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Ursula Hegi

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BOOKS
May 6, 1990 | Sabine Reichel
"To read Hegi is a treat, a lesson in linguistic elegance and refinement. Her images are lucid, lyrical and sad. "
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Summer of the Bear A Novel Bella Pollen Atlantic Monthly Press: 441 pp., $24 There's magic at the margins of Bella Pollen's wind-swept novel "The Summer of the Bear"; the kind only a child can see, the kind that turns out to be real. When Nicky Fleming, a British diplomat working in East Germany in 1979 dies, he leaves behind his wife, Letty, and children, Georgie, 17, Alba, 14, and Jamie, 8. Jamie has some kind of learning disability and some kind of gift. On the way to the family's summer house in the Outer Hebrides after his father's death, Jamie leaves hand-drawn maps to the house so that his father can find him. He remembers a grizzly bear he and his father saw at the zoo; he knows that bear has something to do with his father's death and something to do with his young life.
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BOOKS
March 20, 1994 | Michael Dorris, Michael Dorris's first collection of essays, "Paper Trail," will be published by HarperCollins next month
"Stones From the River" reminds you what a novel is supposed to be: epic, daring, magnificent, the product of a defining and mesmerizing vision. It is a long book that you don't want to end because once you begin, every page is a sure step along a path, a milestone that simultaneously evokes where you've been and brings you further toward a conclusion you have to reach. It is a book you yearn to read all night but don't because you choose to save it to savor tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2007 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
In her latest novel, Ursula Hegi doesn't waste time building a complex plot up to a suspenseful climax. Instead, she lays out the turmoil in the very first sentence, with the occurrence of a suicide. Thus the suspense lies in the ambiguity of her title, "The Worst Thing I've Done." It's a phrase that could be uttered by any of her three central characters -- Mason, Annie and Jake -- who are caught in an unhappy and often confusing love triangle.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2007 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
In her latest novel, Ursula Hegi doesn't waste time building a complex plot up to a suspenseful climax. Instead, she lays out the turmoil in the very first sentence, with the occurrence of a suicide. Thus the suspense lies in the ambiguity of her title, "The Worst Thing I've Done." It's a phrase that could be uttered by any of her three central characters -- Mason, Annie and Jake -- who are caught in an unhappy and often confusing love triangle.
BOOKS
August 20, 1995 | Susan Heeger, Heeger is a regular contributor to The Book Review
Good parents--even passable parents--are the early gods of childhood. How tall and strong they are when they waltz you on their feet; how endless their wisdom seems, how all-encompassing their love. It's part of the order of things that as kids grow, Mom and Dad are taken down a few pegs. But for some young ones, a parent's fall from grace is a major dive that takes years--even a lifetime--to get over.
BOOKS
February 13, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
Weedy Louisiana: Bayous, beignets, alligators, saucy humor, spicy food, a no-man's land of race relations; and this is only the fertile background for one of the most compelling voices in fiction of the last decade. Meely is short for Emile, the 15-year-old son of an alligator hunter with a broken heart, Meely's mother having died in childbirth when he was 7. Meely's father disappears in the swamp, from which he emerges every couple of weeks or so with a woman, or better, a bag of groceries.
BOOKS
April 12, 1987
Regarding Ursula Hegi's review of the audiocassette of Edith Wharton's "The House of Mirth" (The Book Review, March 15): The review states, "By then Lily's reputation is ruined and she works in a military factory." For more than 50 years, I have been under the impression that Lily worked in a shop trimming hats ! L. RAGSDALE Los Angeles
BOOKS
September 4, 1994
If you have an unusual and/or humorous blind date anecdote(s) or experiences answering the "personals," please mail them with your name and address to: P.O. Box 644, Livingston, N.J. 07039. Submission of material indicates permission for use in publication; name will be kept confidential. EILEEN A. KOHUTIS, Ph.D. I am working on a biography of Norman Clyde (1885-1972), nature writer and mountaineer who made numerous first ascents in the Sierra Nevada and elsewhere. I am interested in hearing from anyone who has firsthand knowledge of Clyde, and who is willing to share their stories (as well as photos and letters, if possible)
BOOKS
February 22, 2004 | Carmela Ciuraru, Carmela Ciuraru is a regular contributor to Book Review.
With her latest novel, Ursula Hegi affirms the storytelling gifts so famously on display in her bestselling, Oprah-chosen 1997 novel, "Stones From the River." Although Hegi isn't the kind of writer whose fiction offers one dazzling sentence after another, but in "Sacred Time," she proves that a gripping, well-structured tale can go a long way.
BOOKS
February 22, 2004 | Carmela Ciuraru, Carmela Ciuraru is a regular contributor to Book Review.
With her latest novel, Ursula Hegi affirms the storytelling gifts so famously on display in her bestselling, Oprah-chosen 1997 novel, "Stones From the River." Although Hegi isn't the kind of writer whose fiction offers one dazzling sentence after another, but in "Sacred Time," she proves that a gripping, well-structured tale can go a long way.
BOOKS
August 24, 1997 | SABINE REICHEL, Sabine Reichel is the author of "What Did You Do in the War, Daddy? Growing Up German."
"You don't seem to be German," someone will say occasionally to German-born author Ursula Hegi. I have been told the exact same thing many times. No kidding. What are we supposed to be like? Swastika-swinging blond Ubermenschen with master race smiles and that famous caricature accent? It's probably meant as a backhanded compliment, but it feels as if someone points out a pernicious deformity of the soul.
NEWS
March 20, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interruptions can be a writer's bane, but the one that took Ursula Hegi away from her latest novel, "Salt Dancers," turned out to be a welcome intrusion. A secondary character in her previous novel--German dwarf Trudi Montag--began knocking about in Hegi's thoughts, demanding her own story. So Hegi set "Salt Dancers" aside for more than two years and wrote "Stones From the River," her acclaimed 1994 bestseller that deals with the rise of Hitler and the Holocaust.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interruptions can be a writer's bane, but the one that took Ursula Hegi away from her latest novel, "Salt Dancers," turned out to be a welcome intrusion. A secondary character in her previous novel--German dwarf Trudi Montag--began knocking about in Hegi's thoughts, demanding her own story. So Hegi set "Salt Dancers" aside for more than two years and wrote "Stones From the River," her acclaimed 1994 bestseller that deals with the rise of Hitler and the Holocaust.
BOOKS
August 20, 1995 | Susan Heeger, Heeger is a regular contributor to The Book Review
Good parents--even passable parents--are the early gods of childhood. How tall and strong they are when they waltz you on their feet; how endless their wisdom seems, how all-encompassing their love. It's part of the order of things that as kids grow, Mom and Dad are taken down a few pegs. But for some young ones, a parent's fall from grace is a major dive that takes years--even a lifetime--to get over.
BOOKS
September 4, 1994
If you have an unusual and/or humorous blind date anecdote(s) or experiences answering the "personals," please mail them with your name and address to: P.O. Box 644, Livingston, N.J. 07039. Submission of material indicates permission for use in publication; name will be kept confidential. EILEEN A. KOHUTIS, Ph.D. I am working on a biography of Norman Clyde (1885-1972), nature writer and mountaineer who made numerous first ascents in the Sierra Nevada and elsewhere. I am interested in hearing from anyone who has firsthand knowledge of Clyde, and who is willing to share their stories (as well as photos and letters, if possible)
BOOKS
March 20, 1994 | Michael Dorris, Michael Dorris's first collection of essays, "Paper Trail," will be published by HarperCollins next month
"Stones From the River" reminds you what a novel is supposed to be: epic, daring, magnificent, the product of a defining and mesmerizing vision. It is a long book that you don't want to end because once you begin, every page is a sure step along a path, a milestone that simultaneously evokes where you've been and brings you further toward a conclusion you have to reach. It is a book you yearn to read all night but don't because you choose to save it to savor tomorrow.
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