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Urinary Tract

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NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Urinary tract infections are common conditions that occur when bacteria from the intestines enter the urinary tract. New research, however, suggests that the bacteria causing these infections may come from contaminated food -- especially chickens. While it sounds bizarre, studies from Canadian researchers show that stricter chicken-farm ani-contamination practices may help curb cases of urinary tract infections. In 2010, researchers showed that the most common cause of the infections -- E. coli bacteria -- can originate in food.
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NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Amina Khan
A deadly bacteria that's practically impervious to antibiotics is on the rise and has appeared in medical facilities in 42 U.S. states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. The rate of infection from carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, might seem low -- 4% -- but it has risen fourfold in just the last decade. CRE is resistant even to last-resort drugs such as carbapenem and can potentially be very deadly. Up to half of patients who develop a bloodstream infection from CRE die, according to the CDC report.
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NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
Women who get urinary tract infections - and that's nearly half of all women -- likely know this already: Try cranberry. It's a treatment that's been passed around among women for a long time to prevent the recurrence of this annoying infection. Unlike some folk remedies, this one has gained credence through the years from the experts - the medical experts, that is. And a study in the Archives of Internal Medicine reinforces the use of cranberry products to prevent UTIs - one of the most common bacterial infections among adult women, with about 7 million doctor visits a year in the United States alone.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
Women who get urinary tract infections - and that's nearly half of all women -- likely know this already: Try cranberry. It's a treatment that's been passed around among women for a long time to prevent the recurrence of this annoying infection. Unlike some folk remedies, this one has gained credence through the years from the experts - the medical experts, that is. And a study in the Archives of Internal Medicine reinforces the use of cranberry products to prevent UTIs - one of the most common bacterial infections among adult women, with about 7 million doctor visits a year in the United States alone.
HEALTH
May 17, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Q: I published the original article on cranberry juice cocktail and urinary tract infections (Journal of Urology, May 1984). We also demonstrated in several nursing home studies that cranberry juice cocktail, not the plain juice, works best. Please spare your readers the tartness of the straight juice. — Anthony E. Sobota, PhD A: Thank you for investigating this old wives' tale in such a scientific manner. Investigators have confirmed your original findings and explored why it works (Urology online, April 16, 2010)
HEALTH
March 17, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Drinking a glass of fresh berry juice every day may help women avoid urinary tract infections. A study of more than 200 Finnish women, mostly under 30, found that a glass of fresh fruit juice a day reduced the risk of infection by about a third, and that berry juice cut the odds even more. Yogurt or sour milk also helped prevent infection. Most berries contain flavonols called proanthocyanidines, which prevent bacteria found in stool from adhering to human cells.
NEWS
August 9, 1986 | ELEANOR CLIFT, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan enters Bethesda Naval Hospital today for a series of urinary tract tests that will follow up on previous examinations and are unrelated to his cancer surgery of last year, the White House announced Friday. Reagan is expected to return to the White House in the afternoon. While at the hospital, he will participate in a voluntary drug testing program for top-ranking presidential aides, which is scheduled to begin Monday.
SPORTS
February 7, 1986
Guard Wes Matthews of the San Antonio Spurs, originally thought to have kidney stones, is suffering from a congenital disorder that blocks his urinary tract and will sideline him for the rest of the season, the team reported. Tests showed Matthews suffers from a pelvic junction obstruction, which is causing swelling.
NEWS
January 6, 1986
Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace, hospitalized for the second time in 16 months for a urinary tract infection, was in fair condition in University Hospitals in Birmingham, a spokesman said. The spokesman said Wallace, 66, was receiving antibiotics and "came through the evening just as expected."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1985 | Associated Press
Sen. John P. East (R-N.C.) underwent surgery to remove a benign obstruction from his urinary tract, his office announced. "Everything went well," press secretary Jerry Woodruff said after the operation Friday.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Urinary tract infections are common conditions that occur when bacteria from the intestines enter the urinary tract. New research, however, suggests that the bacteria causing these infections may come from contaminated food -- especially chickens. While it sounds bizarre, studies from Canadian researchers show that stricter chicken-farm ani-contamination practices may help curb cases of urinary tract infections. In 2010, researchers showed that the most common cause of the infections -- E. coli bacteria -- can originate in food.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Eating cranberries to help prevent urinary tract infections is an old home remedy that has stood the test of time. But women who have recurrent urinary tract infections will find more relief from antibiotics, researchers said Monday. An estimated 30% of premenopausal women develop chronic urinary tract infections. A low dose of the antibiotic trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is often prescribed to women who have repeated urinary tract infections in order to prevent recurrences. Typically, however, doctors try to avoid long-term use of antibiotics because it can lead to antibiotic resistance.
OPINION
May 27, 2011
Despite the overwrought claims made by its opponents, male circumcision is not remotely tantamount to mutilation. Complications are rare and generally minor and short term. And circumcision has been linked to various health benefits. Nevertheless, a measure to ban male circumcision in children has obtained the required 12,000 signatures to qualify for the November ballot in San Francisco — and an anti-circumcision group is now targeting Santa Monica for a similar ballot proposal.
NEWS
May 24, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Having the urge to urinate -- and not being able to do so -- is painful, as many men know. Now a study suggests that certain medications may make the emergency form of this condition, known as acute urinary retention, more likely. The news may not come as a complete surprise. Painful urination or difficulty urinating are listed as possible side effects of the drugs studied – sold under the names Atrovent, Combivent and Spiriva. But the new study tries to quantify the risk of emergency urinary problems associated with the drugs.  Using a database of 565,073 Canadians with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, researchers from St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto identified 9,432 men and 1,806 women who had developed acute urinary retention.
HEALTH
May 17, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
Q: I published the original article on cranberry juice cocktail and urinary tract infections (Journal of Urology, May 1984). We also demonstrated in several nursing home studies that cranberry juice cocktail, not the plain juice, works best. Please spare your readers the tartness of the straight juice. — Anthony E. Sobota, PhD A: Thank you for investigating this old wives' tale in such a scientific manner. Investigators have confirmed your original findings and explored why it works (Urology online, April 16, 2010)
NATIONAL
July 5, 2003 | From Associated Press
Millions of people have repeated urinary tract infections, despite the high-powered antibiotics of modern medicine. A new study suggests the reason why: A germ that invades the bladder builds a fort-like colony that resists both antibiotics and the body's own immune system. Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis used a powerful electron microscope to discover that pods of bacteria routinely form inside the cells lining the walls of the bladder in mice that have E.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Jordanian royal palace announced that "abnormal" cells were found in sections of King Hussein's urinary tract removed during surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., last week. It did not say whether the cells were malignant. But it said that the biopsy persuaded surgeons to remove Hussein's left kidney as well.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1986
A subsidiary of NMS Pharmaceuticals Inc. in Newport Beach will begin marketing its urine blood test, a quick method for screening potential urinary tract problems, to consumers and professionals in late August, the company said last week. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the marketing of the dip-stick test produced by NMS's Self Care Systems Inc. subsidiary, the parent company said. The product is the most sensitive one available for diagnosing blood in the urine, NMS said.
HEALTH
March 17, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Drinking a glass of fresh berry juice every day may help women avoid urinary tract infections. A study of more than 200 Finnish women, mostly under 30, found that a glass of fresh fruit juice a day reduced the risk of infection by about a third, and that berry juice cut the odds even more. Yogurt or sour milk also helped prevent infection. Most berries contain flavonols called proanthocyanidines, which prevent bacteria found in stool from adhering to human cells.
HEALTH
October 8, 2001 | SUSAN OKIE, WASHINGTON POST
A newly identified, antibiotic-resistant strain of a common bacterium is contributing to an increase in relatively hard-to-treat bladder infections in women in at least three U.S. cities, according to a study published Thursday. Genetic analysis and other laboratory tests pinpointed the strain of Escherichia coli bacteria as the culprit in a substantial percentage of drug-resistant urinary tract infections among female university students in Berkeley, Minneapolis and Ann Arbor, Mich.
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