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BUSINESS
July 19, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trimedyne Inc. said Thursday that it has received federal approval to market a laser product for urological surgeries. "We believe this will provide a significant and material effect on the future growth of our company," said Richard A. Dremmer, Trimedyne's corporate secretary. Irvine-based Trimedyne markets lasers and laser catheters for opening clogged blood vessels and for use in surgery. Last year, the firm won Food and Drug Administration approval to use a laser for removing gallbladders.
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NATIONAL
December 18, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
The man who went on a shooting rampage with a 12-gauge shotgun at a Reno medical clinic Tuesday killed one doctor and injured another physician and a patient before killing himself, officials said Wednesday morning. Dr. Charles G. Gholdoian, who worked at the Urology Nevada office on the Renown Regional Medical Center, was killed, authorities said. A female doctor at the clinic, who was not identified, and a patient identified as Shawntae Spears were wounded and remained in critical condition Wednesday morning, officials said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2008 | Associated Press
A researcher at UC San Francisco is under arrest after campus police say he poisoned a female colleague's drink. Postdoctoral fellow Ben Chun Liu, 38, is being held on suspicion of attempted murder and poisoning, police said. Investigators who searched Liu's home and the university urology lab where he worked say they recovered evidence that he poisoned lab co-worker Mei Cao. Cao was examined at UC San Francisco Medical Center and released. Liu, a Chinese citizen, was placed on an immigration hold and remained in custody at San Francisco County Jail.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The more medications men take, the worse their erectile dysfunction may be, a study finds. The British Journal of Urology reports Tuesday that men who take multiple medications may be increasing their risk for erectile dysfunction. Although some of the conditions they're being treated for might carry an ED risk, the medication on its own may also increase the danger of erectile problems. Researchers from Kaiser Permanente surveyed 37,712 men who were part of the California Men's Health Study about their health and current medications.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the patients were desperate. By the time they arrived at the dowdy little hospital in San Bernardino County, they had lived for years with excruciating pelvic and bladder pain. Doctors repeatedly had told them there was no known cause or cure. Most were women, who said their lives were being ruined by two baffling disorders--interstitial cystitis and vulvodynia.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The more medications men take, the worse their erectile dysfunction may be, a study finds. The British Journal of Urology reports Tuesday that men who take multiple medications may be increasing their risk for erectile dysfunction. Although some of the conditions they're being treated for might carry an ED risk, the medication on its own may also increase the danger of erectile problems. Researchers from Kaiser Permanente surveyed 37,712 men who were part of the California Men's Health Study about their health and current medications.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Physicians should not automatically recommend surgery or drug therapy for the treatment of an enlarged prostate gland, especially if the condition is causing only mild or moderate symptoms, federal health officials said Tuesday. A panel of urologists and other experts convened by the government urged physicians to focus on the severity of symptoms before deciding on the course of therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a common condition in older men.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Elderly men who have difficulty urinating because of an enlarged prostate may be able to avoid surgery with two alternative procedures, doctors from the United States and Britain said last week. Up to 60% of men beyond age 60 suffer the discomforting symptoms of a narrowed or blocked urinary tract caused by an inflamed prostate. Surgery to reduce the size of the gland can cause impotence and other problems. The prostate produces a fluid that is a major constituent of semen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
A combination of antibiotics taken after intercourse appears to be highly effective in preventing urinary tract infections among women prone to such disorders, researchers reported last week. The drugs involved are commonly sold under the trade names Bactrim and Septra. Researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle said they tested a group of women who had suffered at least two urinary tract infections in the preceding year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Contrary to widespread belief, incontinence apparently is not caused by simply being old, demented or weak but stems from more complex problems than previously thought, researchers said last week. "It's an enormous problem," said Dr. Neil Resnick , chief of geriatrics at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, who headed a study of 605 institutionalized elderly people, 40% of whom suffered from incontinence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2008 | Associated Press
A researcher at UC San Francisco is under arrest after campus police say he poisoned a female colleague's drink. Postdoctoral fellow Ben Chun Liu, 38, is being held on suspicion of attempted murder and poisoning, police said. Investigators who searched Liu's home and the university urology lab where he worked say they recovered evidence that he poisoned lab co-worker Mei Cao. Cao was examined at UC San Francisco Medical Center and released. Liu, a Chinese citizen, was placed on an immigration hold and remained in custody at San Francisco County Jail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2008 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Dr. John P. Stein, a professor at the USC Keck School of Medicine and an internationally known specialist in urologic cancers and bladder reconstruction, died Friday at a hospital in Naples, Fla. He was 45. A research scientist and unusually skillful surgeon beloved for his compassionate bedside manner, Stein was a star in his field, who was, according to Keck Dean Carmen A. Puliafito, "what every dean of a medical school wants in a faculty member.
SPORTS
January 27, 2004 | From Associated Press
Louisville Coach Rick Pitino is taking an indefinite leave of absence because of an undetermined medical condition that has left him in agony. "I have been in excruciating pain the last three or four games," Pitino said Monday. "It's getting worse day by day." Pitino, 51, said the pain was "urological-related," and that he had been coaching with it for four to five months. He said doctors have ruled out prostate cancer, but they have yet to determine what is causing Pitino pain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2003 | David Pierson and Jose Cardenas, Times Staff Writers
Hundreds of people, including patients on gurneys and in wheelchairs, were evacuated from a hospital in Baldwin Park Friday after a gunman, described as elderly and pushing a walker or wheelchair, wounded a doctor in the third-floor urology department, sheriff's deputies said. Heavily armed sheriff's deputies swarmed Kaiser Foundation Hospital after the 3 p.m. shooting and were still searching the 740,000-square-foot medical complex, room by room, close to midnight.
HEALTH
October 27, 1997 | SALLY SQUIRES, THE WASHINGTON POST
Most small kidney stones can be safely treated by allowing them to pass naturally through the body rather than resorting to surgery, according to new guidelines issued by the American Urological Assn. An expert panel also recommended halting the practice of "blind basket" extraction, a therapy that is still sometimes used to remove small stones and can damage the tubes leading from the kidney to the bladder.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the patients were desperate. By the time they arrived at the dowdy little hospital in San Bernardino County, they had lived for years with excruciating pelvic and bladder pain. Doctors repeatedly had told them there was no known cause or cure. Most were women, who said their lives were being ruined by two baffling disorders--interstitial cystitis and vulvodynia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2008 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Dr. John P. Stein, a professor at the USC Keck School of Medicine and an internationally known specialist in urologic cancers and bladder reconstruction, died Friday at a hospital in Naples, Fla. He was 45. A research scientist and unusually skillful surgeon beloved for his compassionate bedside manner, Stein was a star in his field, who was, according to Keck Dean Carmen A. Puliafito, "what every dean of a medical school wants in a faculty member.
NEWS
August 8, 1986 | United Press International
President Reagan will go to Bethesda Naval Hospital Saturday for a urological examination, White House spokesman Larry Speakes announced today. The examination is not related to Reagan's intestinal cancer surgery a year ago, Speakes said. He said the examination will be similar to one conducted in April, 1982, "at which time all results were normal."
BUSINESS
October 10, 1995 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trimedyne Inc. said Monday that it has sued its distributor, C.R. Bard Inc., for reneging on a contract to sell laser probes used in urological surgery. In the lawsuit filed last week in Orange County Superior Court in Santa Ana, Trimedyne contends that Murray Hills, N.J.-based Bard didn't market the probes as it promised four years ago when it became the products' exclusive distributor.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Physicians should not automatically recommend surgery or drug therapy for the treatment of an enlarged prostate gland, especially if the condition is causing only mild or moderate symptoms, federal health officials said Tuesday. A panel of urologists and other experts convened by the government urged physicians to focus on the severity of symptoms before deciding on the course of therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a common condition in older men.
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