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December 27, 1988
Uruguay's Electoral Court confirmed that enough voters have signed petitions opposing a December, 1986, military amnesty law to force a referendum that could overturn it. The referendum probably will be held in April, said Juan Furest, one of nine members of the court. The amnesty law bars the prosecution of soldiers and police accused of human rights abuses during the 1973-85 military dictatorship's suppression of urban terrorism.
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NEWS
June 19, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The disappearance of a Chilean scientist has stirred the ashes of repressive military rule in South America, uncovering live coals of hate and fear. Although elected civilians now govern the continent, worried Uruguayans say the mysterious case of Eugenio Berrios could signal a return of Operation Condor, an international network of ruthless intelligence agencies that served bygone dictatorships. Berrios, a biochemical engineer, worked for the notorious secret police of Gen.
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NEWS
June 19, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The disappearance of a Chilean scientist has stirred the ashes of repressive military rule in South America, uncovering live coals of hate and fear. Although elected civilians now govern the continent, worried Uruguayans say the mysterious case of Eugenio Berrios could signal a return of Operation Condor, an international network of ruthless intelligence agencies that served bygone dictatorships. Berrios, a biochemical engineer, worked for the notorious secret police of Gen.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | SHELDON TEITELBAUM, Teitelbaum is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer.
There is a moment of truth in the relationship between a torturer and his victim. It happens when the torturer says, "Go ahead, scream. Scream all you like, scream your lungs out--nobody can hear you, nobody would dare to hear you, nobody cares about you, nobody will ever know."
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | SHELDON TEITELBAUM, Teitelbaum is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer.
There is a moment of truth in the relationship between a torturer and his victim. It happens when the torturer says, "Go ahead, scream. Scream all you like, scream your lungs out--nobody can hear you, nobody would dare to hear you, nobody cares about you, nobody will ever know."
NEWS
March 30, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Placards demanding justice vie with street vendors for attention on the dowdy streets of a divided city. Hand-sewn leather slippers, plump sausages and glittering chunks of amethyst crystal compete with calls for a referendum. "Simply to declare people free of guilt cannot remove guilt," law student Karlina Batthytany said, leaning on a scarred old school desk to sign a petition that would defy Uruguay's government and its elected Congress.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
In the first referendum of its kind in Latin America, Uruguayans choose today between two ballots: green for trials and judgment of their former military rulers, yellow for forgiveness for past human rights abuses. Those who opt for green are voting to repeal a 1986 amnesty law and thus seek justice for those who were killed, tortured or detained during 12 years of military-dominated government that ended in 1985. Revoking the law in a public vote, advocates contend, would make clear to the armed forces that such offenses can never be committed again with impunity.
NEWS
April 29, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Raul Sendic, founder and leader of Uruguay's Tupamaros, once the world's most successful urban guerrilla movements, has died in a Paris hospital, medical sources said Friday. He was 64. Sendic, captured in 1972 and jailed on charges of committing terrorist acts that had convulsed Uruguay for nearly a decade, was among the last group of political prisoners freed under amnesty after Uruguay's return to civilian rule in 1985. He flew to France in February for medical treatment. The hospital declined immediate comment on the cause of his death, but sources close to the former guerrilla leader said that he suffered from a neurological ailment linked to mistreatment at the hands of his jailers during his years in prison.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
In the first referendum of its kind in Latin America, Uruguayans choose today between two ballots: green for trials and judgment of their former military rulers, yellow for forgiveness for past human rights abuses. Those who opt for green are voting to repeal a 1986 amnesty law and thus seek justice for those who were killed, tortured or detained during 12 years of military-dominated government that ended in 1985. Revoking the law in a public vote, advocates contend, would make clear to the armed forces that such offenses can never be committed again with impunity.
NEWS
December 27, 1988
Uruguay's Electoral Court confirmed that enough voters have signed petitions opposing a December, 1986, military amnesty law to force a referendum that could overturn it. The referendum probably will be held in April, said Juan Furest, one of nine members of the court. The amnesty law bars the prosecution of soldiers and police accused of human rights abuses during the 1973-85 military dictatorship's suppression of urban terrorism.
NEWS
March 30, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Placards demanding justice vie with street vendors for attention on the dowdy streets of a divided city. Hand-sewn leather slippers, plump sausages and glittering chunks of amethyst crystal compete with calls for a referendum. "Simply to declare people free of guilt cannot remove guilt," law student Karlina Batthytany said, leaning on a scarred old school desk to sign a petition that would defy Uruguay's government and its elected Congress.
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