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Uric Acid

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SCIENCE
August 30, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Reducing levels of uric acid in the blood with allopurinol, a drug used to treat gout, lowered blood pressure to normal in teenagers, Texas researchers reported Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. The drug will probably not prove to be a good therapy for hypertension because of its side effects, the researchers said, but the finding provides new insight into the causes of the disorder, showing a role for uric acid for the first time. Studies in animals suggest that excess uric acid triggers the renin angiotensin system, shrinking key blood vessels and thereby increasing blood pressure.
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NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
One in five Americans has admitted to peeing in a public swimming pool, according to a new survey. That's 20% of Americans urinating where others swim. Besides being disgusting, peeing in the pool may be seriously harmful to your health. In a new study , researchers from China Agricultural University and Purdue University looked at what happened when uric acid, a byproduct of urine, and chlorine combined. The group found dangerous chemical reactions were a result of this unholy union.
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SCIENCE
October 4, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers have discovered three genes linked to gout, a disease marked by the painful buildup of uric acid crystals in joints, tendons and surrounding tissues. An estimated 3 million Americans suffer from the disorder. Researchers reported Wednesday in the journal Lancet that all three genes are associated with transport of uric acid and that individuals with the mutant forms of all three genes have 40 times the normal risk of developing gout. Gene analysis could be used to identify people who should not receive certain drugs that are known to increase the risk of gout, researchers said.
NEWS
February 28, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
I expect consequences from drinking lots of sugary sodas. Like: unneeded calories, possible spikes in blood sugar, slow but steady erosion of tooth enamel (if those oft-repeated science fair projects with the teeth in the plastic cup of Coke are to be believed) and caffeine jitters. But a rise in blood pressure? A study just published in the journal Hypertension argues that you might be in for that if you have a sugary-beverage habit. The finding comes from the so-called INTERMAP study, which stands for International study of Macro/Micronutrients and Blood Pressure, which kind of works as a name if you ignore words like “study” and “blood.
HEALTH
January 18, 1999 | BARBARA J. CHUCK
Attacks of gout can be intermittent, lasting days or even weeks. Often intensely painful, this inflammatory disease of joints is caused by too much uric acid (a waste product made by the body) in the blood. It usually begins in men after about age 30 and in women after menopause. In about half the people, the initial episode of gout occurs in the first joint of the big toe.
HEALTH
March 15, 2004 | Jane E. Allen
Because gout is marked by the formation of uric acid crystals in the joints, doctors have generally advised patients at risk of the painful condition to avoid animal products and those vegetables rich in purines. That chemical is broken down by the body into uric acid. Now a study has pinpointed the risky foods and exonerated others.
HEALTH
October 30, 2000
It may sound like a disease that plagued kings in the Middle Ages, but gout still afflicts 2.1 million Americans today. Health spoke to Dr. Rodney Bluestone, a rheumatologist and clinical professor of medicine at UCLA who sits on the board of directors of the Southern California chapter of the Arthritis Foundation. Question: When I think of gout, I picture King Henry VIII at a banquet table, propping up his red, swollen foot on a velvet stool while he eats overly rich foods.
FOOD
February 13, 1986 | PAUL JOHNSON and ISAAC CRONIN, Cronin and Johnson are co-authors of "The California Seafood Cookbook."
Skates and rays, which are closely related, are found in all the seas of the world and are popular in many cuisines. The delicate meat of the skate, which is white with red mottling on one side, is firm, white and tasty. Rib-like cords constitute the structure of the meat, which is somewhat fragile. Skate can be grilled or deep-fried in batter if handled carefully. Like flank steak it can be stuffed, rolled and baked or braised.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
One in five Americans has admitted to peeing in a public swimming pool, according to a new survey. That's 20% of Americans urinating where others swim. Besides being disgusting, peeing in the pool may be seriously harmful to your health. In a new study , researchers from China Agricultural University and Purdue University looked at what happened when uric acid, a byproduct of urine, and chlorine combined. The group found dangerous chemical reactions were a result of this unholy union.
NEWS
September 14, 2010
The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that it has approved a new drug to treat gout in patients who do not respond to existing therapy. The drug is called Krystexxa and is manufactured by Savient Pharmaceuticals Inc. of East Brunswick, N.J. The FDA had rejected the drug in August of 2009 because of manufacturing problems. In a letter to the company then, the agency said that the potential commercial supplies of the drug were not identical to the product used in clinical trials.
NEWS
September 14, 2010
The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday that it has approved a new drug to treat gout in patients who do not respond to existing therapy. The drug is called Krystexxa and is manufactured by Savient Pharmaceuticals Inc. of East Brunswick, N.J. The FDA had rejected the drug in August of 2009 because of manufacturing problems. In a letter to the company then, the agency said that the potential commercial supplies of the drug were not identical to the product used in clinical trials.
SCIENCE
October 4, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers have discovered three genes linked to gout, a disease marked by the painful buildup of uric acid crystals in joints, tendons and surrounding tissues. An estimated 3 million Americans suffer from the disorder. Researchers reported Wednesday in the journal Lancet that all three genes are associated with transport of uric acid and that individuals with the mutant forms of all three genes have 40 times the normal risk of developing gout. Gene analysis could be used to identify people who should not receive certain drugs that are known to increase the risk of gout, researchers said.
SCIENCE
August 30, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Reducing levels of uric acid in the blood with allopurinol, a drug used to treat gout, lowered blood pressure to normal in teenagers, Texas researchers reported Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. The drug will probably not prove to be a good therapy for hypertension because of its side effects, the researchers said, but the finding provides new insight into the causes of the disorder, showing a role for uric acid for the first time. Studies in animals suggest that excess uric acid triggers the renin angiotensin system, shrinking key blood vessels and thereby increasing blood pressure.
HEALTH
March 15, 2004 | Jane E. Allen
Because gout is marked by the formation of uric acid crystals in the joints, doctors have generally advised patients at risk of the painful condition to avoid animal products and those vegetables rich in purines. That chemical is broken down by the body into uric acid. Now a study has pinpointed the risky foods and exonerated others.
HEALTH
October 30, 2000
It may sound like a disease that plagued kings in the Middle Ages, but gout still afflicts 2.1 million Americans today. Health spoke to Dr. Rodney Bluestone, a rheumatologist and clinical professor of medicine at UCLA who sits on the board of directors of the Southern California chapter of the Arthritis Foundation. Question: When I think of gout, I picture King Henry VIII at a banquet table, propping up his red, swollen foot on a velvet stool while he eats overly rich foods.
HEALTH
January 18, 1999 | BARBARA J. CHUCK
Attacks of gout can be intermittent, lasting days or even weeks. Often intensely painful, this inflammatory disease of joints is caused by too much uric acid (a waste product made by the body) in the blood. It usually begins in men after about age 30 and in women after menopause. In about half the people, the initial episode of gout occurs in the first joint of the big toe.
NEWS
February 28, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
I expect consequences from drinking lots of sugary sodas. Like: unneeded calories, possible spikes in blood sugar, slow but steady erosion of tooth enamel (if those oft-repeated science fair projects with the teeth in the plastic cup of Coke are to be believed) and caffeine jitters. But a rise in blood pressure? A study just published in the journal Hypertension argues that you might be in for that if you have a sugary-beverage habit. The finding comes from the so-called INTERMAP study, which stands for International study of Macro/Micronutrients and Blood Pressure, which kind of works as a name if you ignore words like “study” and “blood.
SCIENCE
August 5, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tests of a 450-year-old pinkie finger confirm that Holy Roman Emperor Charles V was debilitated by gout and the painful joints it produces, Spanish researchers reported Wednesday. Jaume Ordi of the University of Barcelona and colleagues examined the finger, preserved in a red velvet box, and found telltale signs of gout, including the buildup of uric acid crystals. Charles V ruled from 1516 to 1556, controlling lands in Europe, Africa and Asia.
FOOD
February 13, 1986 | PAUL JOHNSON and ISAAC CRONIN, Cronin and Johnson are co-authors of "The California Seafood Cookbook."
Skates and rays, which are closely related, are found in all the seas of the world and are popular in many cuisines. The delicate meat of the skate, which is white with red mottling on one side, is firm, white and tasty. Rib-like cords constitute the structure of the meat, which is somewhat fragile. Skate can be grilled or deep-fried in batter if handled carefully. Like flank steak it can be stuffed, rolled and baked or braised.
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