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Urinary Incontinence

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Surgery should be considered as an initial treatment for female stress urinary incontinence, according to guidelines released Wednesday by the American Urological Assn. A review of medical literature examining surgery showed that the method provides a long-term cure in most cases, an association expert panel stated. Urinary incontinence affects about 13 million adults in the United States.
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NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The PSA test should not be a routine screen for men of any age, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force declared earlier this week. The assessment wasn't about saving money but was based on a review of the science on PSA screening -- what were the benefits and what were the harms? To recap: The task force concluded from two large studies that over a period of 10 years, one prostate cancer death at most was saved from PSA screening for every 1,000 men screened. The test finds many cancers that are not life-threatening, and treatment causes side effects from surgery and radiation such as impotence and urinary incontinence.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1989 | Associated Press
A study reported recently said simple behavioral techniques may offer some solutions to urinary incontinence, which affects at least 4.6 million Americans and has annual health care costs about $10 billion.
HEALTH
August 25, 2008 | Devon Schuyler, Special to The Times
Maria Stubbs, a 44-year-old mother from Carson, wasn't surprised when she leaked a little urine after the birth of her third daughter 10 years ago; she had experienced a bit of leakage during and immediately after all three of her pregnancies. But when a full year had passed and she was still crossing her legs to stave off leakage every time she coughed, she knew she had a problem. Her low point occurred when she was washing dishes and suddenly urinated on the kitchen floor. "After I cried, I told my husband I had to do something," she said.
HEALTH
December 2, 2002 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Vaginal childbirth can so damage nerves and muscles that as many as one-quarter of women suffer later from urinary incontinence. Some women even opt to have caesarean sections to reduce their risk. But there may be a way to give birth vaginally and avoid long-term pelvic-floor problems. That's what experts in midwifery, sports medicine and biomechanics hope to reveal in an unusual study at the University of Michigan.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Irvine-based Allergan Inc. -- which is testing its beauty drug Botox as a tonic for overactive bladders -- plans to buy Esprit Pharma Inc. and its U.S. rights to a urinary incontinence drug. Allergan said Wednesday that it had agreed to pay $370 million in cash for Esprit, which sells the incontinence drug Sanctura under a U.S. license from Indevus Pharmaceuticals Inc. Esprit would be Allergan's first major purchase since 2005, when it acquired Inamed Corp.
HEALTH
August 25, 2008 | Devon Schuyler, Special to The Times
Maria Stubbs, a 44-year-old mother from Carson, wasn't surprised when she leaked a little urine after the birth of her third daughter 10 years ago; she had experienced a bit of leakage during and immediately after all three of her pregnancies. But when a full year had passed and she was still crossing her legs to stave off leakage every time she coughed, she knew she had a problem. Her low point occurred when she was washing dishes and suddenly urinated on the kitchen floor. "After I cried, I told my husband I had to do something," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1999 | Tricia Schwennesen, (949) 248-2151
Urinary incontinence affects 25 million Americans, but many sufferers are hesitant about getting help. The South Coast Medical Center will hold a free presentation on treatments for the disorder. The one-hour presentation will begin at 1:30 p.m. Friday in the hospital community room, 31872 Coast Highway. Reservations: (949) 499-7202.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | SHARI ROAN
Amajor public health campaign has been launched to assist the 9 million American women with stress urinary incontinence. The message: There is medical treatment. The "Life Without Limits" campaign is sponsored by the American Medical Women's Assn. and is being publicized by actress Marg Helgenberger. The idea is to de-stigmatize a problem that affects many women after age 35. Surveys show that more than 60% of women with the problem have never spoken to their doctors about it.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1996
Advanced Surgical Intervention received Food and Drug Administration approval for a new prescription urinary incontinence pad for women. The disposable pad, about the size of a quarter, has an adhesive coating that is placed over the urethra to form a seal and stop urine from leaking. Although not always effective, it should help women who leak urine after physical stress such as coughing, laughing or lifting heavy objects, the FDA said.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Irvine-based Allergan Inc. -- which is testing its beauty drug Botox as a tonic for overactive bladders -- plans to buy Esprit Pharma Inc. and its U.S. rights to a urinary incontinence drug. Allergan said Wednesday that it had agreed to pay $370 million in cash for Esprit, which sells the incontinence drug Sanctura under a U.S. license from Indevus Pharmaceuticals Inc. Esprit would be Allergan's first major purchase since 2005, when it acquired Inamed Corp.
HEALTH
December 2, 2002 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Vaginal childbirth can so damage nerves and muscles that as many as one-quarter of women suffer later from urinary incontinence. Some women even opt to have caesarean sections to reduce their risk. But there may be a way to give birth vaginally and avoid long-term pelvic-floor problems. That's what experts in midwifery, sports medicine and biomechanics hope to reveal in an unusual study at the University of Michigan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1999 | Tricia Schwennesen, (949) 248-2151
Urinary incontinence affects 25 million Americans, but many sufferers are hesitant about getting help. The South Coast Medical Center will hold a free presentation on treatments for the disorder. The one-hour presentation will begin at 1:30 p.m. Friday in the hospital community room, 31872 Coast Highway. Reservations: (949) 499-7202.
HEALTH
August 30, 1999 | CAROL KRUCOFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than two-thirds of female gymnasts say it happens frequently. Twenty-eight percent of female college athletes have experienced it at some point when participating in their sport. And among people older than 60, some 40% of women and 20% of men suffer from it. Urinary incontinence, the once-taboo topic of involuntary urine leakage, has come out of the closet in recent years.
HEALTH
January 25, 1999 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Adult diapers may be a $16-billion industry, but there are signs that aging baby boomers are looking for far better ways to address the very common problem of incontinence. And medicine isn't letting them down. With the help of simple exercises, medication and surgery, many people are overcoming incontinence and finding their way back to nice cotton underpants (or even sexy lingerie). More than 15 million Americans have incontinence, and 85% of them are women--and not just elderly women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Surgery should be considered as an initial treatment for female stress urinary incontinence, according to guidelines released Wednesday by the American Urological Assn. A review of medical literature examining surgery showed that the method provides a long-term cure in most cases, an association expert panel stated. Urinary incontinence affects about 13 million adults in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Ten million Americans suffer from urinary incontinence and most could be helped if doctors would apply proven treatments in more cases, according to a National Institutes of Health committee. "We're not talking about rocket science here," said Dr. John W. Rowe, chairman of the 15-member consensus development panel. "This is something we can do tomorrow."
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The PSA test should not be a routine screen for men of any age, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force declared earlier this week. The assessment wasn't about saving money but was based on a review of the science on PSA screening -- what were the benefits and what were the harms? To recap: The task force concluded from two large studies that over a period of 10 years, one prostate cancer death at most was saved from PSA screening for every 1,000 men screened. The test finds many cancers that are not life-threatening, and treatment causes side effects from surgery and radiation such as impotence and urinary incontinence.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | SHARI ROAN
Amajor public health campaign has been launched to assist the 9 million American women with stress urinary incontinence. The message: There is medical treatment. The "Life Without Limits" campaign is sponsored by the American Medical Women's Assn. and is being publicized by actress Marg Helgenberger. The idea is to de-stigmatize a problem that affects many women after age 35. Surveys show that more than 60% of women with the problem have never spoken to their doctors about it.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1996
Advanced Surgical Intervention received Food and Drug Administration approval for a new prescription urinary incontinence pad for women. The disposable pad, about the size of a quarter, has an adhesive coating that is placed over the urethra to form a seal and stop urine from leaking. Although not always effective, it should help women who leak urine after physical stress such as coughing, laughing or lifting heavy objects, the FDA said.
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