the genome of the California purple sea urchin, a development that could advance genetic research into human diseases, according to a report published Friday in the journal Science. Sea urchins are popular research animals because they are easy to manipulate genetically and share 70% of their genes and proteins with humans, including those associated with muscular dystrophy and Huntington's disease, according to the study.
FOOD
March 7, 1985 | MINNIE BERNARDINO, Times Staff Writer
Question: At a Japanese buffet restaurant that we frequently go to, a baked seafood dish was served that tasted strangely different to us. It had a somewhat coarse or grainy texture. The waiter said it was uni , which I found out later was the translation for sea urchin. Picturing a sea urchin with sharp spines, I cannot visualize getting anything edible from this creature. Can you please tell us more about this seafood, its safety and nutritional value?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2005 | Sara Lin, Times Staff Writer
After 18 years of failed attempts to keep sea otters out of most Southern California waters at the behest of fishermen, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Wednesday recommended abandoning the effort, saying the move would benefit the threatened species. The agency also called for ending a program to relocate sea otters from Monterey Bay to San Nicolas Island, 60 miles off the Southern California coast.
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