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Urs Fischer

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013
Urs Fischer likes big gestures, and this year (April 21 to Aug. 19) MOCA is giving him the space to make them, devoting part of its Grand Avenue and Geffen buildings to a midcareer survey of the Swiss-born, New York-based artist. The show's curator, Jessica Morgan of the Tate Modern in London, gives us an early sense of what to expect. How did you come to curate this show for MOCA? Through my relationship with Urs. We've been doing projects now for 10 years or so. The first one was a big show in Iceland about [the influence of]
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NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Doug Aitken's roving, cross-country art show “Station to Station,” which is nearing the end of its three week journey, made a stop at Union Station Thursday night - and the event started with a snap. Whip-cracker Chris Camp, who has performed with Aitken three times before in the past, led a procession of about 50 people from Track 13 into the central area of the station, cracking two long bullwhips at each of his sides the entire way. The parade -- musicians banging drums, journalists with video equipment recording the event, other artists and performers as well as curious onlookers filming the scene with their iPhones -- wound its way past the restaurant Traxx and into the courtyard featuring multicolored art yurts with installations by Kenneth Anger, Urs Fischer, Liz Glynn, Carsten Holler and Ernesto.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
As Urs Fischer stood inside the Geffen Contemporary last month preparing for his big MOCA survey, the museum's much-discussed financial troubles did not seem to be weighing on him. "I don't care about any of that; I care about art," said the beefy 39-year-old artist in jeans and a long-sleeve black T-shirt, with assorted tattoos snaking up his arms. And he noted that his show has not been shortchanged because of any budget crunch. "Putting on a sculpture show always takes a lot of effort, but we didn't have to compromise much.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | By Steve Appleford
In a corner office at the Museum of Contemporary Art, a big white board is a tangle of names, dates and ideas scrawled in brightly colored markers. At the center is a chart for the video network MOCAtv, plotting new programs on the artist Urs Fischer and leading architects, on the raw symbolism of punk rock and on something called "CRIME: The Animated Series. " It represents an ambitious range of art-based programming, only some of it directly tied to a MOCA exhibition. "The contemporary art world has so many tangents that we are still reaching out to," says John Toba, MOCAtv's head of production, looking up at the board.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013 | By Jori Finkel
Last year will go down in MOCA history as a tumultuous year of board resignations and criticism of the museum's leadership, but it will not be known as the year in which gifts to the museum dried up. The Museum of Contemporary Art reports that it has acquired a total of 117 pieces, through museum funds and gifts of artworks or money from donors, adding to a collection of more than 6,700 works. MOCA director Jeffrey Deitch singled out several as particularly significant: a 1980 installation donated by Mike Kelley, an original storyboard for Kenneth Anger's 1949 film "Puce Moment," a 1974-75 David Hammons body print, a 2012 gunpowder drawing by Cai Guo-Qiang (above)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
For the last three weeks the Museum of Contemporary Art has been in an uproar over the resignation (some might say "ouster") of chief curator Paul Schimmel. Subsequently, four renowned artists who served on MOCA's board also resigned: Catherine Opie, Ed Ruscha, Barbara Kruger and John Baldessari. On Friday, MOCA Director Jeffrey Deitch, who'd been largely silent publicly until now, posted a "Message From the Director" on the museum's website in which he seeks to offer reassurance about MOCA's financial and artistic stability and its future direction.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Doug Aitken's roving, cross-country art show “Station to Station,” which is nearing the end of its three week journey, made a stop at Union Station Thursday night - and the event started with a snap. Whip-cracker Chris Camp, who has performed with Aitken three times before in the past, led a procession of about 50 people from Track 13 into the central area of the station, cracking two long bullwhips at each of his sides the entire way. The parade -- musicians banging drums, journalists with video equipment recording the event, other artists and performers as well as curious onlookers filming the scene with their iPhones -- wound its way past the restaurant Traxx and into the courtyard featuring multicolored art yurts with installations by Kenneth Anger, Urs Fischer, Liz Glynn, Carsten Holler and Ernesto.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Contemporary art is going on tour, coming to a city near you. Proving that fashion and art remain the coziest of bedfellows, the Levi's  brand is partnering with multimedia artist Doug Aitken on “Station to Station: A Nomadic Happening,” a new public art project kicking off in New York City on Sept. 6 that will raise funds through ticket sales and donations to support museums around the country. Aitken is designing a train (and cool-looking kinetic sculpture, see rendering above)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Jori Finkel
It seemed only fitting that the MOCA gala celebrating the opening of Urs Fischer's new chaos-skirting show, organized under the "creative direction" of the crazy-making artist Rob Pruitt, would have a Dada sort of anti-logic. In other words, it was one weird night, packed with preposterous events and odd gestures that never quite connected, except maybe through a reflexive sort of humor about the excesses of the contemporary art world and MOCA's recent struggles.  The evening began with a cocktail hour or two at MOCA Grand Avenue, where Fischer's exhibition opens with a visual punch: a field of blue raindrops hanging from nylon threads that nearly extends from wall to wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Right now the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the city's Museum of Contemporary Art are holding a pair of highly unusual solo exhibitions. At LACMA, a survey of sculptural environments made since the 1960s by James Turrell to explore human perception has resulted in a show that is on view for more than 10 months - two or three times longer than the typical museum retrospective. Meanwhile, a mid-career survey of sculpture by Urs Fischer occupies about half of MOCA's Grand Avenue exhibition space, plus most of the museum's Geffen warehouse in Little Tokyo - the first time both buildings have been turned over to a living artist since the museum opened a quarter-century ago. Though the duration and size of these two shows might be extremely unusual, another aspect of them is disappointingly routine: Both artists are men. LACMA and MOCA have recently been giving short shrift to solo exhibitions of art made by women.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Right now the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the city's Museum of Contemporary Art are holding a pair of highly unusual solo exhibitions. At LACMA, a survey of sculptural environments made since the 1960s by James Turrell to explore human perception has resulted in a show that is on view for more than 10 months - two or three times longer than the typical museum retrospective. Meanwhile, a mid-career survey of sculpture by Urs Fischer occupies about half of MOCA's Grand Avenue exhibition space, plus most of the museum's Geffen warehouse in Little Tokyo - the first time both buildings have been turned over to a living artist since the museum opened a quarter-century ago. Though the duration and size of these two shows might be extremely unusual, another aspect of them is disappointingly routine: Both artists are men. LACMA and MOCA have recently been giving short shrift to solo exhibitions of art made by women.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Contemporary art is going on tour, coming to a city near you. Proving that fashion and art remain the coziest of bedfellows, the Levi's  brand is partnering with multimedia artist Doug Aitken on “Station to Station: A Nomadic Happening,” a new public art project kicking off in New York City on Sept. 6 that will raise funds through ticket sales and donations to support museums around the country. Aitken is designing a train (and cool-looking kinetic sculpture, see rendering above)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
He is best known as a video artist, but Doug Aitken has a thing for "happenings. " He brought street musicians and famous singers together for a "pop rally" at New York's Museum of Modern Art. He turned a barge in Greece into a floating theater for videos and live performance. He planted undercover percussionists in a Seattle crowd as a way to bring a city block to life. Now Aitken plans to take the idea on the road, sending a group of artists and musicians on an Amtrak train from New York to California, with 10 stops for art and performances - including in L.A. - along the way. He calls the project, planned for September, "Station to Station: A Nomadic Happening.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Urs Fischer is an artist of the big gesture. It's a mixed blessing. Emblematic is a monumental outdoor sculpture in his newly opened, 16-year survey exhibition, which is divided between the Museum of Contemporary Art 's two downtown L.A. buildings. The monolith of cast aluminum, one of a series made over the last seven years, rises 45 feet above a parking lot. Its shape is chunky and abstract, the color a light-absorbent gray against a bright blue sky. TIMELINE: MOCA in flux Move in for a closer look, and soon it's apparent that the form has been blown up from a small lump of casually manipulated clay.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Jori Finkel
It seemed only fitting that the MOCA gala celebrating the opening of Urs Fischer's new chaos-skirting show, organized under the "creative direction" of the crazy-making artist Rob Pruitt, would have a Dada sort of anti-logic. In other words, it was one weird night, packed with preposterous events and odd gestures that never quite connected, except maybe through a reflexive sort of humor about the excesses of the contemporary art world and MOCA's recent struggles.  The evening began with a cocktail hour or two at MOCA Grand Avenue, where Fischer's exhibition opens with a visual punch: a field of blue raindrops hanging from nylon threads that nearly extends from wall to wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
As Urs Fischer stood inside the Geffen Contemporary last month preparing for his big MOCA survey, the museum's much-discussed financial troubles did not seem to be weighing on him. "I don't care about any of that; I care about art," said the beefy 39-year-old artist in jeans and a long-sleeve black T-shirt, with assorted tattoos snaking up his arms. And he noted that his show has not been shortchanged because of any budget crunch. "Putting on a sculpture show always takes a lot of effort, but we didn't have to compromise much.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
He is best known as a video artist, but Doug Aitken has a thing for "happenings. " He brought street musicians and famous singers together for a "pop rally" at New York's Museum of Modern Art. He turned a barge in Greece into a floating theater for videos and live performance. He planted undercover percussionists in a Seattle crowd as a way to bring a city block to life. Now Aitken plans to take the idea on the road, sending a group of artists and musicians on an Amtrak train from New York to California, with 10 stops for art and performances - including in L.A. - along the way. He calls the project, planned for September, "Station to Station: A Nomadic Happening.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | By Steve Appleford
In a corner office at the Museum of Contemporary Art, a big white board is a tangle of names, dates and ideas scrawled in brightly colored markers. At the center is a chart for the video network MOCAtv, plotting new programs on the artist Urs Fischer and leading architects, on the raw symbolism of punk rock and on something called "CRIME: The Animated Series. " It represents an ambitious range of art-based programming, only some of it directly tied to a MOCA exhibition. "The contemporary art world has so many tangents that we are still reaching out to," says John Toba, MOCAtv's head of production, looking up at the board.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013
Urs Fischer likes big gestures, and this year (April 21 to Aug. 19) MOCA is giving him the space to make them, devoting part of its Grand Avenue and Geffen buildings to a midcareer survey of the Swiss-born, New York-based artist. The show's curator, Jessica Morgan of the Tate Modern in London, gives us an early sense of what to expect. How did you come to curate this show for MOCA? Through my relationship with Urs. We've been doing projects now for 10 years or so. The first one was a big show in Iceland about [the influence of]
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2013 | By Jori Finkel
Last year will go down in MOCA history as a tumultuous year of board resignations and criticism of the museum's leadership, but it will not be known as the year in which gifts to the museum dried up. The Museum of Contemporary Art reports that it has acquired a total of 117 pieces, through museum funds and gifts of artworks or money from donors, adding to a collection of more than 6,700 works. MOCA director Jeffrey Deitch singled out several as particularly significant: a 1980 installation donated by Mike Kelley, an original storyboard for Kenneth Anger's 1949 film "Puce Moment," a 1974-75 David Hammons body print, a 2012 gunpowder drawing by Cai Guo-Qiang (above)
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