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Urinary Tract Infections

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NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Urinary tract infections are common conditions that occur when bacteria from the intestines enter the urinary tract. New research, however, suggests that the bacteria causing these infections may come from contaminated food -- especially chickens. While it sounds bizarre, studies from Canadian researchers show that stricter chicken-farm ani-contamination practices may help curb cases of urinary tract infections. In 2010, researchers showed that the most common cause of the infections -- E. coli bacteria -- can originate in food.
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NEWS
April 18, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Despite surging cases of infections unresponsive to existing antibiotic drugs, the number of medications under development or receiving approval from the Food and Drug Administration is dwindling and remains "alarmingly low," a new report warns. Most concerning, according to the Infectious Disease Society of America , is the "near absence" of antibiotic candidate drugs capable of combating new strains of bacteria that are uniquely dangerous: These "gram-negative" bacteria are not only resistant to most available antibiotic drugs themselves, they can pass genetic materials on to other bacteria that make them impervious to existing medications as well.
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NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Eating cranberries to help prevent urinary tract infections is an old home remedy that has stood the test of time. But women who have recurrent urinary tract infections will find more relief from antibiotics, researchers said Monday. An estimated 30% of premenopausal women develop chronic urinary tract infections. A low dose of the antibiotic trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is often prescribed to women who have repeated urinary tract infections in order to prevent recurrences. Typically, however, doctors try to avoid long-term use of antibiotics because it can lead to antibiotic resistance.
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
Former President George H.W. Bush was admitted to the intensive care unit of a Houston hospital Sunday, a spokesman announced Wednesday. There aren't a lot of details, but the former president, who is 88, originally went to Methodist Hospital on Nov. 23 with a lingering cough. That improved, but he remained in the hospital over Christmas and was admitted to the ICU after setbacks that included a persistent and rising fever . We spoke with Dr. Kent Shoji, emergency room physician at Marina Del Rey Hospital in Marina del Rey - who isn't involved in the former president's care - about the various causes of lingering fevers.
HEALTH
March 17, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Drinking a glass of fresh berry juice every day may help women avoid urinary tract infections. A study of more than 200 Finnish women, mostly under 30, found that a glass of fresh fruit juice a day reduced the risk of infection by about a third, and that berry juice cut the odds even more. Yogurt or sour milk also helped prevent infection. Most berries contain flavonols called proanthocyanidines, which prevent bacteria found in stool from adhering to human cells.
NEWS
November 1, 1994 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The first clue might be an annoying need to visit the bathroom way too often. That's followed by a burning sensation while urinating and sometimes pain in the pelvic area. Urinary tract infections most often affect women, but men aren't immune, especially in later life when enlargement of the prostate gland can increase the likelihood. But lately there's good news for sufferers.
HEALTH
April 14, 2003 | Shari Roan
Native Americans used cranberries to treat wounds. Settlers found they helped prevent urinary tract infections. Extract may not be as effective. Uses: To prevent and treat urinary tract infections. Dose: About 10 ounces daily of cranberry juice may help prevent urinary tract infections. People who dislike cranberry juice sometimes use supplements; doses are typically 1,000 milligrams a day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
A combination of antibiotics taken after intercourse appears to be highly effective in preventing urinary tract infections among women prone to such disorders, researchers reported last week. The drugs involved are commonly sold under the trade names Bactrim and Septra. Researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle said they tested a group of women who had suffered at least two urinary tract infections in the preceding year.
HEALTH
July 25, 2005 | Kevin W. McCullough, Times Staff Writer
Many parents give cranberry juice to their children for urinary tract infections. But many parents don't discuss the treatment with their doctor, according to a new study. Cranberry is commonly recommended for urinary tract infections. Although some research has shown its effectiveness in adults, few studies have focused on children. Cranberries can help prevent the infections by interfering with bacteria's ability to stick to certain urinary tract cells. A study by Dr.
NEWS
July 12, 1985 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
New evidence has emerged to validate the link--tenuous until now--between the diaphragm and urinary tract infections in women. It isn't clear whether a different diaphragm design would help or even how the diaphragm happens to make it easier for urinary tract infections to occur. But a team of researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle has added new confirmation to conclusions by a Los Angeles urologist first published about three years ago that initially made the link.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
Women who get urinary tract infections - and that's nearly half of all women -- likely know this already: Try cranberry. It's a treatment that's been passed around among women for a long time to prevent the recurrence of this annoying infection. Unlike some folk remedies, this one has gained credence through the years from the experts - the medical experts, that is. And a study in the Archives of Internal Medicine reinforces the use of cranberry products to prevent UTIs - one of the most common bacterial infections among adult women, with about 7 million doctor visits a year in the United States alone.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Urinary tract infections are common conditions that occur when bacteria from the intestines enter the urinary tract. New research, however, suggests that the bacteria causing these infections may come from contaminated food -- especially chickens. While it sounds bizarre, studies from Canadian researchers show that stricter chicken-farm ani-contamination practices may help curb cases of urinary tract infections. In 2010, researchers showed that the most common cause of the infections -- E. coli bacteria -- can originate in food.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Eating cranberries to help prevent urinary tract infections is an old home remedy that has stood the test of time. But women who have recurrent urinary tract infections will find more relief from antibiotics, researchers said Monday. An estimated 30% of premenopausal women develop chronic urinary tract infections. A low dose of the antibiotic trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is often prescribed to women who have repeated urinary tract infections in order to prevent recurrences. Typically, however, doctors try to avoid long-term use of antibiotics because it can lead to antibiotic resistance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Dr. Walter E. Stamm, whose discoveries on the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections and of the relationship between chlamydia and pelvic inflammatory disease saved tens of thousands of women from infertility, died Dec. 14 at his home in Seattle. He was 64 and had been battling melanoma. Stamm "was one of the giants . . . who really transformed diagnosis and treatment of genitourinary infections, particularly those that result in pelvic inflammatory diseases," said Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which funded much of his work.
HEALTH
July 25, 2005 | Kevin W. McCullough, Times Staff Writer
Many parents give cranberry juice to their children for urinary tract infections. But many parents don't discuss the treatment with their doctor, according to a new study. Cranberry is commonly recommended for urinary tract infections. Although some research has shown its effectiveness in adults, few studies have focused on children. Cranberries can help prevent the infections by interfering with bacteria's ability to stick to certain urinary tract cells. A study by Dr.
NATIONAL
July 5, 2003 | From Associated Press
Millions of people have repeated urinary tract infections, despite the high-powered antibiotics of modern medicine. A new study suggests the reason why: A germ that invades the bladder builds a fort-like colony that resists both antibiotics and the body's own immune system. Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis used a powerful electron microscope to discover that pods of bacteria routinely form inside the cells lining the walls of the bladder in mice that have E.
NEWS
July 26, 1985
Re "Diaphragm Linked to Infection," by Allan Parachini, July 12: I'll never forget the time, 15 years ago, when I suffered repeated episodes of urinary tract infections, and I told my oh-so-experienced gynecologist that they were definitely aggravated by my diaphragm. He smiled at my foolishness, and assured me that there was no possible link between the use of the diaphragm and the infection. The same thing occurred seven years ago, with another doctor. Of course, these doctors made me feel very silly and unsure of myself, and many women I talked to also knew that incorrect positioning or overuse or other factors related to diaphragms did, indeed, "cause" these urinary infections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Confirming generations of popular wisdom, a major study has found that frequent sexual intercourse and spermicides increase the risk of urinary tract infections in women. The research also estimates that such infections occur in sexually active young women about once every two years. The study found that the more frequently young women have intercourse, the more likely they are to get the infections.
HEALTH
April 14, 2003 | Shari Roan
Native Americans used cranberries to treat wounds. Settlers found they helped prevent urinary tract infections. Extract may not be as effective. Uses: To prevent and treat urinary tract infections. Dose: About 10 ounces daily of cranberry juice may help prevent urinary tract infections. People who dislike cranberry juice sometimes use supplements; doses are typically 1,000 milligrams a day.
HEALTH
March 17, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Drinking a glass of fresh berry juice every day may help women avoid urinary tract infections. A study of more than 200 Finnish women, mostly under 30, found that a glass of fresh fruit juice a day reduced the risk of infection by about a third, and that berry juice cut the odds even more. Yogurt or sour milk also helped prevent infection. Most berries contain flavonols called proanthocyanidines, which prevent bacteria found in stool from adhering to human cells.
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